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Home Schooling My Autistic DS? ?

Posted by on Feb. 27, 2014 at 3:26 AM
  • 23 Replies

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My DS is in pre-k public school right now but I want to start home schooling him starting next year due to absences and other issues with school. I live in San Antonio Texas and have already checked out the state laws. If I'm letting him finish out the school year and he's just not going back next year do I need to do any withdrawal paperwork? Any moms home schooling an autistic child have advice or information? How do I make sure to cover all the basics I am required to do? How is testing done to make sure your on track? Any other information is welcome TIA
by on Feb. 27, 2014 at 3:26 AM
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Jenn8604
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:09 AM
I'm not in Texas so i have no clue on state requirements for anything.

About schooling: if he has sensory issues sensory breaks are a MUST for our kids. Trampoline, rocking chair, swing, squeezing, something to get input and output when he is upset and getting sensory overload. Sometimes just the school work can be too much and
their brains get overloaded and they need an outlet.
My son does better with work sheets than with a book. The pages get pulled out along the dotted lines. He still needs help repositioning his pencil so he has a fat Ticonderoga pencil to help with his grip. He has to learn to count to 100 here in IL by the end of kindergarten. We have sensory counting boards for that. They also need to know how to write their ABC's and know the sounds they make and their sight words and be able to read simple sentences and spell short words and add and subtract small numbers like 4 +5=9. So far we haven't hit past adding to 20, or subtracting from it. I just am using simple kindergarten workbooks from Walmart. Don't forget to practice handwriting. It may be obsolete after 4th grade in the public schools and everything is on computer or iPad (here they are there's been big articles in the paper about it.), but good handwriting is always valuable.
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Jenn8604
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:14 AM
1 mom liked this

Great way to learn to count.
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Jenn8604
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:15 AM
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Random objects for each number to touch while counting.
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Jenn8604
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:16 AM
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These are the only ones I ever got around to taking pictures of. But it gives you ideas for different things to use.
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sweet_ashes2209
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:31 AM
c. Home schools must be conducted in a bona fide manner, using a written curriculum consisting of reading, spelling, grammar, math and a course in good citizenship; no other requirements apply.

This ^^^ is what the law states but I don't understand how much per grade level like you told me about your DS requirements. My son uses the big pencils as well and we do writing now even though he just wants to do his own thing. I have to guid his hand myself to get the work done.

Quoting Jenn8604: I'm not in Texas so i have no clue on state requirements for anything.

About schooling: if he has sensory issues sensory breaks are a MUST for our kids. Trampoline, rocking chair, swing, squeezing, something to get input and output when he is upset and getting sensory overload. Sometimes just the school work can be too much and
their brains get overloaded and they need an outlet.
My son does better with work sheets than with a book. The pages get pulled out along the dotted lines. He still needs help repositioning his pencil so he has a fat Ticonderoga pencil to help with his grip. He has to learn to count to 100 here in IL by the end of kindergarten. We have sensory counting boards for that. They also need to know how to write their ABC's and know the sounds they make and their sight words and be able to read simple sentences and spell short words and add and subtract small numbers like 4 +5=9. So far we haven't hit past adding to 20, or subtracting from it. I just am using simple kindergarten workbooks from Walmart. Don't forget to practice handwriting. It may be obsolete after 4th grade in the public schools and everything is on computer or iPad (here they are there's been big articles in the paper about it.), but good handwriting is always valuable.
sweet_ashes2209
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 4:34 AM
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Those are great and my DS loves counting. Everything we do he is counting the number of like the cars he's playing with or how many chicken nuggets he has.

Quoting Jenn8604:

These are the only ones I ever got around to taking pictures of. But it gives you ideas for different things to use.
romacox
by Silver Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 7:09 AM
3 moms liked this


He is a handsome boy...

Texas is one of the friendlies home school states.   You have a Southeast Texas Home School Association.  Be sure to check out their Beginners and Legal section.  The also have a section for support groups, which are most knowledgeable, and willing to help.

Jacob Barnett a teen with Asbergers.  He was in private school where his mom watched him regressing.  She finally decided to home school, and noticed he was fascinated with patterns.  She let this be her guide in teaching him.  He flourished, and he is now recognized to have an IQ higher than Einstein.  So Autism does not have to be as debilitating as authorities make it out to be, and they can flourish with home education.  Learn more about him at the following links (includes a video of Jacob speaking).

Video Of Jacob Speaking.....(be sure to open the information below the video)

Jacobs Place is a Facebook page to dispel myths about the spectrum.

A word From His Mom (a book too)

Jenn8604
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 8:50 AM
1 mom liked this
Then just go with the books from Walmart. Or any other place they sell them cheap. The dollar store or something. My mom did the Brainquest with my niece for prek and she loved her book and is already finished with it. I am having ds doing the big workbook from school zone with 320 pages. Plus a few smaller books.
Walmart's books written, has some reading, spelling, grammar, and math, and shouldn't teaching him basic manners count as a a course in good citizenship? Because NO ONE HAS MANNERS THESE DAYS!!!!!!!


Quoting sweet_ashes2209: c. Home schools must be conducted in a bona fide manner, using a written curriculum consisting of reading, spelling, grammar, math and a course in good citizenship; no other requirements apply.

This ^^^ is what the law states but I don't understand how much per grade level like you told me about your DS requirements. My son uses the big pencils as well and we do writing now even though he just wants to do his own thing. I have to guid his hand myself to get the work done.

Quoting Jenn8604: I'm not in Texas so i have no clue on state requirements for anything.

About schooling: if he has sensory issues sensory breaks are a MUST for our kids. Trampoline, rocking chair, swing, squeezing, something to get input and output when he is upset and getting sensory overload. Sometimes just the school work can be too much and
their brains get overloaded and they need an outlet.
My son does better with work sheets than with a book. The pages get pulled out along the dotted lines. He still needs help repositioning his pencil so he has a fat Ticonderoga pencil to help with his grip. He has to learn to count to 100 here in IL by the end of kindergarten. We have sensory counting boards for that. They also need to know how to write their ABC's and know the sounds they make and their sight words and be able to read simple sentences and spell short words and add and subtract small numbers like 4 +5=9. So far we haven't hit past adding to 20, or subtracting from it. I just am using simple kindergarten workbooks from Walmart. Don't forget to practice handwriting. It may be obsolete after 4th grade in the public schools and everything is on computer or iPad (here they are there's been big articles in the paper about it.), but good handwriting is always valuable.
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usmom3
by BJ on Feb. 27, 2014 at 12:32 PM
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 Hi & welcome to the group! I am in Texas so I have an understanding of the laws! You can & should work at his pace, if that is much slower then the public schools that is perfectly fine! Because there is no testing or reporting required in our state I always encourage homeschoolers here to find creative ways to learn what their children know & what they need to work on rather then giving them conventional tests!

 I have 2 sons that are Autistic one is 20y/o he still lives at home because he has major social anxiety & a heart condition he was born with that requires medication. My other son is 8y/o, we work on things at his own pace! So somethings he is behind & others far advanced!

Because your son was attending the public school you should give them a letter of intent ether at the end of this year or at the beginning of next! If you had never sent him you would never have to contact them to let them know you are homeschooling!

This http://www.thsc.org/ is the Texas Homeschool Coalition website. You can print out a generic letter of intent to use to give to the school(I used it for my oldest when I pulled him out of public school at the age of 12). They also have links for all the homeschool support groups & co-ops in Texas.

I hope this helps & good luck!

sweet_ashes2209
by Member on Feb. 27, 2014 at 5:06 PM
Awesome thanks so much! I will hand in the letter at the end of the school year. So I don't have to make sure he knows things (like count to 100 by the end of kindergarten) by the end of the school year? Just go over all the subjects and progress at his pace?

Quoting usmom3:

 Hi & welcome to the group! I am in Texas so I have an understanding of the laws! You can & should work at his pace, if that is much slower then the public schools that is perfectly fine! Because there is no testing or reporting required in our state I always encourage homeschoolers here to find creative ways to learn what their children know & what they need to work on rather then giving them conventional tests!


 I have 2 sons that are Autistic one is 20y/o he still lives at home because he has major social anxiety & a heart condition he was born with that requires medication. My other son is 8y/o, we work on things at his own pace! So somethings he is behind & others far advanced!


Because your son was attending the public school you should give them a letter of intent ether at the end of this year or at the beginning of next! If you had never sent him you would never have to contact them to let them know you are homeschooling!


This http://www.thsc.org/ is the Texas Homeschool Coalition website. You can print out a generic letter of intent to use to give to the school(I used it for my oldest when I pulled him out of public school at the age of 12). They also have links for all the homeschool support groups & co-ops in Texas.


I hope this helps & good luck!

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