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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Does anyone teach children other than their own?

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 I don't necessarily mean as a co-op or anything like that.  I teach anatomy to my three plus two others, choir to a group of 13 and speech to a group of 11 or so.  But that's just once or twice a week.  Does anyone teach other children full time in addition to your own?

A friend of mine is considering taking on another student, and I have been approached about it when we move as well.  I'm just wondering what your thoughts are on it.

by on Jan. 26, 2014 at 6:29 PM
Replies (11-17):
Pukalani79
by Kristin on Jan. 27, 2014 at 11:33 AM

 That's kind of what I'm thinking too. 

Quoting TJandKarasMom: I don't think I would do it. In theory it sounds good, extra income, a friend for my kids....but in practice I see it being a nightmare.  
Jinx-Troublex3
by Jinx on Jan. 27, 2014 at 11:45 AM
The boy I had had been in a local Christian school. As PP mentioned, it was about $400 a month and that is what she paid me. She had him enrolled in K12, so it was more me supervising, than teaching him with my kids.

I did tell her I would give her notice on any field trips and she would be expected to pay his entry (if any) and provide lunch or lunch $ or she could keep him home that day.

Overall, it wasn't a bad experience and I would consider it again.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2014 at 12:04 PM

A couple months. In the end, while the girl child was coming along nicely (learning how to share, etc), the mom turned out to not be easy to work with (wanted to send the girl over sick, when she knew I had a medically fragile child at home, etc - things we had discussed prior to the arrangement). In the end, I gave her a month's notice and told her she would need to find someone else. I was watching the child 10-12 hours a day for what averaged out to be less than $2/hour when food was considered.

Quoting paganbaby:

How long did you end up teaching her?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















paganbaby
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Some parents are so selfish... And for less than $2 a hour for the entire day? No way!

I know I ended watching this one boy for free. His grandma was paying me $10 a day and he ended up eating and drinking that much plus more. It was ridiculous.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

A couple months. In the end, while the girl child was coming along nicely (learning how to share, etc), the mom turned out to not be easy to work with (wanted to send the girl over sick, when she knew I had a medically fragile child at home, etc - things we had discussed prior to the arrangement). In the end, I gave her a month's notice and told her she would need to find someone else. I was watching the child 10-12 hours a day for what averaged out to be less than $2/hour when food was considered.

Quoting paganbaby:

How long did you end up teaching her?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.






I will not have a temper tantrum nor stomp across the floor.


I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2014 at 12:14 PM
1 mom liked this

Yeah. In hindsight, if I were to do it again, it would be someone Nico's age (so 4 or 5)... but still, to find someone who is working at his level in different academic areas, so as not to take away from the attention he receives, someone who is Catholic and won't mind our curriuculum choices, etc would be very hard, if not impossible.

I'm too busy, regardless. With my eldest's school schedule (weeks like this one, where i'm at her school in the morning for a presentation, then P/T conferences later this week, then normal drop off/pick up, etc), normal doctor visits, etc, it just wouldn't work, especially not for that little pay. Heck, I have MY sitter working a couple times a week right now, at least, lol.

Quoting paganbaby:

Some parents are so selfish... And for less than $2 a hour for the entire day? No way!

I know I ended watching this one boy for free. His grandma was paying me $10 a day and he ended up eating and drinking that much plus more. It was ridiculous.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

A couple months. In the end, while the girl child was coming along nicely (learning how to share, etc), the mom turned out to not be easy to work with (wanted to send the girl over sick, when she knew I had a medically fragile child at home, etc - things we had discussed prior to the arrangement). In the end, I gave her a month's notice and told her she would need to find someone else. I was watching the child 10-12 hours a day for what averaged out to be less than $2/hour when food was considered.

Quoting paganbaby:

How long did you end up teaching her?

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I did at one time. I took on a 9 year old (third grader).

It was a complete disaster. She was too used to being let loose on Time 4 Learning and faking her way through the program. When I finally sat down with her, she didn't even know what the definition of a noun - she had been faking her way through the entire time. She was NOT a bad girl, but her upbringing had been completely different from the way our own household runs - she didn't know how to share, wasn't used to younger children, required my complete attention, etc.

There are so many things that need to be figured out first, before your friend gets herself into this.

First, money. How much will she charge? Most people will not pay more than less what a local private school charges. Around here, top Catholic schools only charge $500/monthly, so nobody would be willing to pay more than $400 a month, which is only $100 weekly; generally the parent in these situations work, so you have them full time (7:30-5:40 or so, roughly). The breakdown to hourly is very low.

Food. In general, the children will want to eat what you serve your own children - everything looks better than what mom packs! So you have to take that into account with pricing. The child I took on was used to processed and fast food, largely, so she gorged on the fresh fruit at my house (a good thing, but it certainly took a toll on my bottom line).

Faith differences. If you're protestant and teach young earth, for example, or with protestant materials, how are you going to handle a child coming from a secular, Catholic, or otherwise background and mom doesn't want you to use protestant materials with her child?

Time. A child not used to working with you will require a ton of your time. This is time taken from your own children.

Also, check your state laws. Many states require that parents be responsible for the majority (51%+) of core instruction.





I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















MessedUpMama
by Member on Jan. 28, 2014 at 5:49 AM

My son is in Connections Academy, so is the little girl I have in daycare. She has been with us since she was 2, she will be 7 in April. She is here 11 hours a day 5 days a week, so she is part of the family. Her Mother wouldn't mind if we went to a traditional home school situation, with or without a paid for curriculum, it's my DH that wants to stay with something more ... standard. We don't do a lot of the assignments, only the ones we have to for the portfolios, then we do other things relating to their lessons for that day. We are using a block schedule so we do Social Studies all day, or Math, Science, Language Arts. It helps keep them focused on what they are supposed to be learning. Anyway, it works out fine for us. We are all on the same schedule for sleeping and such, allowing the kids a more normal life with their working parent. They work evenings, leaving my house at 1:10 PM at the latest to catch a bus to work, then they arrive here at 12:15 AM at the latest at the end of the day. The kids can sleep when we do, and stay up to spend time with their working parent in the evenings.

Our situation is different though from what you are asking about, because she has been with us since before she started school, and it didn't change anything in our normal life. I'm not sure I could do it with a child that we weren't so close to.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2014 at 7:59 AM

I taught a child grammar last year.  It was 2 hours on Tuesday and an hour on Thursday each week.  I got $100 a month for it. Which ended up at about 8 bucks an hour.  BUT the family lives about 2 or 3 miles away and the mother would not drive.  So when the dad got home in time, they would drop him off but if the Dad did not get home, she would call 10 min before she was supposed to be there and ask if we could come to her.  I seemed to be constantly packing the lesson up.  Then there was nothing for my youngest (nearly 3 at the time) to do while we had a lesson.  At our house he had plenty to do.  She wanted us to work at the kitchen table while she worked on supper.  It was a distraction.  Since grammar is something that needs a couple days of practice, I would give homework (not much, just fixing a couple sentences or highlighting some sentences).  He would never do the homework.  She would make excuses about how they were so busy with their schoolwork, but then she would brag at church that their schoolwork only took 2 hours each day and they would spend the rest of the day just playing.

Anyway, it did not work out.  I told her I wouldn't be able to do it after Christmas last year.  She badmouthed me a bit.  Apparently I am a very mean mother because "all [my] kids do is schoolwork" LOL

I've had others ask me, but I've said I am focussing on mine right now and just can't.

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