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MY child was reading Harry Potter at two years old.

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I decided to try out the Magic tree house series for history for my 8yo ds. I showed it to him and he seemed interested so I'm going to run with it,lol. Finding interesting ways to teach him is a challenge to say the least. So I went on a few message boards to see what other homeschooling moms had to say and I was floored!

I don't know if my son is exceptionally dumb or everyone else has geniuses. But so many of these women are saying, "My 5 year old reads a Magic Tree House book a day just for fun." "My 4 year old reads two books a day!" "My daughter has been reading Harry potter since she was 2." And I'm like, my 8 year old is just getting comfortable with Cat in the Hat...


by on Dec. 13, 2013 at 11:38 AM
Replies (91-100):
TidewaterClan
by on Dec. 16, 2013 at 9:15 PM

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.




bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 10:21 AM
1 mom liked this

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.





TidewaterClan
by on Dec. 17, 2013 at 1:55 PM

February is either snowy or muddy and cold here too, and that will give me time to modify things if needed.  Plus I'll know where to steer them during the summer reading programs.  I have an accredited teacher lined up to review us and write our letter at the end of the year, and this will be something concrete for her to look at.

Being able to take breaks is wonderful and something they'll both appreciate.  I want them both to be comfortable taking tests in case they decide to go back to ps, and also because the ACT/SAT and college will happen eventually anyway.  Ps made such a huge production over tests that it took awhile for me to convince them it's just a way for me to now that I taught (math, social studies, ?) in a way they grasp and remember.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.






bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 2:04 PM
1 mom liked this

It's very important for us that tests are no big deal, so I was very excited that we could stop a lot!  It seems that schools are getting worse about testing.  My oldest was very stressed out about testing and we pulled him in first grade for goodness sakes!  LOL  So we are trying to give a sense that tests are just temperature taking so that he'll be okay when he does come up against tests later.  It really helps that when the scores come back, he can see that he is usually above grade level.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

February is either snowy or muddy and cold here too, and that will give me time to modify things if needed.  Plus I'll know where to steer them during the summer reading programs.  I have an accredited teacher lined up to review us and write our letter at the end of the year, and this will be something concrete for her to look at.

Being able to take breaks is wonderful and something they'll both appreciate.  I want them both to be comfortable taking tests in case they decide to go back to ps, and also because the ACT/SAT and college will happen eventually anyway.  Ps made such a huge production over tests that it took awhile for me to convince them it's just a way for me to now that I taught (math, social studies, ?) in a way they grasp and remember.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.







TidewaterClan
by on Dec. 17, 2013 at 2:29 PM

No kidding.  When they had the standardized testing last year they should have just sent a note home letting everyone know to get a good night's rest, and a healthy breakfast.  Instead they had an assortment of days: hats off to the test, don't sweat the test!, pj day for the tests!  By the weekend the girls were so worried about the darned tests they could hardly sleep.  It took me two months this year just to get them to relax.  

They'll both be excited about seeing their scores.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

It's very important for us that tests are no big deal, so I was very excited that we could stop a lot!  It seems that schools are getting worse about testing.  My oldest was very stressed out about testing and we pulled him in first grade for goodness sakes!  LOL  So we are trying to give a sense that tests are just temperature taking so that he'll be okay when he does come up against tests later.  It really helps that when the scores come back, he can see that he is usually above grade level.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

February is either snowy or muddy and cold here too, and that will give me time to modify things if needed.  Plus I'll know where to steer them during the summer reading programs.  I have an accredited teacher lined up to review us and write our letter at the end of the year, and this will be something concrete for her to look at.

Being able to take breaks is wonderful and something they'll both appreciate.  I want them both to be comfortable taking tests in case they decide to go back to ps, and also because the ACT/SAT and college will happen eventually anyway.  Ps made such a huge production over tests that it took awhile for me to convince them it's just a way for me to now that I taught (math, social studies, ?) in a way they grasp and remember.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.








bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 3:00 PM

What really drives me crazy about these testing hypes is that people outside of the schools think it is all on the kids, that tests are only used to assess the schools so the kids should be fine with it.  They are turning a blind eye to what this hype is doing to our kids.  It's not the test that bothers the kids, it is the deal made about the tests by the teachers and schools.  

Sorry...got off topic there! I have a tiny bit of a vendetta against testing. embarrassed mini

Quoting TidewaterClan:

No kidding.  When they had the standardized testing last year they should have just sent a note home letting everyone know to get a good night's rest, and a healthy breakfast.  Instead they had an assortment of days: hats off to the test, don't sweat the test!, pj day for the tests!  By the weekend the girls were so worried about the darned tests they could hardly sleep.  It took me two months this year just to get them to relax.  

They'll both be excited about seeing their scores.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

It's very important for us that tests are no big deal, so I was very excited that we could stop a lot!  It seems that schools are getting worse about testing.  My oldest was very stressed out about testing and we pulled him in first grade for goodness sakes!  LOL  So we are trying to give a sense that tests are just temperature taking so that he'll be okay when he does come up against tests later.  It really helps that when the scores come back, he can see that he is usually above grade level.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

February is either snowy or muddy and cold here too, and that will give me time to modify things if needed.  Plus I'll know where to steer them during the summer reading programs.  I have an accredited teacher lined up to review us and write our letter at the end of the year, and this will be something concrete for her to look at.

Being able to take breaks is wonderful and something they'll both appreciate.  I want them both to be comfortable taking tests in case they decide to go back to ps, and also because the ACT/SAT and college will happen eventually anyway.  Ps made such a huge production over tests that it took awhile for me to convince them it's just a way for me to now that I taught (math, social studies, ?) in a way they grasp and remember.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.









firefay
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 3:07 PM
1 mom liked this

I have the opposite problem.  My oldest is almost 5 and has been reading since 3 and can read up to 2nd and 3rd grade level books. She's also sat through very advanced material I read to her.  She has been writing her name and letters for over a year now, and she can do some first grade math.  She could spell most of her name at 14/15 months.  Since she is advanced, my DH expects her sisters to be the same way and keeps getting on my case about not doing enough reading and drills with them.  Our other kids are 3 and 17 months.  The 3-year-old knows letter sounds, to spell her name, and can write the letter P for her name.  She knows counting, shapes, colors. However, since she cannot read yet, there is a problem for DH.  He doesn't seem to get that not reading at 3 doesn't mean she is stupid.  It just means she's not ready.  She's been playing a sight words game and I occasionally do flashcards and we read, but that's it.   I didn't do much with my oldest.  We read some but not like 15 books a day and flashcards.  She learned because she was ready then.   My 3-year-old would rather be jumping and climbing on everything than doing extensive reading programs right now.  When she's ready, she brings me books.  She knows to follow a story and pretend reads now.  She is doing very well.

TidewaterClan
by on Dec. 17, 2013 at 4:38 PM

No, I'm with you.  The PTO even had loads of signs and other junk around the school, which I thought was crazy.  It's too much pressure on the kids and too much pressure on the teachers (I'm positive the principal compared classes).  I even talked to the principal about it last year, and he blew me off talking about how stellar the scores were.  This was right before he got promoted at the end of the year.  Coincidence?   

Quoting bluerooffarm:

What really drives me crazy about these testing hypes is that people outside of the schools think it is all on the kids, that tests are only used to assess the schools so the kids should be fine with it.  They are turning a blind eye to what this hype is doing to our kids.  It's not the test that bothers the kids, it is the deal made about the tests by the teachers and schools.  

Sorry...got off topic there! I have a tiny bit of a vendetta against testing. embarrassed mini

Quoting TidewaterClan:

No kidding.  When they had the standardized testing last year they should have just sent a note home letting everyone know to get a good night's rest, and a healthy breakfast.  Instead they had an assortment of days: hats off to the test, don't sweat the test!, pj day for the tests!  By the weekend the girls were so worried about the darned tests they could hardly sleep.  It took me two months this year just to get them to relax.  

They'll both be excited about seeing their scores.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

It's very important for us that tests are no big deal, so I was very excited that we could stop a lot!  It seems that schools are getting worse about testing.  My oldest was very stressed out about testing and we pulled him in first grade for goodness sakes!  LOL  So we are trying to give a sense that tests are just temperature taking so that he'll be okay when he does come up against tests later.  It really helps that when the scores come back, he can see that he is usually above grade level.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

February is either snowy or muddy and cold here too, and that will give me time to modify things if needed.  Plus I'll know where to steer them during the summer reading programs.  I have an accredited teacher lined up to review us and write our letter at the end of the year, and this will be something concrete for her to look at.

Being able to take breaks is wonderful and something they'll both appreciate.  I want them both to be comfortable taking tests in case they decide to go back to ps, and also because the ACT/SAT and college will happen eventually anyway.  Ps made such a huge production over tests that it took awhile for me to convince them it's just a way for me to now that I taught (math, social studies, ?) in a way they grasp and remember.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I like to take it in February or March.  It can take a long time.  When my oldest took it the first time, it took hours!  You can stop it anywhere and come back later and he had testing issues.  It was really good for him to take breaks every 15 to 20 minutes.  And it's all snowy and miserable here in February so they're not looking out the window wishing they could go play.

It took about 2 weeks to get the results back, so there was still time to rearrange things.  But my neighbor takes the tests the tests in September.  She likes to get them in the groove then test so she can go surfing for deals on anything she needs to change.  Another friend likes to take them at the very end of the year to put in her portfolio as the very last thing they did.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Thank you SO much!  That's exactly what I needed, but didn't know where to look.  Ohio has the new "Third Grade Reading Guarantee" and I want to make sure my youngest would be well above that, even though she doesn't have to take the state's test.


Do you wait until the end of the year to take the DORA or sometime sooner (February?) in case you need to work on anything?

Quoting bluerooffarm:

After the initial reading "bump" when they begin reading more than sight words books and easy readers, I either spring for the DORA (diagnostic online reading assessment) or the Terra Nova tests.  Mine need to take the Terra Novas in third and fifth grade anyway.  The results will give you the reading level.  The DORA can be purchased on the website letsgolearn.com.  

You can do an assessment on your own though using the schonell method for reading age you would have to switch to grade level from there.  Here's the website for that test and the instructions to do it: http://gleigh.tripod.com/readtst.htm

Or you can average the top 3 books that your child likes.  Use the SMOG test for determining their readability and average them to find the child's "true" reading level.  A reading teacher in a public school will often do this one after they've done a standardized test and a Schonell test just to be sure or if something seems "off."  It takes time.  Here's the site that can tell you how: http://www.readabilityformulas.com/smog-readability-formula.php

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Hey Blue!  If you have time, how do you know their reading level?  Last year my now 3rd grader was right on track at the M level.  Yesterday, she and her sister (6th) were taking turns reading The Lord of the Rings - The Fellowship of the Ring and both doing a fine job of it.  According to Scholastic that's an 8.1 reading level.  They also both read the newspaper and other things all the time now.  Do I assume they're at the level of the most advanced material they're comfortable with?


BTW Annie - these are the same two girls who had a (wonderful, best teacher I ever met) reading tutor in the 1st grade (different years obviously, but same lady!).  They just kept reading, and reading, and I also read to them, even now.  That teacher said it's wonderful when the parent reads out loud even to older children because they hear what fluency, tone, emphasis, etc., sounds like.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

My 8yo is reading on an 8th grade level, and my 6yo is just now starting to read the sight-word type books.  Kids progress how they progress.  Some are fast and some are moving slower, but they are all moving!  All that said, even my 8yo was NOT reading Harry Potter at 2 and was NOT reading 2 MTH books a day just for fun.  That's a bit much for belief.










bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 10:56 PM
1 mom liked this

Definately not coincidence, cause and effect!  SMH

Quoting TidewaterClan:

No, I'm with you.  The PTO even had loads of signs and other junk around the school, which I thought was crazy.  It's too much pressure on the kids and too much pressure on the teachers (I'm positive the principal compared classes).  I even talked to the principal about it last year, and he blew me off talking about how stellar the scores were.  This was right before he got promoted at the end of the year.  Coincidence?   

Quoting bluerooffarm:


<Snip>







paganbaby
by Silver Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 11:39 AM

That makes sense and makes me feel a lot better too,lol.

Oh I talk to my kids a lot and use colorful words *No I don't mean swear words LOL* Instead of hearing, "I'm mad!" I'll hear, "I'm so frustrated!" Or, "Audi's being agressive!" "Bubba's having poor behavior!" This coming from a 7 and 8 year old. I grew up with a broad vocabulary thanks to to my mom. She was always explaining what words meant. In turn I passed that down to my kids. That and we read, quite a bit. The magority of ds's school day is me reading to him.

Quoting celticdragon77:

There is research that has found that teaching a child sooner than later, does more harm than good. They burn out.

Oklahoma, who tested the headstart program, found that those kids scored higher than kids who had not used the program. However, by 3rd and 4th grade, the scores had leveled out and there was no difference at all. 

Finland, who uses a delayed start to "school", 7-8yrs old, has the highest scores in the world. 

What is more important is how much you talk to your children, that you use a good vocabulary bank of words, and that you read to your kids quite a bit. 

Make sure that you use a good program and that progress is being made. Otherwise you might need to seek out a teacher or specialist to help out. You should be fine though. I believe it is 80% of kids that learn how to read osmosisly with no issues at all. 


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