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The Truth About Homeschooling - What Do You Think?

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Just put this article together and I would really love to get some input in the comments.  It's titled the truth about home schooling and gives facts to combat some of those mis-conceptions I seem to hear so often...

http://lioncubschool.blogspot.com/p/about-home-schooling.html

by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 3:54 AM
Replies (11-20):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 8:51 PM

I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.

Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.

Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.


Quoting bluerooffarm:

We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.

Quoting JATomlinson:

Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)



Quoting bluerooffarm:

Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.






TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:08 PM
I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?

At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!


Quoting bluerooffarm:

I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.

Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.



Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.




Quoting bluerooffarm:

We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.

Quoting JATomlinson:

Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)




Quoting bluerooffarm:

Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.







bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 10:27 AM

A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.

I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  

I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?

At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!


Quoting bluerooffarm:

I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.

Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.



Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.




Quoting bluerooffarm:

We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.

Quoting JATomlinson:

Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)




Quoting bluerooffarm:

Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.








TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 11:47 AM
There was a child who always had one of those mini soda cans and that chocolate hazelnut spread. She was the palest little thing too! I would have understood if the school made a blanket statement asking parents not to send sodas. The lunches you're describing should have been a no brainer for nutrition, especially since you explained that to them.

What a wonderful idea on the snack! I was amazed at how many children JUST ate ice cream at the 2-5 elementary. The fresh fruit that replaced canned just stayed on their trays then got tossed in the trash. :(. Children need that nutrition during the day to pay attention.

Quoting bluerooffarm:A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.Quoting TidewaterClan:I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?

At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!

Quoting bluerooffarm:I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.Quoting TidewaterClan:That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.

Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.

Quoting bluerooffarm:We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.Quoting JATomlinson:Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)
Quoting bluerooffarm:Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 11:55 AM
1 mom liked this

No doubt there are kids who do not get enough food or foods that will stick with them!  A soda ban around here would go over like a lead balloon!  LOL.  Some of these kids live on powdered donuts and mountain dew, I swear!

I wanted our elementary to stop selling the ice cream sandwiches, or at least raise the price.  If a kid would use their lunch money to buy ice cream sandwiches, they could buy 2 sandwiches and a chocolate milk.  What a lunch!  Blah!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

There was a child who always had one of those mini soda cans and that chocolate hazelnut spread. She was the palest little thing too! I would have understood if the school made a blanket statement asking parents not to send sodas. The lunches you're describing should have been a no brainer for nutrition, especially since you explained that to them.

What a wonderful idea on the snack! I was amazed at how many children JUST ate ice cream at the 2-5 elementary. The fresh fruit that replaced canned just stayed on their trays then got tossed in the trash. :(. Children need that nutrition during the day to pay attention.

Quoting bluerooffarm:A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.Quoting TidewaterClan:I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?

At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!

Quoting bluerooffarm:I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.Quoting TidewaterClan:That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.

Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.

Quoting bluerooffarm:We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.Quoting JATomlinson:Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)
Quoting bluerooffarm:Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.


TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 12:01 PM
1 mom liked this
Lol, then folks wonder why children are wired for awhile then crash!

The 2-5 started by just selling ice cream on Fridays, but added every day after a levy failed & they wanted more $. Hmm - wonder if they honestly had the children's best interests at heart?


Quoting bluerooffarm:

No doubt there are kids who do not get enough food or foods that will stick with them!  A soda ban around here would go over like a lead balloon!  LOL.  Some of these kids live on powdered donuts and mountain dew, I swear!

I wanted our elementary to stop selling the ice cream sandwiches, or at least raise the price.  If a kid would use their lunch money to buy ice cream sandwiches, they could buy 2 sandwiches and a chocolate milk.  What a lunch!  Blah!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

There was a child who always had one of those mini soda cans and that chocolate hazelnut spread. She was the palest little thing too! I would have understood if the school made a blanket statement asking parents not to send sodas. The lunches you're describing should have been a no brainer for nutrition, especially since you explained that to them.



What a wonderful idea on the snack! I was amazed at how many children JUST ate ice cream at the 2-5 elementary. The fresh fruit that replaced canned just stayed on their trays then got tossed in the trash. :(. Children need that nutrition during the day to pay attention.



Quoting bluerooffarm:A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.Quoting TidewaterClan:I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?



At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!



Quoting bluerooffarm:I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.Quoting TidewaterClan:That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.



Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.



Quoting bluerooffarm:We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.Quoting JATomlinson:Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)

Quoting bluerooffarm:Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 12:33 PM
1 mom liked this

They were already up to selling it every day when we moved here.  I got the PTA selling popcorn on Fridays, at least it has a bit of fiber in it.  The sales of ice cream dropped, better than nothing.  But what do you do with kids who think fruit isn't sweet enough?  It's all about the money, sadly!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Lol, then folks wonder why children are wired for awhile then crash!

The 2-5 started by just selling ice cream on Fridays, but added every day after a levy failed & they wanted more $. Hmm - wonder if they honestly had the children's best interests at heart?


Quoting bluerooffarm:

No doubt there are kids who do not get enough food or foods that will stick with them!  A soda ban around here would go over like a lead balloon!  LOL.  Some of these kids live on powdered donuts and mountain dew, I swear!

I wanted our elementary to stop selling the ice cream sandwiches, or at least raise the price.  If a kid would use their lunch money to buy ice cream sandwiches, they could buy 2 sandwiches and a chocolate milk.  What a lunch!  Blah!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

There was a child who always had one of those mini soda cans and that chocolate hazelnut spread. She was the palest little thing too! I would have understood if the school made a blanket statement asking parents not to send sodas. The lunches you're describing should have been a no brainer for nutrition, especially since you explained that to them.



What a wonderful idea on the snack! I was amazed at how many children JUST ate ice cream at the 2-5 elementary. The fresh fruit that replaced canned just stayed on their trays then got tossed in the trash. :(. Children need that nutrition during the day to pay attention.



Quoting bluerooffarm:A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.Quoting TidewaterClan:I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?



At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!



Quoting bluerooffarm:I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.Quoting TidewaterClan:That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.



Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.



Quoting bluerooffarm:We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.Quoting JATomlinson:Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)

Quoting bluerooffarm:Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.



TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 3:40 PM
1 mom liked this
Yep. It's also a sad day when a freshly cut apple isn't sweet enough, but I know you're right.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

They were already up to selling it every day when we moved here.  I got the PTA selling popcorn on Fridays, at least it has a bit of fiber in it.  The sales of ice cream dropped, better than nothing.  But what do you do with kids who think fruit isn't sweet enough?  It's all about the money, sadly!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Lol, then folks wonder why children are wired for awhile then crash!



The 2-5 started by just selling ice cream on Fridays, but added every day after a levy failed & they wanted more $. Hmm - wonder if they honestly had the children's best interests at heart?




Quoting bluerooffarm:

No doubt there are kids who do not get enough food or foods that will stick with them!  A soda ban around here would go over like a lead balloon!  LOL.  Some of these kids live on powdered donuts and mountain dew, I swear!

I wanted our elementary to stop selling the ice cream sandwiches, or at least raise the price.  If a kid would use their lunch money to buy ice cream sandwiches, they could buy 2 sandwiches and a chocolate milk.  What a lunch!  Blah!

Quoting TidewaterClan:

There was a child who always had one of those mini soda cans and that chocolate hazelnut spread. She was the palest little thing too! I would have understood if the school made a blanket statement asking parents not to send sodas. The lunches you're describing should have been a no brainer for nutrition, especially since you explained that to them.





What a wonderful idea on the snack! I was amazed at how many children JUST ate ice cream at the 2-5 elementary. The fresh fruit that replaced canned just stayed on their trays then got tossed in the trash. :(. Children need that nutrition during the day to pay attention.





Quoting bluerooffarm:A part of me gets it, they see people send junk for their kids to eat.  The school officials are used to having unilateral control, they see these kids that have junk food in their lunches and they begin to think they know what is best.  But they haven't studied nutrition, they often have the same misconceptions on food content as the others around them.  It makes them decide based on those misconceptions that they are right, the parents "don't know any better," and that the kids will suffer in the afternoon because they don't have food that will hold them through their classes.I do get it.  However, after the first time I explained to them, they should have understood that I am not a junk-food-vegetarian.  That we are truly conscious of what we sent with our kids.  But when they choose to be think headed about it, I felt I had no choice but to find another way of educating my kids.  I was known when I was a teacher to have "food for thought" lessons at around 10:00 and around 2:30 because I knew there were kids who had eaten cereal bars for breakfast and ice cream sandwiches for lunch.  I knew they would be worthless unless they had some kind of snack.  But, I never forced the kids to eat it and I never expected the parents to pay for it. I also knew there were a lot of kids who had eaten really good food and I would have never tampered with their lunches.  It was an over-step.Quoting TidewaterClan:I would have been beyond angry. I'll bet anything the students wouldn't have even thought of it again if she'd talked about what a wonderful lunch it was. What more could they want than hummus anyhow? And why did they think they could overrule you as the parent?





At the cafe there was a girl from India who always had the most beautiful (vegetarian) rice dishes, and a boy who had delicious-looking pasta most days. No one teased them for having a non-standard meal. I did almost ask if they were going to finish those!





Quoting bluerooffarm:I agree!  And I'm so glad you handled the situation so much better!  Her answer was that yogurt and red peppers ARE smelly, so of course the kids are going to say they are smelly.  I was livid.  And the principal told me that "she isn't always on duty." What does that even mean?  Silliness.Also we are near vegetarians and they forced my son to buy a school lunch (twice) because there was "no protein" in the meals I sent.  Then they wanted me to pay for the purchased meal.  There was protein, just no meat.  There was hummus in the veggie wrap and a cheese stick.  It just wasn't a good fit for us.Quoting TidewaterClan:That's awful that teachers wouldn't set those students straight. I volunteered in the cafeteria during little dd's 1st grade. One boy had Dora fruit snacks and some other boys started to pick on him. I squashed that fast! Not in a mean way of course. Same thing for a little girl who had 'ants on a log.' The other children didn't linger on it & just moved along to a nicer conversation.





Adults just don't realize what an impact, positive or negative, they can have on children. Teachers should use their power for good, not just shirk it off.





Quoting bluerooffarm:We decided to homeschool when our oldest was bullied about his lunches.  Even the bullying wasn't so bad, it was more like uninformed teasing by the other kids.  It was the teacher's reaction to it.  She told us to send "normal food" and he wouldn't be picked on about it.  For health reasons, my son is unable to eat much processed foods, so "normal" lunchables just didn't work for us.Quoting JATomlinson:Us too, but it didn't really play a part in our decision to home school.  Our daughter didn't make the birthday deadline to get into Kindergarten this year, but she's been reading since she was three and is just as mature as the other five year olds.  I wasn't going to hold her back another year just because she missed the deadline.  Her birthday is just a few days after mine and I also missed that same deadline growing up and hated that when I was a jr in high school I was 18 and all my other 18 year old friends were seniors and were graduating.  Irritates the fire out of me that they make no exceptions.  So that's our #1 reason for home schooling.  The fact that we're Christian and get to incorporate biblical lessons into the lessons is just a bonus :)


Quoting bluerooffarm:Very well-stated.  I think a big misconception is that we homeschool for religious reasons.  I am a Christian, but that fact is usually not even on my list for why I homeschool.  They are incidental of one another.




JATomlinson
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 3:46 PM
1 mom liked this

Thanks, I'm trying to grow it and get some comments on the pages there.  Eventually in the future I'd like it to become a comunity.


Quoting TidewaterClan:

That's a nice blog. I like all the references to back up your statements too.



Lion Cub School - Making Smiles, Making Memories

> Check out our home school blog <

TidewaterClan
by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 3:49 PM
It looks like your site would be a great place for that. You have some great information on there.

Quoting JATomlinson:

Thanks, I'm trying to grow it and get some comments on the pages there.  Eventually in the future I'd like it to become a comunity.



Quoting TidewaterClan:

That's a nice blog. I like all the references to back up your statements too.




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