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MY child was reading Harry Potter at two years old.

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I decided to try out the Magic tree house series for history for my 8yo ds. I showed it to him and he seemed interested so I'm going to run with it,lol. Finding interesting ways to teach him is a challenge to say the least. So I went on a few message boards to see what other homeschooling moms had to say and I was floored!

I don't know if my son is exceptionally dumb or everyone else has geniuses. But so many of these women are saying, "My 5 year old reads a Magic Tree House book a day just for fun." "My 4 year old reads two books a day!" "My daughter has been reading Harry potter since she was 2." And I'm like, my 8 year old is just getting comfortable with Cat in the Hat...


by on Dec. 13, 2013 at 11:38 AM
Replies (61-70):
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 14, 2013 at 1:06 PM

That's awesome! I didn't discover Eragon until I was a teenager then I was pissed there was more than one book and I had to wait until the next,lol. And thanks. It's good to know ds isn't alone.

Quoting mem82: Harry Potter at 2? LOL
Anyway, as far as reading a book a day at 7?Sure. My oldest was doing that.she went on to read Eragon two months after her 8th birthday.by fifth grade she was reading post college according to the testing she did and that includes comprehension.Now,my almost 9 year old son? He would struggle with Magic Tree House.Dont worry.8) e


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kirbymom
by Sonja on Dec. 14, 2013 at 4:05 PM
1 mom liked this
I just have to say this...
Your son is NOT dumb! By any stretch of the imagination!
If, these moms' kiddos were such geniuses at such an early age, they wouldn't be spending their days on here. They would be trying to get them scholarships to colleges or universities. They would have people knocking on their door asking the parents to let their child be tested and so forth. I knowknow this from first hand experience. When I was five, there was a couple of people who came knocking on my mom's door. I was very very very good at gymnastics. So good that the people who came knocking on our door were the very people who were the coaches for the national Olympics gymnastics team. They wanted to take me and train me so that at 10/11 I could be on the gymnastics team competing. Thank goodness my mom turned them down. Or I wouldn't have the beautiful family that I have now.

So, I'm telling you, your son is doing just fine. He will learn when his mind is ready.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Dec. 14, 2013 at 4:48 PM

Oh for the love of pete. Reading Magic Treehouse at age 5 doesn't mean the child is a genius, nor does every parent with a genius child advertise it, and having family members who ARE card carrying Mensa members, I have NEVER heard of anyone coming beating down the door asking for testing for an above average child.

Quoting kirbymom: I just have to say this...
Your son is NOT dumb! By any stretch of the imagination!
If, these moms' kiddos were such geniuses at such an early age, they wouldn't be spending their days on here. They would be trying to get them scholarships to colleges or universities. They would have people knocking on their door asking the parents to let their child be tested and so forth. I knowknow this from first hand experience. When I was five, there was a couple of people who came knocking on my mom's door. I was very very very good at gymnastics. So good that the people who came knocking on our door were the very people who were the coaches for the national Olympics gymnastics team. They wanted to take me and train me so that at 10/11 I could be on the gymnastics team competing. Thank goodness my mom turned them down. Or I wouldn't have the beautiful family that I have now.

So, I'm telling you, your son is doing just fine. He will learn when his mind is ready.


I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















kirbymom
by Sonja on Dec. 14, 2013 at 4:53 PM
I know.


Quoting AutymsMommy:

Oh for the love of pete. Reading Magic Treehouse at age 5 doesn't mean the child is a genius, nor does every parent with a genius child advertise it, and having family members who ARE card carrying Mensa members, I have NEVER heard of anyone coming beating down the door asking for testing for an above average child.

Quoting kirbymom: I just have to say this...
Your son is NOT dumb! By any stretch of the imagination!
If, these moms' kiddos were such geniuses at such an early age, they wouldn't be spending their days on here. They would be trying to get them scholarships to colleges or universities. They would have people knocking on their door asking the parents to let their child be tested and so forth. I knowknow this from first hand experience. When I was five, there was a couple of people who came knocking on my mom's door. I was very very very good at gymnastics. So good that the people who came knocking on our door were the very people who were the coaches for the national Olympics gymnastics team. They wanted to take me and train me so that at 10/11 I could be on the gymnastics team competing. Thank goodness my mom turned them down. Or I wouldn't have the beautiful family that I have now.

So, I'm telling you, your son is doing just fine. He will learn when his mind is ready.

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Dec. 14, 2013 at 5:11 PM
2 moms liked this

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.

While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.


Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.






No_Difference
by Silver Member on Dec. 15, 2013 at 7:55 AM
1 mom liked this

 While my mom was able to get me to read by the time I was 3, I still needed a TON of helping with larger words...she had to break the down into syllables for me. I could read little words on my own, but that was it...I'm going to be skeptical at that 2 yr old reading Harry Potter by herself.... My 9 year old is still more comfortable with Cat in the Hat too... We're finally branching out and she's "reading" chapter books, but the comprehension level isn't entirely there...so I'd totally take that with a grain of salt. I don't know how the reading in Magic Treehouse is, but I think your son is just fine where he's at :)

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Dec. 15, 2013 at 9:22 AM
This is just like DHs grandma always saying he knew ALL of his nursery rhymes, could walk, and was potty trained, at a year old. I don't completely disagree, I just bet he was more like 23 months old, lol...he was still technically 1.

I think people tend to exaggerate the truth. My DS wrote his name for the first time when he was 2...he was much closer to 3 and his name is two letters that look similar (TJ) lol.

I think your DS is right at the right level, MTH is perfect for an 8 yo. My kids read them along with our history, they will read one in a day but they are 10.5 and 11.5. At 8, DD would read a chapter or two a day before bed.
MidwestMama55
by on Dec. 15, 2013 at 9:25 AM

Kids read at different ages. Also depends on whether mom/dad read to the child daily. My kids started reading between 3 and 4, but I taught them. They were not reading Harry Potter at 2, but they were by 2nd grade (age 6 or 7). My kids are above average readers. Most likely has more to do with home practices, but as long as your child reads well enough for grade level and you are encouraging reading at home, things will be fine. There is a large range of normal.

TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Dec. 15, 2013 at 9:33 AM
1 mom liked this
Maybe we should all start writing books, lol. We know what these kids want! We could specialize in less mature 'advanced books' and more mature 'easy readers' (I can't think of a better term).

This topic came up last summer when my MIL bought DD (barely 10 at the time and not a super mature 10) "Are you There God, It's Me, Margaret". MIL thought DD was totally prepared for the topics, I completely disagreed. It caused some drama around here-since we live with her and DH ended up taking the book away. Just because a child CAN read something, doesn't mean they SHOULD...a rule of thumb in our house is "just because you can, doesn't mean you should" and that can cover a lot of things!

Quoting hwblyf:

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.



While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.




Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.






hwblyf
by Silver Member on Dec. 15, 2013 at 9:51 AM

When my nephew was 7, my mom showed him Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.  She was shocked he was scared by it.  Yeah, you know, I read HP with my 1st graders.  But I believe that the things your brain doesn't understand, you have no way of visualizing.  But to have it visually presented to you, can scare the bejeepers out of you.  I also won't let my kids watch any HP until they've read them all (which means 4th-5th grade for my kids, or later....), but my mom will show them to my kids at her house.  :(  I'm hoping that's a changed policy since I told her our plan, but you never know....

Wouldn't I love to write kids' books.  But I think there's this thing called talent that has to play into the equation.  :)

Quoting TJandKarasMom: Maybe we should all start writing books, lol. We know what these kids want! We could specialize in less mature 'advanced books' and more mature 'easy readers' (I can't think of a better term).

This topic came up last summer when my MIL bought DD (barely 10 at the time and not a super mature 10) "Are you There God, It's Me, Margaret". MIL thought DD was totally prepared for the topics, I completely disagreed. It caused some drama around here-since we live with her and DH ended up taking the book away. Just because a child CAN read something, doesn't mean they SHOULD...a rule of thumb in our house is "just because you can, doesn't mean you should" and that can cover a lot of things!
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