Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Homeschoolers + College = Capability ??

Posted by   + Show Post

Can Homeschoolers Do Well in College?

It's a more relevant question today since the number of college students who have been homeschooled has exploded. Back in the 1970s, only 13,000 students were homeschooled while today there are more than 1.5 million.

A new study published in The Journal of College Admission suggests that homeschool students enjoy higher ACT scores, grade point averages and graduation rates compared with other college students. The finding are especially interesting because there has been a paucity of research focused on how homeschooled students fare in college.

The research, which was conducted by Michael Cogan, the director of institutional research and analysis at the University of St. Thomas, focused on the experiences of homeschooled students at an unnamed medium-sized university in the upper Midwest.

Here are some of Cogan's findings:
Homeschool students earned a higher ACT score (26.5) versus 25.0 for other incoming freshmen.
Homeschool students earned more college credits (14.7) prior to their freshmen year than other students (6.0).
Homeschooled freshmen were less likely to live on campus (72.4%) than the rest of the freshmen class (92.7%).
Homeschoolers were more likely to identify themselves as Roman Catholic (68.4%).
Homeschool freshmen earned a higher grade points average (3.37) their first semester in college compared with the other freshmen (3.08).
Homeschool students finished their freshmen year with a better GPA (3.41) than the rest of their class (3.12).
The GPA advantage was still present when homeschoolers were college seniors. Their average GPA was 3.46 versus 3.16 for other seniors.
Homeschool students graduated from college at a higher rate (66.7%) than their peers (57.5%).
Of course, the big knock on homeschool students is that they never develop social skills since their classrooms are often their kitchen tables and their mothers are often their teachers. Cogan, however, noted that another homeschool study that looked at more than 7,300 adults, who had been homeschooled, determined that the homeschool graduates were more likely to have voted and participated in community service than other adults.

  

undefined

by on Dec. 29, 2013 at 3:11 PM
Replies (11-20):
JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Dec. 29, 2013 at 4:08 PM
1 mom liked this

 I suspect that the reason you have a RC slant is because one of the major home schooling "groups" or philosophies is Classical Education (i.e., Latin, Great Books, etc.)  And that favors (or is favored by) Catholics (although I'm Jewish and to the extent that we have a "program" we do Classical) since a lot of the work prior to 1600 is Church (as in Roman Catholic church) based.  Also, Classical home schoolers tend to want or expect their kids to go  to college, perhaps more than most home schoolers -- thus, I suspect that the population quesitioned may have been more heavily "Classical". 

What's really amusing is that one of my son's teachers is a Brit of Pakistani decent. He's Oxbridge trained -- in physics as I recall, but he teaches my son Arabic via Skype.  He's very enthusiastic about home schooling. Although he's only just married his sister's children are being home schooled.  He sent me a link to a Muslim curriculum from a publisher here in Northern California.  I looked at it and started laughing because every book listed was also on the list for the "Classical," obviously Catholic, home school curriculums that I had looked at, although they did include Arabic for obvious reasons.   They even wanted the kids to learn Latin!   

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 

 

PurpleCupcake
by on Dec. 29, 2013 at 4:12 PM

Ot..I want my  kids to learn Arabic..but my dd wants Chinese!

Quoting JKronrod:

 I suspect that the reason you have a RC slant is because one of the major home schooling "groups" or philosophies is Classical Education (i.e., Latin, Great Books, etc.)  And that favors (or is favored by) Catholics (although I'm Jewish and to the extent that we have a "program" we do Classical) since a lot of the work prior to 1600 is Church (as in Roman Catholic church) based.  Also, Classical home schoolers tend to want or expect their kids to go  to college, perhaps more than most home schoolers -- thus, I suspect that the population quesitioned may have been more heavily "Classical". 

What's really amusing is that one of my son's teachers is a Brit of Pakistani decent. He's Oxbridge trained -- in physics as I recall, but he teaches my son Arabic via Skype.  He's very enthusiastic about home schooling. Although he's only just married his sister's children are being home schooled.  He sent me a link to a Muslim curriculum from a publisher here in Northern California.  I looked at it and started laughing because every book listed was also on the list for the "Classical," obviously Catholic, home school curriculums that I had looked at, although they did include Arabic for obvious reasons.   They even wanted the kids to learn Latin!   

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 



JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Dec. 29, 2013 at 4:35 PM

 Well, I've got a great teacher if you are interested!  Message me if you want the contact information.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Ot..I want my  kids to learn Arabic..but my dd wants Chinese!

Quoting JKronrod:

 I suspect that the reason you have a RC slant is because one of the major home schooling "groups" or philosophies is Classical Education (i.e., Latin, Great Books, etc.)  And that favors (or is favored by) Catholics (although I'm Jewish and to the extent that we have a "program" we do Classical) since a lot of the work prior to 1600 is Church (as in Roman Catholic church) based.  Also, Classical home schoolers tend to want or expect their kids to go  to college, perhaps more than most home schoolers -- thus, I suspect that the population quesitioned may have been more heavily "Classical". 

What's really amusing is that one of my son's teachers is a Brit of Pakistani decent. He's Oxbridge trained -- in physics as I recall, but he teaches my son Arabic via Skype.  He's very enthusiastic about home schooling. Although he's only just married his sister's children are being home schooled.  He sent me a link to a Muslim curriculum from a publisher here in Northern California.  I looked at it and started laughing because every book listed was also on the list for the "Classical," obviously Catholic, home school curriculums that I had looked at, although they did include Arabic for obvious reasons.   They even wanted the kids to learn Latin!   

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 

 


 

PurpleCupcake
by on Dec. 29, 2013 at 5:20 PM

Lol...they aren't ready yet. I'll write your name down though if I can convince them. 

I just think Arabic will be much more useful. If you think about it there are probably more people and places to travel to that would either speak Arabic or English when you consider religion in those areas.

Quoting JKronrod:

 Well, I've got a great teacher if you are interested!  Message me if you want the contact information.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Ot..I want my  kids to learn Arabic..but my dd wants Chinese!

Quoting JKronrod:

 I suspect that the reason you have a RC slant is because one of the major home schooling "groups" or philosophies is Classical Education (i.e., Latin, Great Books, etc.)  And that favors (or is favored by) Catholics (although I'm Jewish and to the extent that we have a "program" we do Classical) since a lot of the work prior to 1600 is Church (as in Roman Catholic church) based.  Also, Classical home schoolers tend to want or expect their kids to go  to college, perhaps more than most home schoolers -- thus, I suspect that the population quesitioned may have been more heavily "Classical". 

What's really amusing is that one of my son's teachers is a Brit of Pakistani decent. He's Oxbridge trained -- in physics as I recall, but he teaches my son Arabic via Skype.  He's very enthusiastic about home schooling. Although he's only just married his sister's children are being home schooled.  He sent me a link to a Muslim curriculum from a publisher here in Northern California.  I looked at it and started laughing because every book listed was also on the list for the "Classical," obviously Catholic, home school curriculums that I had looked at, although they did include Arabic for obvious reasons.   They even wanted the kids to learn Latin!   

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 





Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Dec. 29, 2013 at 7:49 PM

I'd let her learn the language she wanted. If she likes learning languages after that she may go for the one you want.

My kids both went to college. Neither had socialization issues of any kind, except maybe being appalled at how rude and disrespectful the kids were in class.

College turned out to not be the right path for one of my kids. Not a big surprise I hated college too and so did my husband.

My other child did well until a brain injury. Now we are having neurological testing.

Quoting JKronrod:

 Well, I've got a great teacher if you are interested!  Message me if you want the contact information.

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

Ot..I want my  kids to learn Arabic..but my dd wants Chinese!

Quoting JKronrod:

 I suspect that the reason you have a RC slant is because one of the major home schooling "groups" or philosophies is Classical Education (i.e., Latin, Great Books, etc.)  And that favors (or is favored by) Catholics (although I'm Jewish and to the extent that we have a "program" we do Classical) since a lot of the work prior to 1600 is Church (as in Roman Catholic church) based.  Also, Classical home schoolers tend to want or expect their kids to go  to college, perhaps more than most home schoolers -- thus, I suspect that the population quesitioned may have been more heavily "Classical". 

What's really amusing is that one of my son's teachers is a Brit of Pakistani decent. He's Oxbridge trained -- in physics as I recall, but he teaches my son Arabic via Skype.  He's very enthusiastic about home schooling. Although he's only just married his sister's children are being home schooled.  He sent me a link to a Muslim curriculum from a publisher here in Northern California.  I looked at it and started laughing because every book listed was also on the list for the "Classical," obviously Catholic, home school curriculums that I had looked at, although they did include Arabic for obvious reasons.   They even wanted the kids to learn Latin!   

Quoting PurpleCupcake:

That's weird about the Roman Catholic stat. 





TidewaterClan
by on Dec. 29, 2013 at 9:42 PM
1 mom liked this
One of my work buddies has a wife who has homeschooled all seven of their children (they're Catholic too btw). The two oldest girls are in college and doing a terrific job of it. The girls said one advantage they have is being able to find their own resources to complete assignments. Some of the other students struggle with that, but their mom taught then how to find things on their own.
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Dec. 29, 2013 at 9:58 PM

Huh, the stats seem to be supporting homeschool, even if the summary does not...though I'm not sure I can trust any study that states homeschoolers both fail to develop social skills And are more likely to be voted for/participate in community events - social activities....how can one fail to develop social skills yet be known for participating in social activities?

JKronrod
by Bronze Member on Dec. 29, 2013 at 10:23 PM

 I think it may depend on what the definition of "social skills" is and the metric they are using. 

Quoting KickButtMama:

Huh, the stats seem to be supporting homeschool, even if the summary does not...though I'm not sure I can trust any study that states homeschoolers both fail to develop social skills And are more likely to be voted for/participate in community events - social activities....how can one fail to develop social skills yet be known for participating in social activities?

 

usmom3
by BJ on Dec. 29, 2013 at 10:44 PM
1 mom liked this

That is great!

sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on Dec. 30, 2013 at 5:48 PM

The summary isn't knocking homeschooling. It is stating what is often give as a reason against homeschooling then refers to a study that contradicts that.

Quoting KickButtMama:

Huh, the stats seem to be supporting homeschool, even if the summary does not...though I'm not sure I can trust any study that states homeschoolers both fail to develop social skills And are more likely to be voted for/participate in community events - social activities....how can one fail to develop social skills yet be known for participating in social activities?


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN