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Little Reported Black & Women American Heroes

Posted by on Jan. 30, 2014 at 12:47 PM
  • 2 Replies

Several important pieces of history are missing from many modern textbooks disrespecting the history of blacks and women. Many of our Founding Fathers and Revolutionary heroes were women and black men. But we hear little about that.

· In some states, blacks were voting well before 1965.
State constitutions protecting voting rights for blacks included those of Delaware (1776), Maryland (1776), New Hampshire (1784), and New York (1777). (Constitution signer Rufus King declared that in New York, “a citizen of color was entitled to all the privileges of a citizen. . . . [and] entitled to vote.”) Pennsylvania also extended such rights in her 1776 constitution, as did Massachusetts in her 1780 constitution.

·
Joseph Hayne Rainey, a black man, served in the House Of Representatives from 1870–1879. He was a Republican representing his State of South Carolina. In fact we had several black representatives, and revolutionary heroes.

· A heroic African American rode with Paul Revere that famous night. He is found in the older documents, but now written out of the history books. His name is Wentworth Cheswell

· Between 1775 and 1807, the state constitution Of New Jersey permitted all persons worth over fifty pounds to vote. Free blacks and single women were technically enfranchised under this provision. In 1870 the 15th Amendment was passed that gave former slaves the right to vote. It was education and the ability to read that advanced voting rights proving the importance of a good education.

·
Some of our Founding fathers participated in the underground railroad to free slaves.

We have all heard about Paul Revere, George Washington, and Patric Henery...all whte men. But what about the many women who were Revolutionary heroes... women like Abagail Adams, Esther Reed, Rebecca Motte, and many others? What about the many black revolutionary heroes... men like Phillip Abbot, Jack Arabus, and many more?

· Does it not seem strange to you that these important people are not in our history text books today. What happened to the truth?

That is a most interesting story. Many changes took place after the passing of our Founding Fathers. But, major changes began under Woodrow Wilson, who established the Federal Reserve, attempted the League Of Nations (a precursor to the United Nations), and implemented the 16th and 17th amendments. He believed in segregation and that blacks were inferior. Woodrow Wilson ousted all of the elected black leaders in government, and began a powerful movement to rewrite history. There was a large uprising of public objections. He was not a popular President. Yet that is not in modern text books either.

If you know more of little known, but important history, please share them in the comment section.   

by on Jan. 30, 2014 at 12:47 PM
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Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Jan. 30, 2014 at 12:57 PM
1 mom liked this

While in Biloxi we got a book in the women of the Civil War.  It's awesome to read about that part of the war and know better about them.

usmom3
by BJ on Jan. 30, 2014 at 1:09 PM
1 mom liked this

 This is why I don't like text books because they leave out so much & only put in the things the author thinks are important or to run their agenda what ever that may be!

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