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How long should a should a child...

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Be "UNschooled"?????? Is there a certain amount of time that is ok???
Thanks~
by on Jan. 28, 2014 at 2:43 PM
Replies (11-20):
usmom3
by BJ on Jan. 28, 2014 at 10:03 PM
1 mom liked this

 You're welcome! I have made my fair share of errors writing post so I know how easy it is to do it!

Quoting Truluv4ever: Thanks for your reply and vote of confidence!

Quoting usmom3:

 Really! So you are all perfect & have never made a mistake with writing or posting something that you did not proofread first!


Get over yourself & get out of our group!


Quoting Bwanna12Bree:

Appearantly, you had been unschoooled a little too long. How long should a should ???


 

 

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Jan. 28, 2014 at 10:09 PM

I deschooled my 14 year old for 4 months. It was a good break for all of us. My 9yo, then 8yo, deschooled over summer vacation.

DyslexiaParent
by Member on Jan. 29, 2014 at 6:31 PM

Given that I have kids with learning disabilties and work with parents' whose kids do to, the amount of time taken for deschooling can be more of an issue if a child has a learning disability.  It becomes a trade-off between deschooling and learning regression.  In other words, if a child has a learning disability, he is much more likely to lose significant ground in content he had previously learned the longer he is away from schooling.

Learning regression can be a significant issue for some kids, so much so that year-round schooling can greatly improve learning outcomes.  For us, we used what I called a "Power Hour" with my sons during the summer so they would not forget the skills they learned over the summer.  Our summer days were MUCH shorter and were a review of the previous year's skills, but the academic exposure was needed to keep them from losing ground.

Therefore, if a child has any learning challenges, rather than deschooling completely, having a very short day of "review schooling" for a number of months can give a similar mental break as deschooling would.  I like to recommend parents choose free online learning programs and have their kids work about 30 minutes on math, reading, and writing each day.. Nothing structured, but something academic so your child doesn't lose ground academically.  Given the online programs, kids often find that a fun change so it doesn't really seem like school at all.

Quoting Truluv4ever: Oops! Yes, I do mean deschool. So if you deschool for the amount of time that is recommended will that affect their grade level or their learning?? Thanks for your help~


SandyKC
M.S. Instructional Design, Veteran Homeschooling Mom of "Light of My Life" Boys,
Special Education Advocate, Author, Academic Achievement Consultant


KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jan. 29, 2014 at 6:40 PM

I think it depends on HOW you deschool. If your idea of deschooling is doing nothing but watching Cartoon Network all day, then yup it will affect grade level. But the purpose of deschooling is to basically re-program a student, to let them begin to spread their curiosity wings and discover learning can be fun. This means they Are learning - so grade level won't be affected. I always tell people to think of deschool like child-led learning. Let the kids pick something that interests them - like volcanoes, robots, whatever- and give them the tools to learn all about it. Sure they aren't following a specific grade level curricula but not all HSers do so anyway. IMO as long as a student is learning and processing then they (and you) are doing great!

Quoting Truluv4ever: Oops! Yes, I do mean deschool. So if you deschool for the amount of time that is recommended will that affect their grade level or their learning?? Thanks for your help~

Quoting usmom3:


MamaDearie
by Member on Jan. 30, 2014 at 3:17 PM
1 mom liked this

I have my own opinions about de-schooling and they tend to be quite different than many others. I do not believe it is necessary to de-school a child. You can switch gears and just get into what you want to get into with them. I think de-schooling sets up a precedent of being able to avoid anything that the child may not readily enjoy. I feel that kids need to learn how to cope with change and that they do not need massive blocks of time in order to make this transition. Just my opinion- and I know it's not a popular one.

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I am a conservative Christian homeschooling mama of 3 who believes strongly in traditional families and traditional roles. 

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Jan. 30, 2014 at 7:08 PM
2 moms liked this

That's an interesting opinion. I love that HSing allows for customization - so each family can do what works for them. I'm glad I didn't have to worry about deschooling as we always HS'ed.

I think the only thing that jumped out at me, in your reply, was deschooling as a means of avoiding things they might not enjoy. I have always viewed deschooling as a time to change the 'programming' of a child from one viewing learning as a painful, torturous event, to something enjoyable even exciting. But I also think LEARNING is an important part of the deschooling process. That it should not be a time for bumming around.

Quoting MamaDearie:

I have my own opinions about de-schooling and they tend to be quite different than many others. I do not believe it is necessary to de-school a child. You can switch gears and just get into what you want to get into with them. I think de-schooling sets up a precedent of being able to avoid anything that the child may not readily enjoy. I feel that kids need to learn how to cope with change and that they do not need massive blocks of time in order to make this transition. Just my opinion- and I know it's not a popular one.


Truluv4ever
by Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 10:28 AM
Thanks for your reply! You make an interesting point, thanks for the advice!

Quoting MamaDearie:

I have my own opinions about de-schooling and they tend to be quite different than many others. I do not believe it is necessary to de-school a child. You can switch gears and just get into what you want to get into with them. I think de-schooling sets up a precedent of being able to avoid anything that the child may not readily enjoy. I feel that kids need to learn how to cope with change and that they do not need massive blocks of time in order to make this transition. Just my opinion- and I know it's not a popular one.

Truluv4ever
by Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 10:31 AM
1 mom liked this
I do agree with you about changing the way kids view learning. Thankfully homeschooling is so customizable!

Quoting KickButtMama:

That's an interesting opinion. I love that HSing allows for customization - so each family can do what works for them. I'm glad I didn't have to worry about deschooling as we always HS'ed.

I think the only thing that jumped out at me, in your reply, was deschooling as a means of avoiding things they might not enjoy. I have always viewed deschooling as a time to change the 'programming' of a child from one viewing learning as a painful, torturous event, to something enjoyable even exciting. But I also think LEARNING is an important part of the deschooling process. That it should not be a time for bumming around.

Quoting MamaDearie:

I have my own opinions about de-schooling and they tend to be quite different than many others. I do not believe it is necessary to de-school a child. You can switch gears and just get into what you want to get into with them. I think de-schooling sets up a precedent of being able to avoid anything that the child may not readily enjoy. I feel that kids need to learn how to cope with change and that they do not need massive blocks of time in order to make this transition. Just my opinion- and I know it's not a popular one.


MamaDearie
by Member on Feb. 1, 2014 at 8:26 AM

I think perhaps my perspective comes from having a child who left public school because he wanted to learn more- not because he found learning to be a painful process.  He was bored in school. He wanted more challenging work and wanted to be able to work at a faster pace. He never wanted any downtime and we really haven't ever had any- lol. 

I think there tends to be an assumption that many kids are removed from public school in order to be homeschooled because they were struggling academically in public or private school and/or they were struggling socially in school. Neither of those situations apply to us so my views tend to differ from alot of the other homeschooling parents I have met.

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I am a conservative Christian homeschooling mama of 3 who believes strongly in traditional families and traditional roles. 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Feb. 1, 2014 at 8:55 AM
Apparently you have never had a mistake happen when writing or e-mailing or posting.


Quoting Bwanna12Bree:

Appearantly, you had been unschoooled a little too long. How long should a should ???

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