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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

homeschool regulations seem to have a bad rap here

There are a lot of comments in that state regulations post. I haven't been able to find time to read through them all yet. However I am really surprised by the views expressed in the post so far.  

I feel like homeschool regulations / state laws are getting a bad rap amongst homeschoolers. 

I live in a highly regulated state. So I know and deal with what that means - and it isn't what many of you seem to fear. 

It gives and protects my rights to educate my children - as much as it gives and protects my childrens right to an education. 

I still have the right to parent my children how I see fit, I still have religious rights regarding their educations, I still have the right to teach with the methods and styles that I prefer. 

The school district is not allowed to bully me because I have well established laws. I personally feel like my state formally took a stand to support homeschooling by creating laws that allow it and regulate it in a reasonable manner. 

Schools in general need a reform. However, I am thankful that I live in a country that offers my family a formal education and the freedom to learn beyond just that. I also am thankful that I have homeschool as another option. Just because the schools themselves need a reform, does NOT excuse resistance to reasonable regulations over homeschoolers.  

Many times in that post, I heard fears that seemed unfounded. I have yet to see any state adopt homeschool laws that banned it or that seemed unreasonable. The states that adopted laws, made a formal stand to support and protect homeschoolers. That is what laws are for! If your state has NO homeschooling laws, it has NOT officially protected your rights. To me, that just seems irresponsible.

by on Nov. 26, 2013 at 11:47 AM
Replies (11-20):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Nov. 26, 2013 at 5:46 PM
7 moms liked this
Theres one statement you made that really stands out yo me as being very worrisome. You state that these regulations "give you the right to homeschooling your children". No, THEY dont give you the right, its already your right! These regulations are in place to control how you do it. The right was in place when you had those children, they are YOUR children, not the state's. That's my issue with regulation. No one is responsible for these kids but me. I do not answer to anyone about how my kids are taught. The state of Texas recognizes that by NOT enforcing the hoop-jumping that some states require.
kirbymom
by Sonja on Nov. 26, 2013 at 6:56 PM
5 moms liked this
For someone to err on the side of the government literally means they have never had the slick, slimy, back stabbing, cheating, attitudal, and unjustifiable hands of today's government interfere in their day to day lives. Any time any government has decided they "know best" for it's citizenry means the decline and eventual fall of their culture and or culture as they know it. If any doubt my words, please, I implore you to do your own indepth research. Just check out any time period like the Greco Roman period or the Medo Persian period. Look at how these governments took complete control of their society and it's citizens. Their reign only lasted about 300-400/50 years before fall. They were either taken over, first, or they taken over AFTER their values, morals and the ever revolving change/shift of faiths and beliefs.
Any time a government regulates anything above and beyond what works or decides to "make better", always means the eventual/total breakdown and decline of "whatever" the government decided to "make better".
As long as we have government that is of itself, by itself and for itself, I will never support that government.
More government = More Failure, Less Success
Less government = Less Failure, More Success.
Period.

Failure to learn from one's mistakes always means Doomed to repeat one's mistakes.
romacox
by Silver Member on Nov. 26, 2013 at 7:06 PM
4 moms liked this

If one lives in a home school friendly State, it is because home educators in your state have been actively involved at the City,  State and Federal Level protecting your children, and their natural given right to be home schooled. It did not just happen by accident.

Leissaintexas, you said it exceptionally well...I could not have said it better. 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:01 PM
BTW....
I had to think about this post and write and re write several times before I made my post.
usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:24 PM
I agree with this!
Quoting JKronrod:

To my mind, the question should be, "Do the government regulations do something that isn't happening on its own and do they accomplish this with the minimal amount of impact on unrelated matters?"  The problem with HS regulations (or government regulations in general) is that they are a cannon.   If  the issue you want to resolve is a fruit fly, a cannon will, indeed work -- but it will have collateral damage that is far worse than what it is intended to prevent (sort of like drug laws -- but I digress).  Every moment I spend trying to comply with government regulations is a moment I can't spend figuring out how to give my children a better education, providing that education or working for income to support that education (or getting sleep).  If there was evidence that a significant number of homeschoolers did NOT give their kids a good education, as opposed to a few who usually are doing something else that's a "problem" or abuse, then regulations might be appropriate.  But I've seen no evidence to support that.  And I would suggest that any argument that lack of education of a few homeschoolers supports significant regulations for all because those regulations will ensure a better education is seriously questionable.  If that were the case, the public school systems would be producing better educated kids consistantly -- and they're not.  That's not a slap at public schools -- I'm merely pointing out that, since we're talking about people not machines, ALL educational choices/options will have some failures and that regulation does not guarantee a good outcome for everyone.  From what I can tell, states with little regulation of home schools (like California) and states with a lot of regulation do not have significantly different outcomes on student education levels (although, admittedly, this is hard to judge precisely -- just as it's hard to do an apples to apples comparison of public versus private school education -- again, we're talking people not machines).  Unless and until there is significant evidence that regulations actually produce a better  result, I have to take the position that regulations, and the time/money/reduction of rights overhead they produce for home schooling, cannot be justified.   

usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:25 PM
I agree with this as well!
Quoting Leissaintexas:

Theres one statement you made that really stands out yo me as being very worrisome. You state that these regulations "give you the right to homeschooling your children". No, THEY dont give you the right, its already your right! These regulations are in place to control how you do it. The right was in place when you had those children, they are YOUR children, not the state's. That's my issue with regulation. No one is responsible for these kids but me. I do not answer to anyone about how my kids are taught. The state of Texas recognizes that by NOT enforcing the hoop-jumping that some states require.

usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:27 PM
1 mom liked this
Very well put!
Quoting kirbymom:

For someone to err on the side of the government literally means they have never had the slick, slimy, back stabbing, cheating, attitudal, and unjustifiable hands of today's government interfere in their day to day lives. Any time any government has decided they "know best" for it's citizenry means the decline and eventual fall of their culture and or culture as they know it. If any doubt my words, please, I implore you to do your own indepth research. Just check out any time period like the Greco Roman period or the Medo Persian period. Look at how these governments took complete control of their society and it's citizens. Their reign only lasted about 300-400/50 years before fall. They were either taken over, first, or they taken over AFTER their values, morals and the ever revolving change/shift of faiths and beliefs.
Any time a government regulates anything above and beyond what works or decides to "make better", always means the eventual/total breakdown and decline of "whatever" the government decided to "make better".
As long as we have government that is of itself, by itself and for itself, I will never support that government.
More government = More Failure, Less Success
Less government = Less Failure, More Success.
Period.

Failure to learn from one's mistakes always means Doomed to repeat one's mistakes.

usmom3
by BJ on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:34 PM
2 moms liked this
Yes Leissaiintexas did say it very well! You are correct about homeschoolers fighting for there rights in the states that have less homeschool laws. Every year there are bills trying to have more regulation on the homeschooler here in Texas & the only thing that stops them is the homeschoolers working diligently to stop them!
Quoting romacox:

If one lives in a home school friendly State, it is because home educators in your state have been actively involved at the City,  State and Federal Level protecting your children, and their natural given right to be home schooled. It did not just happen by accident.

Leissaintexas, you said it exceptionally well...I could not have said it better. 

somuchlove4U
by Bronze Member on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:45 PM
2 moms liked this
I agree with a lot of what has already been said. I see the regulations as the government thinking they have the right to tell me how to raise my child. That's not their right. My children belong to my husband and I not the government.
Mandallyn
by Member on Nov. 26, 2013 at 8:49 PM
2 moms liked this
I can see your point. It's much easier to prove in pa, with our strict laws, that you have been on track with the portfolio whether or not your child does well on the evaluation. In va there's no legislation for a portfolio, and unless you keep one for yourself it would be hard to prove a substantial education beyond what is shown on a standardized test/evaluation.

On the same token, it's a pain to document work that is done without using a book. I feel like if the school district is only doing an activity once every six days (that was our rotation for music, art, pe, computer lab, library, and health) they are holding hs families to a higher standard than their own schools.
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