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First Grade reading.

Posted by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 6:38 PM
  • 33 Replies

My DCG is having a hard time with reading. She is in first grade. I'm stuck on what to do to help her. I don't remember learning how to read, and all 3 of my sons learned quickly with little trouble. DS#3 has always been good with reading and spelling, so I've never had to work this hard with any one just to learn how to read basic words.

She is 6, 7 in April. She knows that letters have sounds. She knows what most of them are, but sometimes gets n and h confused. She just can't seem to blend the sounds into words without a lot of work. Even words she just read in the line before has to be sounded out again. She almost sounds surprised when she finally gets a word sounded out.

Anyone have any suggestions on how to help her? She doesn't really see the need to read, her Mom or DS#3 will often read things for her. I've asked them not to, but they get frustrated with her and do it just to get on with things.

She is really good at math though, when she doesn't think too hard about it or when she does it just for fun. Sometimes I think that she thinks she is supposed to be not as smart because she is a girl. I'VE never suggested that, but I think her Mom has without knowing it. Mom acts stupid sometimes around men because HER Mom told her that boy/men prefer to be smarter than the girls/women they are with. It's hard to combat that, because Mom doesn't do it on purpose any more, it just happens. TV doesn't help either.

She's my only girl child, even though she isn't mine really. I love her as my own and want only the best for her.

by on Nov. 22, 2013 at 6:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 6:52 PM

Have you tried some Dolch Sight Word reading?  My son was having a similar problem.  He sounded out every letter in every word on a page.  It was all about chunking for him.  After we had practiced with Sight Words for about a month....making sentences using only the sight words, drawing pictures to go along with those sight words, doing sight word bingo and using a fly swatter to "slap" the sight word cards I'd call out, racing to the sight word I called out and handing it to me, etc....he started realizing that letter groups made words and he got better at blending and chunking.  After the first month, we went back to stories with both sight words and phonetical sounding out style words and he "got it."  He was chunking, remembering from one line to another, picking out letter group families (-at, -un, etc).  He's doing Much better now.  We just stop and have a week or so of really focussing on sight words and then come back to phonics again.

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 7:08 PM

My son didn't start learning how to read until he was 7 1/2. He struggled and struggled. I tried and tried. Finally I just gave up. I figured contrary to popular belief, he wasn't ready and that's okay. We tried again a couple years later when he showed some interest and he caught right on.

MessedUpMama
by Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:07 PM
2 moms liked this

Thank you, both of you and anyone else who might have suggestions. I'm ready to try anything with her. She is so smart! It's frustrating that reading isn't clicking for her.

ablessedlife
by Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:21 PM
My third DS turned 7 last April. Last year at this time he could not read. He was just like your girl. And now he is reading chapter books like there is no tomorrow. So let that be an encouragement to you.
He has two older brothers who are very quick learners and I think he has felt "not as smart as them" sometimes. But this year he is really taking off with his reading. And all along he has had his own strengths. He is good at math and much quicker at learning violin than his older brothers. So everyone has strengths and weaknesses, but they are, of course, all smart.
With my third DS, I really just had to be patient. I had run out of ideas, and pushing them can cause stress. I didn't want him to get the idea that I was worried about it. So I actually laid off for a while and focused on his strengths: violin and math. When I did try again, I used very easy texts, so he could have some success. I also made a huge effort to supply books of his interests. Good luck!
petie1104
by New Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:49 PM
We use phonics pathways. It kind of puts those pieces together. Even my dyslexic child is picking it up and I thought she would never get it.
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 10:28 PM
1 mom liked this

I was in the same boat. My ds didn't learn how to read until 7 either. So we skipped it all together and just focussed on the things he was good at. 7 rolled around and BAM something clicked. I'm really glad I waited.

Quoting ablessedlife:

My third DS turned 7 last April. Last year at this time he could not read. He was just like your girl. And now he is reading chapter books like there is no tomorrow. So let that be an encouragement to you.
He has two older brothers who are very quick learners and I think he has felt "not as smart as them" sometimes. But this year he is really taking off with his reading. And all along he has had his own strengths. He is good at math and much quicker at learning violin than his older brothers. So everyone has strengths and weaknesses, but they are, of course, all smart.
With my third DS, I really just had to be patient. I had run out of ideas, and pushing them can cause stress. I didn't want him to get the idea that I was worried about it. So I actually laid off for a while and focused on his strengths: violin and math. When I did try again, I used very easy texts, so he could have some success. I also made a huge effort to supply books of his interests. Good luck!


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Howardx5
by Member on Nov. 22, 2013 at 11:24 PM

if your child likes playing on the computer i think its starfall.com, someone was telling me about. they said its a good site for encouraging reading and helps them sound out words they dont know. 

twyliatepeka
by Bronze Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 12:11 AM
1 mom liked this

This is going to sound awful but it isn't exactly how it sounds...My dd is 6, 7 in may & was having trouble too so I decided to just stop pushing it. I didn't make a big deal of doing anything that was reading, spelling or even realted to it and just focused on math and other topics and let her play outside more. Now she is bringing me books & wants to fill in her chart with as many stickers (1 per book read) as she can & is determined to earn all the books in the world. She now wants to read where before taking a break from it she HATED to even see me with a book pointed in her direction. She is even on her way to having enough confidence to read chapter books.

twyliatepeka
by Bronze Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 12:12 AM
1 mom liked this

That is how it was for us. I just stopped pushing the subject and now she wants to read.


Quoting paganbaby:

I was in the same boat. My ds didn't learn how to read until 7 either. So we skipped it all together and just focussed on the things he was good at. 7 rolled around and BAM something clicked. I'm really glad I waited.

Quoting ablessedlife:

My third DS turned 7 last April. Last year at this time he could not read. He was just like your girl. And now he is reading chapter books like there is no tomorrow. So let that be an encouragement to you.
He has two older brothers who are very quick learners and I think he has felt "not as smart as them" sometimes. But this year he is really taking off with his reading. And all along he has had his own strengths. He is good at math and much quicker at learning violin than his older brothers. So everyone has strengths and weaknesses, but they are, of course, all smart.
With my third DS, I really just had to be patient. I had run out of ideas, and pushing them can cause stress. I didn't want him to get the idea that I was worried about it. So I actually laid off for a while and focused on his strengths: violin and math. When I did try again, I used very easy texts, so he could have some success. I also made a huge effort to supply books of his interests. Good luck!




MessedUpMama
by Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 12:17 AM

Thank you all. I'm trying not to push it too much, but her Mom and my DH are worried that she will fall behind if she doesn't learn to read when "normal" kids do.

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