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s/o WTM educational philosopies, educational movements, educational methods, curriculum, and textbooks.

Posted by on Jan. 18, 2014 at 12:00 PM
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2 moms liked this

For the first time during my homeschooling adventure I have felt the need to explain a few terms.  Just as I have seen people throw a hissy fit over the difference between a scientific theory and a theory in everyday life; this is my hissy fit over philosophy, movement, method, curriculum, and textbook.  

Educational philosophies are ways in which people think about education.  It is truly when a person talks about what an education SHOULD be or should be comprised of.  There are many ways of thinking about education and determining your educational philosophy.  Typically the educational philosophies can be broken down to:

Quote:

 essentialismperennialismprogressivismsocial reconstructionismcritical theory, and existentialism


There are philosophers who have already thought about their own educational philosophy and have done us the courtesy of writing them down for us.  This is a good list of educational philosophers:


Some of these philosophers and some people not on this list have begun movements (in either the public school system, the homeschool group, or more than likely in the history of education around the world).  They typically discuss their philosophy of education and sometimes even use the 4 methods of education to explain their movement.

The main few movements of education are (in order of their respective ages):

Classical Education
Contemplative Education
Humanistic Education
Critical Pedagogy
 Democratic Education
And Unschooling 

There are 4 methods of education.  Yep.  Just 4.  They are: 1) Explaining (by guiding, by lecture, or by writing a book).  2) Demonstrating (whether it is in person or on video) 3) Collaborating (allowing the students to come up with a solution on their own and only demonstrating and explaining when necessary) and finally 4) Learning by Teaching (where a student explains and demonstrates the knowledge they have acquired in order to teach others.)

Philosophers of education and even movements of education typically do not list the Methods they use to teach!


Finally when you are speaking to a public school teacher and you say that you purchase a curriculum, it is a bad thing.  Here is why:

A textbook is a group of materials including a student textbook, a teacher's manual, a workbook or 2, and a few visual aides.

A curriculum (to a public school teacher) is a giant binder that they have filled with the items they have used in and outside of the textbooks, the items they have used from the provided supplements, a list of objectives, a list of methods they have used to achieve those objectives, a list of ways they have evaluated the implementation of those objectives, and any testing material or self-created supplements they have prepared in order to meet or evaluate their objectives.  

Typically, I have never seen a homeschooling curriculum that meets the kind of minutae that a public school teacher is thinking when they hear "curriculum."  

Sorry.  Rant over.  

by on Jan. 18, 2014 at 12:00 PM
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Replies (1-10):
paganbaby
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 12:56 PM

Well now it's obvious I do not use a curriculum,lol. And I think I use all 4 methods of education. I've found that number 4, learning by teaching, is by far the best for my kids.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 1:09 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting paganbaby:

Well now it's obvious I do not use a curriculum,lol. And I think I use all 4 methods of education. I've found that number 4, learning by teaching, is by far the best for my kids.

LOL!  I think learning by teaching is how I learn the best.  I know I have learned a lot of history from teaching it to my kids.  My kids learn the best by a mix of demonstrating and collaborating.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 3:08 PM
Thanks for the info. Some of the terms were new for me. I think most teachers have not homeschooled have a lot of definitions that are vastly different than ours. Heck, it is hard to get homeschoolers to agree on definitions. It took me years to figure a definition for unschooling.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 3:12 PM


Quoting jen2150: Thanks for the info. Some of the terms were new for me. I think most teachers have not homeschooled have a lot of definitions that are vastly different than ours. Heck, it is hard to get homeschoolers to agree on definitions. It took me years to figure a definition for unschooling.

You're welcome.  It does help that I have the vocab to talk to teachers on some of the other boards who are totally against homeschooling.

Can you give me a definition for unschooling?  It seeems that everyone has their own take on it (which I am totally cool with) but it would be nice to have a definition in my back pocket!  :-)

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 3:30 PM

I'm surprised that "scholastic/traditionally scholastic" didn't make the list of top "educational movements/philosophies" - it's been the mainstay in many/most private religious schools (namely, Catholic schools) for many hundreds of years.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















jen2150
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 4:58 PM
It is kind of my own definition. I came across so many from different sources. It was very confusing. Unschooling to me is giving children choices and trusting they will learn things when the time is right. Giving them freedom to organize and structure their own days. Parent and child both take turns leading. Parents lead the most through example. Playing is a child's greatest tool for learning. I think ultimately unschooling is getting rid of all the notions that were taught in school. Kids are already programmed to learn. They need a guide not a teacher. Every child has a different journey.



Quoting bluerooffarm:


Quoting jen2150: Thanks for the info. Some of the terms were new for me. I think most teachers have not homeschooled have a lot of definitions that are vastly different than ours. Heck, it is hard to get homeschoolers to agree on definitions. It took me years to figure a definition for unschooling.

You're welcome.  It does help that I have the vocab to talk to teachers on some of the other boards who are totally against homeschooling.

Can you give me a definition for unschooling?  It seeems that everyone has their own take on it (which I am totally cool with) but it would be nice to have a definition in my back pocket!  :-)

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 5:30 PM


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I'm surprised that "scholastic/traditionally scholastic" didn't make the list of top "educational movements/philosophies" - it's been the mainstay in many/most private religious schools (namely, Catholic schools) for many hundreds of years.

I'm going to try not to go too deep here since it's Saturday and I'm sick....but...

Scholasticism is less a philosophy of learning and more a way of bringing harmony.  It focuses on reasoning that will bring harmony between two veins of learning.  (zzzzzzz) okay sorry.  Let me try again.....

The scholarmen of the ancient church (which is where most learning occured in the middle ages) tried to have their students think about all topics with dialectical reasoning. (ie reasoning that would resolve disagreement) at that time they were trying to square the teachings of Aristotle and the Neoplatonism (the newly revised Plato-nic methods).   Okay gosh darn it, I got just as boring in this try....

The Scholastic Approach to learning/teaching is used by people in many of the movements, so it is considered a basis instead of a movement of its own.  When the Classicists use rhetoric, they try to formulate arguments using dialectical reasoning.  

IMO the contemplative should not make it into most discussions of educational movements since it is mostly reserved for the University level only.  It's a rare child that can learn all necessary foundations this way.....not that I am against the Waldorf school in the slightest.  I do understand that it makes the list because of its standing in the Waldorf schools.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 5:31 PM

Cool.  To get a short blurb to use..... Unschooling changes the parent into a guide for the intellectual journey that a child chooses?  Sound right?

Quoting jen2150: It is kind of my own definition. I came across so many from different sources. It was very confusing. Unschooling to me is giving children choices and trusting they will learn things when the time is right. Giving them freedom to organize and structure their own days. Parent and child both take turns leading. Parents lead the most through example. Playing is a child's greatest tool for learning. I think ultimately unschooling is getting rid of all the notions that were taught in school. Kids are already programmed to learn. They need a guide not a teacher. Every child has a different journey.



Quoting bluerooffarm:


Quoting jen2150: Thanks for the info. Some of the terms were new for me. I think most teachers have not homeschooled have a lot of definitions that are vastly different than ours. Heck, it is hard to get homeschoolers to agree on definitions. It took me years to figure a definition for unschooling.

You're welcome.  It does help that I have the vocab to talk to teachers on some of the other boards who are totally against homeschooling.

Can you give me a definition for unschooling?  It seeems that everyone has their own take on it (which I am totally cool with) but it would be nice to have a definition in my back pocket!  :-)


celtic77dragon
by Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 9:01 PM

I think context is important.

A homeschool method is different from a teaching method in the sense you mention.

When I attended my kids last school conference and let them know that I would be homeschooling; the teachers, principal... knew what a homeschool curriculum was. My cousin and my bf who are teachers and my uncle who is professor all know what a homeschool curriculum is.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 9:06 PM


Quoting celtic77dragon:

I think context is important.

A homeschool method is different from a teaching method in the sense you mention.

When I attended my kids last school conference and let them know that I would be homeschooling; the teachers, principal... knew what a homeschool curriculum was. My cousin and my bf who are teachers and my uncle who is professor all know what a homeschool curriculum is.

Most teachers don't really know what a homeschool curriculum is, they hear curriculum and think they know.  They are often the ones that seem disgusted by homeschooling.

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