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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

How much regulation should homeschooling have?

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Poll

Question: Do you agree that homeschooling should be regulated?

Options:

Yes, there should be checks to make sure kids don't fall through the cracks.

No. I don't agree at all. I don't want the government involved in my child's education.


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 68

View Results

Link to the rest of the article

His father, Clarence Powell, defends the home-school education, that Josh and his 11 siblings received, and that he has a right to educate his children anyway he sees fit without the government interfering. And in that respect, he's correct: According to Virginia state law, parents who have a religious objection, can opt to not only home-school their children but to do so without any government oversight, meaning there is no mandatory curriculum and no checks placed on the family to ensure the children are learning at an appropriate level.

by on Nov. 21, 2013 at 12:55 PM
Replies (51-60):
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 11:52 PM

That's good they gave you the option.

Quoting mem82:

My son doesn't test, eithe , he does the portfolio. My dd likes to test.

Quoting paganbaby:

My only real issue with that is, my son can't take tests. Last time we tried that he stood stock still for 15 minutes until they called my mom to come get him.

Quoting mem82:

I like how Ohio does it. End of year portfolio or testing. You have to prove your child learned 25 percent more than last year. Also, at the beginning of the year you give a curriculum outline and material list that you aren't bound to. Easy peasy plus kids have a right to be educated and I don't believe the government is out of line to do a yearly check to make sure it's happening. I see too many people irl and online that aren't teaching their children while saying they are hsing.



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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 11:53 PM

Same here in Cali :-)

Quoting usmom3:

 I love living in Texas because there is no government involvement in our homeschool!


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twyliatepeka
by Bronze Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 11:59 PM
3 moms liked this

I am not for any regulation of HS. I don't want the government teaching my child so I chose to do it why would I want them to tell me if I am doing it "right" or "wrong" ?

hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:37 AM
1 mom liked this

My state (Indiana) is very unregulated, and I love it.  We don't have to keep attendance for 180 days. I don't even have to register with the state or the school district that we are homeschooling, or ever have my children evaluated or tested, or anything. And in reality, no one ever asks to see the attendance records, but by law the superintendent could ask for them. 

I think there are homeschooling families who do a pretty terrible job but most do at least an okay job, and some do a great job. But the same can be said of public schools. Depending on the type of students, the teachers, the resources, the motivation of the student, the student's home life... people have vastly different public school outcomes, too. 

It is sad for this boy that his parents failed him. People like that really should NOT educate their own children because it sounds as if they aren't even educating them at all. I've known a few homeschoolers like this, who don't do hardly anything with their kids, who classify hours of watching Netflix as "school" for the day (I'm not talking about a sick day, I mean on a regular basis), or who sho shelter their children from the world that they have NO friends outside their parents and sibilings. But is the government the right answer to that problem? I don't think the government is particularly good at anything they do.

lhiannan
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:43 AM

I think it's a hard one.  I still think that the state should make certain subjects mandatory (they do in CT, but there is no mandatory testing).  The testing thing I don't necessarily agree with.  A lot of people homeschool their special needs kids because their needs are better met at home (I may be headed there myself if things don't improve at school for my asd son).  How would a standardized test help in that kind of situation?  They would still probably fail because of the fact that they are special needs already.

debramommyof4
by Silver Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:48 AM
Hey! I use Netflix and you tube daily! But there are other things added. I know what you mean, just giving you a hard time.

Parents who do not teach their children but say they homeschool are not helping anyone and I wish there was a way to catch them and help their kids without punishing the rest of us. ( And especially not unschoolers who I am sure half the time look like they are doing nothing even when they truly are.)


Quoting hipmomto3:

My state (Indiana) is very unregulated, and I love it.  We don't have to keep attendance for 180 days. I don't even have to register with the state or the school district that we are homeschooling, or ever have my children evaluated or tested, or anything. And in reality, no one ever asks to see the attendance records, but by law the superintendent could ask for them. 

I think there are homeschooling families who do a pretty terrible job but most do at least an okay job, and some do a great job. But the same can be said of public schools. Depending on the type of students, the teachers, the resources, the motivation of the student, the student's home life... people have vastly different public school outcomes, too. 

It is sad for this boy that his parents failed him. People like that really should NOT educate their own children because it sounds as if they aren't even educating them at all. I've known a few homeschoolers like this, who don't do hardly anything with their kids, who classify hours of watching Netflix as "school" for the day (I'm not talking about a sick day, I mean on a regular basis), or who sho shelter their children from the world that they have NO friends outside their parents and sibilings. But is the government the right answer to that problem? I don't think the government is particularly good at anything they do.

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:54 AM

i can't decide how to vote.

Personally, I don't want any oversight!

But on the other hand, I'm confident I can rise to meet any standards they'd throw at me.

I also feel like it's not my place to have an opinion on what other people are doing and decide is best for them.

But, sure, there is a sad feeling that some kids out there might be in a bad spot and some oversight could help them... ALTHOUGH, I also suspect if a kid is in a dismal and dysfunctional home situation, that public schooling alone won't solve it. Seems to me just as many kids fall through the cracks or the system fails them in a school setting as there are horror stories of homeschoolers gone bad, ya know?

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:58 AM

But how would they reinforce the mandatory subjects?

Quoting lhiannan:

I think it's a hard one.  I still think that the state should make certain subjects mandatory (they do in CT, but there is no mandatory testing).  The testing thing I don't necessarily agree with.  A lot of people homeschool their special needs kids because their needs are better met at home (I may be headed there myself if things don't improve at school for my asd son).  How would a standardized test help in that kind of situation?  They would still probably fail because of the fact that they are special needs already.


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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 11:02 AM

I use it too,lol. Science every morning is the Jeff Corwin experience. Then if an animal catches ds's interest, we'll use it as a jumping off point for the next week or so. Oh! And Hercules with Kevin Sorbo. We watch that after our history lessons. It's nice for him to see some of the stories in action

Quoting debramommyof4:

Hey! I use Netflix and you tube daily! But there are other things added. I know what you mean, just giving you a hard time.

Parents who do not teach their children but say they homeschool are not helping anyone and I wish there was a way to catch them and help their kids without punishing the rest of us. ( And especially not unschoolers who I am sure half the time look like they are doing nothing even when they truly are.)


Quoting hipmomto3:

My state (Indiana) is very unregulated, and I love it.  We don't have to keep attendance for 180 days. I don't even have to register with the state or the school district that we are homeschooling, or ever have my children evaluated or tested, or anything. And in reality, no one ever asks to see the attendance records, but by law the superintendent could ask for them. 

I think there are homeschooling families who do a pretty terrible job but most do at least an okay job, and some do a great job. But the same can be said of public schools. Depending on the type of students, the teachers, the resources, the motivation of the student, the student's home life... people have vastly different public school outcomes, too. 

It is sad for this boy that his parents failed him. People like that really should NOT educate their own children because it sounds as if they aren't even educating them at all. I've known a few homeschoolers like this, who don't do hardly anything with their kids, who classify hours of watching Netflix as "school" for the day (I'm not talking about a sick day, I mean on a regular basis), or who sho shelter their children from the world that they have NO friends outside their parents and sibilings. But is the government the right answer to that problem? I don't think the government is particularly good at anything they do.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 11:03 AM

Even if they make the subjects mandatory how do they know what science we are teaching?  Or is it okay to teach music but never teach the kids to sing?  My father assumed I was teaching singing, but my kids are learning guitar and lapharp.  We sang with them as babies and I still sing around them, but they despise singing.  I don't make them.

What about history?  I teach history as many discussion questions to get them thinking about why things are done the way they are.  Others teach history as a bunch of dates to memorize.  Which method is the one the deciders had in mind when they made history mandatory?

Quoting lhiannan:

I think it's a hard one.  I still think that the state should make certain subjects mandatory (they do in CT, but there is no mandatory testing).  The testing thing I don't necessarily agree with.  A lot of people homeschool their special needs kids because their needs are better met at home (I may be headed there myself if things don't improve at school for my asd son).  How would a standardized test help in that kind of situation?  They would still probably fail because of the fact that they are special needs already.


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