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MY child was reading Harry Potter at two years old.

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I decided to try out the Magic tree house series for history for my 8yo ds. I showed it to him and he seemed interested so I'm going to run with it,lol. Finding interesting ways to teach him is a challenge to say the least. So I went on a few message boards to see what other homeschooling moms had to say and I was floored!

I don't know if my son is exceptionally dumb or everyone else has geniuses. But so many of these women are saying, "My 5 year old reads a Magic Tree House book a day just for fun." "My 4 year old reads two books a day!" "My daughter has been reading Harry potter since she was 2." And I'm like, my 8 year old is just getting comfortable with Cat in the Hat...


by on Dec. 13, 2013 at 11:38 AM
Replies (81-90):
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 11:45 AM

More the merrier!

Quoting hwblyf:

You could also look at Bailey School Kids and Charlie Small books.

Quoting paganbaby:

Yes! I was just at Barnes and Noble the other day looking for books for him and all the ones he could read well are sooo babyish :-( Time Warp Trio? I will check that out. Thanks!

Quoting hwblyf:

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.

While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.


Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.









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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 12:36 PM

I read to him a lot but public school really did a number on him :-/ I'm still working to repair the damage. He needs to see reading as something enjoyable, not a chore. As of this moment he's not at grade level but he's at his level and improving everyday.

Quoting MidwestMama55:

Kids read at different ages. Also depends on whether mom/dad read to the child daily. My kids started reading between 3 and 4, but I taught them. They were not reading Harry Potter at 2, but they were by 2nd grade (age 6 or 7). My kids are above average readers. Most likely has more to do with home practices, but as long as your child reads well enough for grade level and you are encouraging reading at home, things will be fine. There is a large range of normal.


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paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 12:40 PM

This really gives me hope!

Quoting AFMamaButterfly: Magic Tree House books are great. We started them when my son was 8. He went from very little interest in reading to reading everything in sight. They finally ignited the passion in him. I find that not pressuring has worked best. I have a friend whose son is the same age and seemed to be born reading, but that's just his particular personality and interest. My son loved being read to about subjects of interest while he built Legos, drew pictures, etc. Now, though, he will spend hours reading the books himself. I think it happens when they're ready.


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TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Dec. 16, 2013 at 1:56 PM
1 mom liked this
My kids read for 30 min each night before bed. It's nice because it is a set time to read, and they are in bed when I like them there but they are staying up "late" so they like it. It's a win win around here! We have done it forever though, I read to them before they could, then as soon as they could they brought a book to bed with them. At first it was just a one sitting type of book but now they read real novels. And they enjoy that time. I think it's the best habit I've taught them :)

Quoting paganbaby:

Lol! Oh hell, if that's the case I could make the kids look like geniuses too.

I think once we get to a book that he's really interested in, he might perk up and want to read some. He's so so with the dinosaurs but I hear there's a ninja book coming up. To kinda encourage him a bit, I'm thinking of moving his bedtime back a bit and getting him a book light so he can read before bed. But I'll have to wait until we find a book he rreally likes.

Quoting TJandKarasMom: This is just like DHs grandma always saying he knew ALL of his nursery rhymes, could walk, and was potty trained, at a year old. I don't completely disagree, I just bet he was more like 23 months old, lol...he was still technically 1.



I think people tend to exaggerate the truth. My DS wrote his name for the first time when he was 2...he was much closer to 3 and his name is two letters that look similar (TJ) lol.




I think your DS is right at the right level, MTH is perfect for an 8 yo. My kids read them along with our history, they will read one in a day but they are 10.5 and 11.5. At 8, DD would read a chapter or two a day before bed.


TidewaterClan
by Kate on Dec. 16, 2013 at 2:28 PM

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.


MidwestMama55
by on Dec. 16, 2013 at 3:13 PM

Sounds like you are doing a good job trying to help him. Keep up your efforts! Being a good reader is the key to being a good student. How does he feel about video games? We didn't really do video games much but I understand some kids, especially boys love them. If he does (speculating here), i'd let him earn his video game time by reading. 15 minutes of reading = 15 minutes of video game time. And the reading would need to take place first. It may in the beginning make reading seem more like a chore than it already is, but I suspect once he gets good at it, he will enjoy it. That's what i'd do. Good luck!

Quoting paganbaby:

I read to him a lot but public school really did a number on him :-/ I'm still working to repair the damage. He needs to see reading as something enjoyable, not a chore. As of this moment he's not at grade level but he's at his level and improving everyday.

Quoting MidwestMama55:

Kids read at different ages. Also depends on whether mom/dad read to the child daily. My kids started reading between 3 and 4, but I taught them. They were not reading Harry Potter at 2, but they were by 2nd grade (age 6 or 7). My kids are above average readers. Most likely has more to do with home practices, but as long as your child reads well enough for grade level and you are encouraging reading at home, things will be fine. There is a large range of normal.



Jenn8604
by Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 3:17 PM
Oh yeah my son had the dictionary memorized by 18 mos. (Jk I'm a bragging internet mom who exaggerates just a bit). That's all it is. You're 8 yr old sounds fine. If he reads at grade level he's fine. Reading may not be his thing maybe he's ahead in math, or science, or history. Ignore bragging moms who exaggerate.
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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 4:31 PM
1 mom liked this

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.



chlippr77
by Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 5:24 PM

I have 7 year old twins.  One has picked up reading, pretty much on her own, and is pretty much reading as well if not better than her older brother.  I honestly think her reading comprehension is way beyond her brother, who is struggling with comprehension, but can read fairly well.  My other 7 year old, however, is struggling with reading.  I'm even going to change up the program we're using to learn to read after our Christmas break.  Having twins has really shown me that ALL children are unique, and just because one can do something at a certain time, doesn't me that another one will reach the same milestone at the same age; and it's helped me to realized that it's ok for them to move at their own speed. 

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Dec. 16, 2013 at 5:53 PM
1 mom liked this

When he's a bit older, he may enjoy the Hank Zipzer series. They were written by The Fonz (Happy Days), who is dyslexic; high interest, for older kids, but a low reading level and larger print. It features a mischievous young dyslexic boy who is always getting himself into a pickle :)

Quoting paganbaby:

More the merrier!

Quoting hwblyf:

You could also look at Bailey School Kids and Charlie Small books.

Quoting paganbaby:

Yes! I was just at Barnes and Noble the other day looking for books for him and all the ones he could read well are sooo babyish :-( Time Warp Trio? I will check that out. Thanks!

Quoting hwblyf:

I think, sometimes, that it's harder when you're not a great reader, because the skill might not be there yet, but that doesn't mean that you want to read about Biscuit going to kindergarten.  I think a lot of it is changing, though, as our kids are getting older.  There are recognized needs for literature to be different for different kids.  Check out Time Warp Trio for your guy, too.  My 9 yo likes them, and he's my more struggling reader (I hate that term, he's just not wicked fast, ya know?).

Quoting paganbaby:

It is hard both ways. Quick learners need something advanced enough but not too mature. Slow learners need something easier to read but not too babyish. Aye!

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom didn't get it when I was complaining to her how hard it is to find something for my advanced reader that would be on his level to read, but not on that higher level for maturity and such.  Until I told her that I did NOT want the F bomb coming out of his mouth or him to ask me (at age 7 or whatever it was I explaining this to her) about rape and porn.  Or even just the whole drama of teenage relationships and the whole different level of thinking.  Reading is definitely one of those things with a HUGE developmental span, and it can be hard matching ability and interest, no matter who the reader is.

Quoting paganbaby:

That's true! I was about 11 or 12 whe I read the book, The Burning Bed. It's a very adult book about a abused woman who kills her husband. It had rape and animal torture in it. I don't knwo why my other let me read these books. She figured if I could comprehend them, I could read them. Yeah...

Quoting debramommyof4: It is that way with lots of the newer 4th to 6th grade books and makes it hard if your child is advanced. I think parents who brag constantly do not think about what they are saying.

While I am pretty sure some of them do think about what their kids are reading they assume their child is ready based on ability and not every other factor. My husband does that and it drives me nuts.


Quoting paganbaby:

Oh no. There are quite a few parts that I wouldn not want my 7 year old reading either.

Quoting debramommyof4: Oh and I forgot that even though my 7 year old could comprehend Harry Potter I still do not think she is old enough.










I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















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