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Courts Criticize Home School Family For Not Using State Certified Home School Curriculum

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Even though Texas does not require the use of State Certified Home School Curriculum, the courts are siting the parents:  

Texas Home School Family Battles Judge Over Homeschooling. 

by on Jan. 12, 2014 at 1:55 PM
Replies (21-26):
hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on Jan. 14, 2014 at 9:42 AM
2 moms liked this

I agree, foster children should stay in their schools. I know a couple of families who foster, and they keep the children enrolled in the same public school they were in before they were removed from their homes. I don't know for sure if the law is they have to stay at the same school, or they just have to be in school, but these foster parents keep them at the same school (even if it's across town) because it's a big source of continuity and comfort for the children to have the same classroom, the same teacher, and the same friends, when everything else in their world is topsy turvy. Also, some foster situations last only a very short time - sometimes only a day or two, sometimes a few weeks, and once in awhile, months or years - and in those cases, getting started homeschooling a new child would be an immense undertaking and not do any favors to the foster parent OR the child. 

However, once a child is legally and permanently adopted, the parents should be able to choose whatever education path they want, IMO. 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 14, 2014 at 9:54 AM
2 moms liked this

One of the lovely ladies in my co-op (the arts one) has 6 foster kids in her care.  She has special permission to homeschool 2 of them.  Their progress is evaluated every 9 weeks.  They have been in foster care for the past 3 or 4 years and in those years they have pingponged from family to family and in between 3 school districts.  They were so far behind academically that when my friend stepped up to take them, she requested that she be allowed to homeschool them until she could get them up to grade level.  The Bio-Mom has finally signed away her rights to the children and my friend is working on adopting them.  But the evaluator has been completely blown away by how much progress these kids have made in such a short time (6 months so far).  

I think each and every case is different and should be treated differently.  

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jan. 14, 2014 at 10:14 AM
1 mom liked this

I agree. There is already so much upheaval that education shouldn't be changed as well...UNLESS the kids had been moved from school to school and have fallen behind. But no matter what it would mean seeking seperate permissions/evaluations. IDK if the family in the OP did that or not as it wasn't in the story. But with Tx laws being more relaxed I could see how a foster family might think they had the right to HS the fosters along w/ their own kids. But that's just opening a can of worms. I would not want that much scrutiny on my homeschool, especially in a state with no strict guideline - in such a strictly run program it's easy to show if you are following the rules, but when the rules are more nebulous it can be left open to interpretation, and that can always be a source of trouble. 

Quoting hipmomto3:

I agree, foster children should stay in their schools. I know a couple of families who foster, and they keep the children enrolled in the same public school they were in before they were removed from their homes. I don't know for sure if the law is they have to stay at the same school, or they just have to be in school, but these foster parents keep them at the same school (even if it's across town) because it's a big source of continuity and comfort for the children to have the same classroom, the same teacher, and the same friends, when everything else in their world is topsy turvy. Also, some foster situations last only a very short time - sometimes only a day or two, sometimes a few weeks, and once in awhile, months or years - and in those cases, getting started homeschooling a new child would be an immense undertaking and not do any favors to the foster parent OR the child. 

However, once a child is legally and permanently adopted, the parents should be able to choose whatever education path they want, IMO. 


celtic77dragon
by Member on Jan. 14, 2014 at 1:27 PM
1 mom liked this

I lived it for most of my childhood - in 4 states (this is unusual) and countless homes. 

It's not home. It's not family. It's not stable.  It's not the happiest of places.

School is your only reprieve - a chance to make some connections.

Even in the long term, trust me, it is NOT wise to homeschool a foster child. The ONLY connections and roots I now have from my childhood are the friends I made in public school. 

You meet a lot of of other kids while in foster care. However, they all have troubled lives. Public school kids were my only real insight to other more normal lives. 

Whatever reasons most people homeschool for - a child in foster care usually has worse things to worry about.

The psychological aspect isn't even something I could even begin to touch on here. There is the obvious and not so obvious with this. 


Quoting redhead-bedhead:

Why?

Quoting celtic77dragon:

I am VERY much AGAINST homeschooling foster kids!!!



redhead-bedhead
by Bronze Member on Jan. 14, 2014 at 3:48 PM

Ah okay. That makes a lot of sense.

Quoting celtic77dragon:

I lived it for most of my childhood - in 4 states (this is unusual) and countless homes. 

It's not home. It's not family. It's not stable.  It's not the happiest of places.

School is your only reprieve - a chance to make some connections.

Even in the long term, trust me, it is NOT wise to homeschool a foster child. The ONLY connections and roots I now have from my childhood are the friends I made in public school. 

You meet a lot of of other kids while in foster care. However, they all have troubled lives. Public school kids were my only real insight to other more normal lives. 

Whatever reasons most people homeschool for - a child in foster care usually has worse things to worry about.

The psychological aspect isn't even something I could even begin to touch on here. There is the obvious and not so obvious with this. 


Quoting redhead-bedhead:

Why?

Quoting celtic77dragon:

I am VERY much AGAINST homeschooling foster kids!!!




TidewaterClan
by on Jan. 14, 2014 at 7:39 PM

I have an Aunt who is only six months older than me.  Her mother (mom's mom) passed away at childbirth, and her aunt adopted her.  That aunt ended up passing away when she was 13.  She ended up in foster care and just from what she's said I don't think hs without strict oversight would be a good idea.

Quoting celtic77dragon:

I lived it for most of my childhood - in 4 states (this is unusual) and countless homes. 

It's not home. It's not family. It's not stable.  It's not the happiest of places.

School is your only reprieve - a chance to make some connections.

Even in the long term, trust me, it is NOT wise to homeschool a foster child. The ONLY connections and roots I now have from my childhood are the friends I made in public school. 

You meet a lot of of other kids while in foster care. However, they all have troubled lives. Public school kids were my only real insight to other more normal lives. 

Whatever reasons most people homeschool for - a child in foster care usually has worse things to worry about.

The psychological aspect isn't even something I could even begin to touch on here. There is the obvious and not so obvious with this. 


Quoting redhead-bedhead:

Why?

Quoting celtic77dragon:

I am VERY much AGAINST homeschooling foster kids!!!




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