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What Do You Do For Your Child's Food Health And Food Safety.

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Poll

Question: How Important Is Organic Food?

Options:

Very Important

Not Important

Some What Important


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 16

View Results

What are you doing to make sure your children are eating healthy food? 

by on Dec. 28, 2013 at 11:31 AM
Replies (11-20):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Dec. 30, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 9:54 AM

Aldi is owned by Trader Joes. That's why over the past few years they have been adding in organic products.

Quoting hipmomto3:

Some items, it's almost unwise to pay extra for organic because they aren't treated that much with pesticides anyway, or you never eat the portion that was exposed to chemicals. Of course if a person is buying organic because of a deep-rooted belief in the sanctity of the earth and avoidance of chemicals on principal, that's a different matter. But from a health standpoint, there are certain fruits and vegetables where organic really  matters because they are heavily treated with chemicals (I believe strawberries tops the list; unfortunately organic strawberries are nearly impossible to find here and on the rare occasion you do see them, they are $6 a pound and moldy). I believe Environmental Watch Group has a list of both the ones most treated and the ones least treated.

Aldi, surprisingly, often has organic produce (apples, lettuce greens, sometimes a few others) at a really good price. If the price difference isn't that much and the quality is the same, I will buy organic when it's available. But I won't drive to various stores or pay twice as much for organic. We eat Nature Path Pumpking Flax cereal, which is organic, and we get it at Aldii for $2.99/box. It's almost the only granola I can eat with my nut allergies anyway, so it's just a bonus that it's organic. :)

I know some families who are all gung ho on organics, yet they buy $5 boxes of Newman's Own organic prepackaged cookies, or organic Froot Loops, that kind of thing. I'd rather feed my children conventionally produced apples and sun butter than organic Froot Loops.



redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 9:56 AM

I don't know if you can count it as a fad since growing crops without chemicals has been done since the dawn of time.

I would say that using chemicals to fight off pests or to make your plants grow larger is a fad.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").



AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:12 AM

I'm sorry. I should have clarified - unless things have changed in the last couple of year, there is no real process these foods go through to verify if they are really organic or not. It is a FAD, imo, that people are buying tons of things organic, that can't really be verified as such, just to have that label; it is a FAD, imo, that people are buying things that may sincerely BE organic, but that do NOT NEED TO BE BOUGHT organic, and paying a ridiculous amount more for those products... corn, onions, avocado, asparagus, etc.

Quoting redhead-bedhead:

I don't know if you can count it as a fad since growing crops without chemicals has been done since the dawn of time.

I would say that using chemicals to fight off pests or to make your plants grow larger is a fad.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:14 AM

Actually they are more like cousins than father/son:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2013/12/02/aldi_grocery_store_best_in_america_related_to_trader_joe_s.html

Quoting redhead-bedhead:

Aldi is owned by Trader Joes. That's why over the past few years they have been adding in organic products.

Quoting hipmomto3:

Some items, it's almost unwise to pay extra for organic because they aren't treated that much with pesticides anyway, or you never eat the portion that was exposed to chemicals. Of course if a person is buying organic because of a deep-rooted belief in the sanctity of the earth and avoidance of chemicals on principal, that's a different matter. But from a health standpoint, there are certain fruits and vegetables where organic really  matters because they are heavily treated with chemicals (I believe strawberries tops the list; unfortunately organic strawberries are nearly impossible to find here and on the rare occasion you do see them, they are $6 a pound and moldy). I believe Environmental Watch Group has a list of both the ones most treated and the ones least treated.

Aldi, surprisingly, often has organic produce (apples, lettuce greens, sometimes a few others) at a really good price. If the price difference isn't that much and the quality is the same, I will buy organic when it's available. But I won't drive to various stores or pay twice as much for organic. We eat Nature Path Pumpking Flax cereal, which is organic, and we get it at Aldii for $2.99/box. It's almost the only granola I can eat with my nut allergies anyway, so it's just a bonus that it's organic. :)

I know some families who are all gung ho on organics, yet they buy $5 boxes of Newman's Own organic prepackaged cookies, or organic Froot Loops, that kind of thing. I'd rather feed my children conventionally produced apples and sun butter than organic Froot Loops.



hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:40 AM

ITA with this. The real way to grow food IS organically. The use of synthetic chemicals is what is a 'fad,' which by definition would be an ill-advised fairly recent way of doing things.

Quoting redhead-bedhead:

I don't know if you can count it as a fad since growing crops without chemicals has been done since the dawn of time.

I would say that using chemicals to fight off pests or to make your plants grow larger is a fad.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").



hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:44 AM
1 mom liked this

This is not right. Farms have to pay very high fees and be evaluated to ensure they are not using harmful chemicals to treat their soil or plants, and that their crops are not exposed to secondhand chemical exposure (such as, a small family farm nestled between megafarms would never qualify as organic because of wind dispersal of pesticides used next door). The criteria are far from perfect, but there most definitely IS a certification they must pass in order to be labeled 'organic.' Other terms like 'natural' can be used more loosely without government oversight.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'm sorry. I should have clarified - unless things have changed in the last couple of year, there is no real process these foods go through to verify if they are really organic or not. It is a FAD, imo, that people are buying tons of things organic, that can't really be verified as such, just to have that label; it is a FAD, imo, that people are buying things that may sincerely BE organic, but that do NOT NEED TO BE BOUGHT organic, and paying a ridiculous amount more for those products... corn, onions, avocado, asparagus, etc.

Quoting redhead-bedhead:

I don't know if you can count it as a fad since growing crops without chemicals has been done since the dawn of time.

I would say that using chemicals to fight off pests or to make your plants grow larger is a fad.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").




redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:46 AM

I understand now and I kinda agree(at least with the part tht there are some things that are bought just because of the label). Corn however, should be bought organically if possible because currently the majority of conventional corn are gmo.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'm sorry. I should have clarified - unless things have changed in the last couple of year, there is no real process these foods go through to verify if they are really organic or not. It is a FAD, imo, that people are buying tons of things organic, that can't really be verified as such, just to have that label; it is a FAD, imo, that people are buying things that may sincerely BE organic, but that do NOT NEED TO BE BOUGHT organic, and paying a ridiculous amount more for those products... corn, onions, avocado, asparagus, etc.

Quoting redhead-bedhead:

I don't know if you can count it as a fad since growing crops without chemicals has been done since the dawn of time.

I would say that using chemicals to fight off pests or to make your plants grow larger is a fad.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Organic is a fad. A fad that we take no part in.

I cook from scratch. I do not go out of my way to "cook healthfully" in the sense that I count the calories, fat intake, etc - it just isn't on my radar. I keep a ready, steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables (fruits on the counter, vegetables in the fridge), all of which the children have access to at all times (they also have access to "junk").





hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 12:01 PM

Most corn grown in the US is not eaten as corn. It is either processed into corn syrup, fuel, or used as animal feed. 

There are plenty of valid reasons to buy organic. We made a commitment a few years ago to not buy any new items that are cotton, unless they are organic cotton. Cotton accounts for something like 25% of the world's pesticide usage, and the effects these chemicals have on the people in developing nations who are forced to work the fields - seriously, if you want to be disturbed, google images of THAT. It's horrendous what we are willing to choose to "just not think about" because it's so convenient to go buy cotton sheets at Target for $15. 

Another good reason is that often, organic farms are small and family-operated (now, small may mean only a few HUNDRED acres, but compared to a typical commercial farm, they are small) whereas farmers who are working for big-ag companies are barely scraping by because the companies only allow the farmers to buy THEIR seed. The monopolize on seeds! When for thousands of years, farmers have been saving their own seeds year to year. But now, the crops are so modified that you can not grow new plants from last year's seeds, and even if you could, the seed company will sue you if you do. 

There are issues of pesticide runoff killing fish and amphibious wildlife. Cattle who are mistreated and never step foot on a blade of grass in their whole miserable lives. 

I'm not saying everyone should eat all organic. It's cost prohibitive for most people. And most Americans eat way too much junk anyway - just eating more healthy food, regardless of how it's produced - would be a huge step in the right direction (and maybe shift our government to stop subsidizing corn and wheat and instead encourage farmers to grow more than corn and soy every year).

(Sorry about my tangent... I'm kind of a food source nerd.)

redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Dec. 31, 2013 at 12:26 PM

We have been buying from local farmers. They grow their crops organically but can't afford the label.

Quoting hipmomto3:

Most corn grown in the US is not eaten as corn. It is either processed into corn syrup, fuel, or used as animal feed. 

There are plenty of valid reasons to buy organic. We made a commitment a few years ago to not buy any new items that are cotton, unless they are organic cotton. Cotton accounts for something like 25% of the world's pesticide usage, and the effects these chemicals have on the people in developing nations who are forced to work the fields - seriously, if you want to be disturbed, google images of THAT. It's horrendous what we are willing to choose to "just not think about" because it's so convenient to go buy cotton sheets at Target for $15. 

Another good reason is that often, organic farms are small and family-operated (now, small may mean only a few HUNDRED acres, but compared to a typical commercial farm, they are small) whereas farmers who are working for big-ag companies are barely scraping by because the companies only allow the farmers to buy THEIR seed. The monopolize on seeds! When for thousands of years, farmers have been saving their own seeds year to year. But now, the crops are so modified that you can not grow new plants from last year's seeds, and even if you could, the seed company will sue you if you do. 

There are issues of pesticide runoff killing fish and amphibious wildlife. Cattle who are mistreated and never step foot on a blade of grass in their whole miserable lives. 

I'm not saying everyone should eat all organic. It's cost prohibitive for most people. And most Americans eat way too much junk anyway - just eating more healthy food, regardless of how it's produced - would be a huge step in the right direction (and maybe shift our government to stop subsidizing corn and wheat and instead encourage farmers to grow more than corn and soy every year).

(Sorry about my tangent... I'm kind of a food source nerd.)



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