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Math U See

Posted by on Jan. 7, 2014 at 8:13 AM
  • 60 Replies

Lately I've heard people say that Math U See is primarily for kids who are behind in math or not good at math.  Seeing as how I'm using Math U See for all of my kids and 2 have wonderfully mathematical minds and are above grade level, I was wondering why people think MUS cannot be used for these kids?  Anyone care to weigh in?

Those who use it.... How do YOU teach the lessons?

by on Jan. 7, 2014 at 8:13 AM
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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 8:30 AM

Here's how I do it for my very mathematically inclined oldest son...

He reads the chapter in the hard back book.  Together we do the first worksheet.  Day 2 he does the 4th worksheet (the first sheet with review work) I check it and we discuss anything he is doing wrong.  Day 3 He does all of the word problems and he teaches me the lesson using worksheet 5 or 6.  Day 4 he does the test.  Day 5 he does the enrichment OR we do a chapter of Life of Fred for fun (or both LOL).  So basically we do a lesson each week.  That said when we do easy multiplication tables (like multiplying and counting by 5s) we do both lessons at once because each worksheet take about 15-20 minutes.  

No_Difference
by Silver Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 8:42 AM

 Both my neighbor and I use it with our kids, and I don't see them being behind in math, so I find that interesting (and I feel like I've missed something...)

Anyway, For my daughter, who was actually struggling in math, but seems to have overcome all the struggles created by the PS:
She hates the videos. She refuses to watch them. So I read the teachers manual to myself the night before we start a new chapter to get an idea of what she's supposed to be doing, take in any tips there might be there, and then I teach it to her the next day, and usually in a way that is more similar to how I learned it. With multiplication for instance, she wasn't a fan of doing all the adding below the problem, so I ended up teaching her the "traditional" way, and she did great with it. Then for some reason, she was determined to learn it the "MUS" way, so we went back and worked on it that way until she got the hang of it. Then for the heck of it, she wanted to learn the lattice method, so I figured that way out, and taught her that way too....and I want to say there was one more way that dealt with shapes, but I can't remember it...
This year we're doing the Delta book, and lately it has been, Lesson whatever A on Monday, C on Tuesday E on Wednesday G on Thursday, and Test on Friday. Thats on weeks where she needs the whole week. Otherwise we do A on Monday, one of the review pages on Tuesday if it is really needed (and then its usually only the review parts) and the Test Wed. On very rare occasions, we've done a review page Monday, and Test Tuesday, and continued on. We're not dwelling on anything we don't have to.

With my little guy, before our Christmas break, he had just finised the Primer, and we're onto Alpha now. I think he flew through the Primer really quickly, but he is blasting through Alpha already. This is our second week back, and he's onto Chapter 5. I'm basically doing with him what I do with Jamie, but he is just Monday A, Tuesday Test right now. I'm sure once we get into more of just the adding we'll slow down...maybe...he did zip through that in the Primer too.

With the Test booklets, we don't treat them as tests, just as reviews of the lesson, where the review pages in the workbook is a review of everything they should know. That way there is no stressing out for my very test anxious daughter.

celtic77dragon
by Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 9:21 AM

I mentioned something like that. I just know that that Teaching Textbooks and Math U See are commonly recommended to those that have kids who struggle with math. I did not mean to imply that it is lacking in some way.

My kids did not like that it stayed on one subject for so long and did not like the blocks. They are able to grasp the concepts and move on quickly.

To each their own

"Education is not filling a pail but the lighting of a fire." Education is BOTH the filling of a pail and the lighting of a fire. 

jen2150
by Silver Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 10:39 AM
I hear the same thing about TT but both of my sons are very mathematical. I personally don't see it either. I think most programs rush through most math concepts too quickly. I don't think any math curriculum should be done on their own. We do TT 3 times per week, life of fred and math journals twice per week, and we read books on mathematicians and the history of math.
Jinx-Troublex3
by Jinx on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:06 AM
We use both MUS and TT.

MUS is great for getting kids caught up, but hecause you can do it any.way ypu want, it works for most learners. Those more advanced just move at a faster pace.

We use a charter school. I know it LOOKS like DD is below grade level when she takes the state math test. That should change this year. Because of the mastery approach, DD was just learning division in 4th grade. In PS, they would have started it in 3rd so she didnt even have a clue on a big portion of the division, yet she was doing multiplication at a much higher level than most 3rd graders which it did not test for. Same with fractions. This year 5th is all fractions. In PS it would have been introduced way earlier but by end of the year, she will be at a much higher level (like 7th ps equivalent) at the end of the year. I don't care about the testing and love MUS.

TT is a bit behind grade level, but again, take the test and move to the higher level if it is a better fit.

Teaching MUS...my oldest watches the videos and does A. If ue aces it, he goes on and does a page a day and the test on Friday. If he needs help, I reteach it from the textbook and then he goes on.

DS2 and DD do best if I teach from the book and oversee them doing A to make sure they have it down.

DS2, however, switched to TT several years ago. He reviews the instruction in the book and does the lesson and then enters his finished work in the computer. He rarely watches the computer lesson.
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:09 AM
1 mom liked this
My elder two are mathmatically smart. We landed on MUS this year and looooove it.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:14 AM

LOL!  I love how she wanted to learn the other ways too!  That is great!

I have heard it from a couple people here on CM but it really hit me when I was reading The Well-Trained Mind and it suggested MUS ONLY for kids strugling with math.  I thought that seemed strange since my own kids are so good at math (other than my middle, he struggles).

My son is fairly test anxious as well, but the MUS tests actually started to calm him down.  He has never gotten below 95% on any of it, there is just so much practice if they need it that he got more comfortable because he KNEW the stuff before we tested it.

My middle loved the videos for a while, then he decided he hated them.  We keep going back and forth. Heehee.

Quoting No_Difference:

 Both my neighbor and I use it with our kids, and I don't see them being behind in math, so I find that interesting (and I feel like I've missed something...)

Anyway, For my daughter, who was actually struggling in math, but seems to have overcome all the struggles created by the PS:
She hates the videos. She refuses to watch them. So I read the teachers manual to myself the night before we start a new chapter to get an idea of what she's supposed to be doing, take in any tips there might be there, and then I teach it to her the next day, and usually in a way that is more similar to how I learned it. With multiplication for instance, she wasn't a fan of doing all the adding below the problem, so I ended up teaching her the "traditional" way, and she did great with it. Then for some reason, she was determined to learn it the "MUS" way, so we went back and worked on it that way until she got the hang of it. Then for the heck of it, she wanted to learn the lattice method, so I figured that way out, and taught her that way too....and I want to say there was one more way that dealt with shapes, but I can't remember it...
This year we're doing the Delta book, and lately it has been, Lesson whatever A on Monday, C on Tuesday E on Wednesday G on Thursday, and Test on Friday. Thats on weeks where she needs the whole week. Otherwise we do A on Monday, one of the review pages on Tuesday if it is really needed (and then its usually only the review parts) and the Test Wed. On very rare occasions, we've done a review page Monday, and Test Tuesday, and continued on. We're not dwelling on anything we don't have to.

With my little guy, before our Christmas break, he had just finised the Primer, and we're onto Alpha now. I think he flew through the Primer really quickly, but he is blasting through Alpha already. This is our second week back, and he's onto Chapter 5. I'm basically doing with him what I do with Jamie, but he is just Monday A, Tuesday Test right now. I'm sure once we get into more of just the adding we'll slow down...maybe...he did zip through that in the Primer too.

With the Test booklets, we don't treat them as tests, just as reviews of the lesson, where the review pages in the workbook is a review of everything they should know. That way there is no stressing out for my very test anxious daughter.


SarahNElijah
by Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:15 AM
I have only ever heard people say it is for hands-on learners, not slow learners, and there is a huge difference between the two.. I don't think just because it doesn't work for your kids, doesn't mean they are 'ahead' or 'quicker' either, they just have a different learning style in my opinion.

That being said, I just bought Math U See and am waiting on it in the mail. :-) My son is very mathematical but also very hands on, so hopefully it will be a good fit!
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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:16 AM


Quoting celtic77dragon:

I mentioned something like that. I just know that that Teaching Textbooks and Math U See are commonly recommended to those that have kids who struggle with math. I did not mean to imply that it is lacking in some way.

My kids did not like that it stayed on one subject for so long and did not like the blocks. They are able to grasp the concepts and move on quickly.

To each their own

The Well Trained Mind suggested that it was only good for children who struggle with their math.  I wondered what others thought about it.  I thought maybe it had to do with how many worksheets are avalaible, but I don't know anyone who uses all of them.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2014 at 11:18 AM


Quoting jen2150: I hear the same thing about TT but both of my sons are very mathematical. I personally don't see it either. I think most programs rush through most math concepts too quickly. I don't think any math curriculum should be done on their own. We do TT 3 times per week, life of fred and math journals twice per week, and we read books on mathematicians and the history of math.

We add Life of Fred for fun too!  It introduces words and concepts so early that i just love it!  And the boys love how Fred teaches Kingie!!  :-)

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