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MY child was reading Harry Potter at two years old.

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I decided to try out the Magic tree house series for history for my 8yo ds. I showed it to him and he seemed interested so I'm going to run with it,lol. Finding interesting ways to teach him is a challenge to say the least. So I went on a few message boards to see what other homeschooling moms had to say and I was floored!

I don't know if my son is exceptionally dumb or everyone else has geniuses. But so many of these women are saying, "My 5 year old reads a Magic Tree House book a day just for fun." "My 4 year old reads two books a day!" "My daughter has been reading Harry potter since she was 2." And I'm like, my 8 year old is just getting comfortable with Cat in the Hat...


by on Dec. 13, 2013 at 11:38 AM
Replies (71-80):
TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Dec. 15, 2013 at 11:53 AM
I will admit my kids saw the movies first. They are 10.5 and 11.5 and have seen all of the movies, they pretty much saw them as they came out with me except for the last two. They were able to know the fantasy versus the reality because we had talked about it. They love the movies. DS has read most of the books but DD has only read the first, her reading level just isn't there to read further. I am much more concerned with them watching things about sex, and the ridiculous shows that show a tremendous lack of respect for parents, and on the parents parts for each other...than I am about them seeing fantasy violence.

My parents used to let DS play grand theft auto...he was like 5 or 6. I put a stop to that, if you can't respect my wishes (which are not extreme) then you won't take my children alone. So my parents are more careful now because they want to take DS (DD is not their bio grandchild so they don't seem to care if they see her or not, but my kids are a package deal so it's all or nothing in this house). We have made it clear that visiting grandparents is not a time for tv or video games, and it seems to have worked. Whenever we visit now, my brother digs out a board game to play with the kids and my parents join in.

Quoting hwblyf:

When my nephew was 7, my mom showed him Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.  She was shocked he was scared by it.  Yeah, you know, I read HP with my 1st graders.  But I believe that the things your brain doesn't understand, you have no way of visualizing.  But to have it visually presented to you, can scare the bejeepers out of you.  I also won't let my kids watch any HP until they've read them all (which means 4th-5th grade for my kids, or later....), but my mom will show them to my kids at her house.  :(  I'm hoping that's a changed policy since I told her our plan, but you never know....

Wouldn't I love to write kids' books.  But I think there's this thing called talent that has to play into the equation.  :)

Quoting TJandKarasMom: Maybe we should all start writing books, lol. We know what these kids want! We could specialize in less mature 'advanced books' and more mature 'easy readers' (I can't think of a better term).



This topic came up last summer when my MIL bought DD (barely 10 at the time and not a super mature 10) "Are you There God, It's Me, Margaret". MIL thought DD was totally prepared for the topics, I completely disagreed. It caused some drama around here-since we live with her and DH ended up taking the book away. Just because a child CAN read something, doesn't mean they SHOULD...a rule of thumb in our house is "just because you can, doesn't mean you should" and that can cover a lot of things!
AFMamaButterfly
by New Member on Dec. 15, 2013 at 2:05 PM
1 mom liked this
Magic Tree House books are great. We started them when my son was 8. He went from very little interest in reading to reading everything in sight. They finally ignited the passion in him. I find that not pressuring has worked best. I have a friend whose son is the same age and seemed to be born reading, but that's just his particular personality and interest. My son loved being read to about subjects of interest while he built Legos, drew pictures, etc. Now, though, he will spend hours reading the books himself. I think it happens when they're ready.
hwblyf
by Silver Member on Dec. 15, 2013 at 3:22 PM
1 mom liked this

Ok, I am so seriously blown out of the water that ANYONE would let a 5 or 6 year old play Grand Theft Auto.  That sucker is NEVER coming into my house.  It's so rude and disrespectful.  Can't come up with any reason to let someone play.

The books are far richer than the movies, and I want my kids to get their mental pictures going.  I read it to them, they don't read it on their own.  My 9yo's comprehension is lagging compared to my oldest, so we talk a lot about what's going on, why the characters might feel or behave in certain ways.  A lot more than we would simply talk about a movie.  Plus, so much of the actual story is left out of the movies.  It hurts my soul (not really) that my oldest loves those movies.  I love the books, but the movies fall way short.  And my children latch on to the violence.  They get really worked up and crazy off the walls from that stuff.  The sexualization they don't get exposure to, so I can't speak to that, but so many parents write off violence in cartoons or fantasy, but it does affect their brains and their behaviors.  And it really affects my kiddos' behaviors.

Quoting TJandKarasMom: I will admit my kids saw the movies first. They are 10.5 and 11.5 and have seen all of the movies, they pretty much saw them as they came out with me except for the last two. They were able to know the fantasy versus the reality because we had talked about it. They love the movies. DS has read most of the books but DD has only read the first, her reading level just isn't there to read further. I am much more concerned with them watching things about sex, and the ridiculous shows that show a tremendous lack of respect for parents, and on the parents parts for each other...than I am about them seeing fantasy violence.

My parents used to let DS play grand theft auto...he was like 5 or 6. I put a stop to that, if you can't respect my wishes (which are not extreme) then you won't take my children alone. So my parents are more careful now because they want to take DS (DD is not their bio grandchild so they don't seem to care if they see her or not, but my kids are a package deal so it's all or nothing in this house). We have made it clear that visiting grandparents is not a time for tv or video games, and it seems to have worked. Whenever we visit now, my brother digs out a board game to play with the kids and my parents join in.

Quoting hwblyf:

When my nephew was 7, my mom showed him Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.  She was shocked he was scared by it.  Yeah, you know, I read HP with my 1st graders.  But I believe that the things your brain doesn't understand, you have no way of visualizing.  But to have it visually presented to you, can scare the bejeepers out of you.  I also won't let my kids watch any HP until they've read them all (which means 4th-5th grade for my kids, or later....), but my mom will show them to my kids at her house.  :(  I'm hoping that's a changed policy since I told her our plan, but you never know....

Wouldn't I love to write kids' books.  But I think there's this thing called talent that has to play into the equation.  :)

Quoting TJandKarasMom: Maybe we should all start writing books, lol. We know what these kids want! We could specialize in less mature 'advanced books' and more mature 'easy readers' (I can't think of a better term).



This topic came up last summer when my MIL bought DD (barely 10 at the time and not a super mature 10) "Are you There God, It's Me, Margaret". MIL thought DD was totally prepared for the topics, I completely disagreed. It caused some drama around here-since we live with her and DH ended up taking the book away. Just because a child CAN read something, doesn't mean they SHOULD...a rule of thumb in our house is "just because you can, doesn't mean you should" and that can cover a lot of things!


celticdragon77
by on Dec. 15, 2013 at 4:54 PM
1 mom liked this

There is research that has found that teaching a child sooner than later, does more harm than good. They burn out.

Oklahoma, who tested the headstart program, found that those kids scored higher than kids who had not used the program. However, by 3rd and 4th grade, the scores had leveled out and there was no difference at all. 

Finland, who uses a delayed start to "school", 7-8yrs old, has the highest scores in the world. 

What is more important is how much you talk to your children, that you use a good vocabulary bank of words, and that you read to your kids quite a bit. 

Make sure that you use a good program and that progress is being made. Otherwise you might need to seek out a teacher or specialist to help out. You should be fine though. I believe it is 80% of kids that learn how to read osmosisly with no issues at all. 

Boobah
by Nikki :) on Dec. 15, 2013 at 10:13 PM
Every kid is different. My oldest taught herself to read and could read pretty well before her fourth birthday. I mean, I helped by telling her what the letters are, a says ahhh and all that, but one day she just surprised the hell out of me and read to me. I thought she had memorized it so I gave her a new book. Nope. Lol

Then we have my 4.5 year old who knows how to say her abc's but doesn't know all of them by sight. She is telling me things like mommy starts with m, but she couldn't choose m out of a line up. I am guessing she will be able to read around 6ish or so. She is a real physical kid, so i don't expect her to read as early.

In Waldorf schools, they don't begin teaching the alphabet until the child is 7 years old, so they aren't able to read simple books until the end of that year - 7.5 or 8.

Sounds like your DS is just fine :)
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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:23 AM

Thank you :-)

Quoting kirbymom: I just have to say this...
Your son is NOT dumb! By any stretch of the imagination!
If, these moms' kiddos were such geniuses at such an early age, they wouldn't be spending their days on here. They would be trying to get them scholarships to colleges or universities. They would have people knocking on their door asking the parents to let their child be tested and so forth. I knowknow this from first hand experience. When I was five, there was a couple of people who came knocking on my mom's door. I was very very very good at gymnastics. So good that the people who came knocking on our door were the very people who were the coaches for the national Olympics gymnastics team. They wanted to take me and train me so that at 10/11 I could be on the gymnastics team competing. Thank goodness my mom turned them down. Or I wouldn't have the beautiful family that I have now.

So, I'm telling you, your son is doing just fine. He will learn when his mind is ready.


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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:25 AM

Yes! I was just at Barnes and Noble the other day looking for books for him and all the ones he could read well are sooo babyish :-( Time Warp Trio? I will check that out. Thanks!

Quoting hwblyf:

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.

While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.


Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.







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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:31 AM

Same with me too. I was a good reader but not that good! lol They say the say the age range for the books is 5yrs to 11yrs. That makes me feel better. I'm sure he'll be able to read them in the next year or so. Right now I need to build up his confidence and love for reading in the forst place. Sigh...that's harder than it sounds.

Quoting No_Difference:

 While my mom was able to get me to read by the time I was 3, I still needed a TON of helping with larger words...she had to break the down into syllables for me. I could read little words on my own, but that was it...I'm going to be skeptical at that 2 yr old reading Harry Potter by herself.... My 9 year old is still more comfortable with Cat in the Hat too... We're finally branching out and she's "reading" chapter books, but the comprehension level isn't entirely there...so I'd totally take that with a grain of salt. I don't know how the reading in Magic Treehouse is, but I think your son is just fine where he's at :)


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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:37 AM

Lol! Oh hell, if that's the case I could make the kids look like geniuses too.

I think once we get to a book that he's really interested in, he might perk up and want to read some. He's so so with the dinosaurs but I hear there's a ninja book coming up. To kinda encourage him a bit, I'm thinking of moving his bedtime back a bit and getting him a book light so he can read before bed. But I'll have to wait until we find a book he rreally likes.

Quoting TJandKarasMom: This is just like DHs grandma always saying he knew ALL of his nursery rhymes, could walk, and was potty trained, at a year old. I don't completely disagree, I just bet he was more like 23 months old, lol...he was still technically 1.

I think people tend to exaggerate the truth. My DS wrote his name for the first time when he was 2...he was much closer to 3 and his name is two letters that look similar (TJ) lol.


I think your DS is right at the right level, MTH is perfect for an 8 yo. My kids read them along with our history, they will read one in a day but they are 10.5 and 11.5. At 8, DD would read a chapter or two a day before bed.


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hwblyf
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:42 AM

You could also look at Bailey School Kids and Charlie Small books.

Quoting paganbaby:

Yes! I was just at Barnes and Noble the other day looking for books for him and all the ones he could read well are sooo babyish :-( Time Warp Trio? I will check that out. Thanks!

Quoting hwblyf:

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.

While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.


Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.








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