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No Shaved Heads! (apparently)

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I'm actually a fan of dress codes in schools. I grew up in urban areas where lots of bullying because of what people were wearing happened daily. When homeschool is not an option, then I think schools should be a place of focused learning, not their idea of 'social judgement.'

But, recently I think things have gone too far. One post today (in our group) was about leggings being banned for distracting boys.....eh...I don't get it...but this? I think this is INSANE (and sick). A girl was suspended because she shaved her head because her best friend went bald due to her chemo treatment for cancer. I think that is such a beautiful thing. But apparently having lovely locks is a requirement for her school! What about the cancer patient, would they suspend her too? 

What do you think?

Girl Suspended Temporarily For Shaving Head

 

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - A Colorado girl who shaved her head to support a friend who went bald because of cancer treatment was told she violated her school's dress code but will now be allowed to stay in class.

Kamryn Renfro, 9, of Grand Junction shaved her head to help friend Delaney Clements get through chemotherapy. Kamryn at first wasn't allowed to return to classes at Caprock Academy, the charter school she attends.

The academy later said she could return, and the school's board of directors met Tuesday evening and voted 3-1 to let her come back.

The (Grand Junction) Daily Sentinel reported that the school board's chairwoman had said that the school's the dress code is designed to promote uniformity and a non-distracting environment. She said exceptions can be made under extraordinary circumstances. The board voted Tuesday night to make Kamryn an exception.

Kamryn's friend Delaney, 12, has been battling cancer for years, and said sometimes her bald head made her stand out, reported CBS affiliate KREX in Grand Junction.

"People would sometimes call me a boy even though I was all dressed in pink," said Delaney.

Kamryn said shaving her head for her friend wasn't hard.

"I did it so she didn't have to feel left out," Kamryn said.

On Monday, Kamryn spent the day on the playground instead of her classroom, all because she violated school policy. Her mother says she emailed school officials explaining why the 9-year-old shaved her head, but received a call saying Kamryn could not come back to school.

"I was really excited that I would have somebody to support me and I wouldn't be alone with people always laughing at me," Delaney said. "I just want to say thank you for being a really good friend and actually being brave enough to do it, and not only caring about your hair."

by on Mar. 26, 2014 at 5:37 PM
Replies (11-20):
KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 26, 2014 at 7:18 PM

OMG, both those stories break my heart...and make me thankful that we homeschool.

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom was a clinic aid when the zero tolerance for drugs came about.  She honestly knew a student who was sent to rehab with the actual druggies for carrying Midol.  Brilliant.  What's the number one way to get involved in drugs?  Know who has 'em and where to get 'em.  Let's congratulate those administrators for introducing people who may not have known each other!

I also read about a school nurse who closed the clinic and locked the door because the student didn't have a signed note for his inhaler.  He was outside her door dying.  That's what zero tolerance does.  It binds hands.  Takes away thought.  It's an enabler.  Laws can't be written perfectly, that's why we're supposed to use our brains.

Quoting KickButtMama:

Lol, I think Midol is still a medicine. I was talking with my friends teen daughter the other day and I said how I had my Motrin 'horse pills' prescription in my purse throughout Highschool because I suffered from headaches and back pain. She was amazed that I was arrested for carrying around my own prescription when she couldn't even bring 2 Tylenol tablets.

Quoting hwblyf:

Well and honestly, what is zero tolerance teaching anyone?  That our school personnel can't be trusted to tell the difference between a pop tart gun and a real gun.  That expressing anger and frustration is taboo, that Midol and cocaine are equivalent, and you'd better not be different than the crowd.  Because as we all know, mob mentality is best, so go with the mob.

Is Midol even a medicine any more, or am I that old?

 

hwblyf
by Silver Member on Mar. 26, 2014 at 7:24 PM

And what really bothers me is that they honestly feel it's in the best interest....

Quoting KickButtMama:

OMG, both those stories break my heart...and make me thankful that we homeschool.

Quoting hwblyf:

My mom was a clinic aid when the zero tolerance for drugs came about.  She honestly knew a student who was sent to rehab with the actual druggies for carrying Midol.  Brilliant.  What's the number one way to get involved in drugs?  Know who has 'em and where to get 'em.  Let's congratulate those administrators for introducing people who may not have known each other!

I also read about a school nurse who closed the clinic and locked the door because the student didn't have a signed note for his inhaler.  He was outside her door dying.  That's what zero tolerance does.  It binds hands.  Takes away thought.  It's an enabler.  Laws can't be written perfectly, that's why we're supposed to use our brains.

chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Mar. 26, 2014 at 7:38 PM
I'm glad I homeschool. The schools are getting ridiculous. If the little girl cannot shave her hread; how about the boys? What about the boys who wear skinny jeans; will they not be allowed to wear them since the girls can't wear leggings? Sexist and ridiculous!





 



 


 

PinkButterfly66
by on Mar. 26, 2014 at 7:41 PM

They caved and reversed their decision as they should have -- it was an asshole move.

DENVER -- The mother of a Grand Junction third-grader who shaved her head in solidarity with a cancer-stricken friend is asking for an end to the national furor over a school's short-lived decision to bar the girl from campus so the focus can shift to the recovery of her 11-year-old friend.

The board of directors of the charter school, the Caprock Academy, voted Tuesday to let Kamryn Renfro remain. Officials had earlier barred her, saying she violated the dress code by shaving her head over the weekend.

The Denver Post reported Wednesday that Kamryn's mother, Jamie Olson Renfro, took her daughter to Denver Tuesday to be with her friend ahead of a hospital visit. Olson Renfro called on people who have been following the story to think of Delaney Clements, who has been fighting childhood cancer since she was 7.

"Delaney is still in the fight of her life, and needs as much love, support and prayers as she can get," Olson Renfro told the Post.

Delaney, bald from chemotherapy, told the Post that having friends willing to shave their heads made it easier to withstand teasing about her appearance.

"It feels good to have my friends be there for me and to know I am not alone," she said.

Olson Renfro also wrote on Facebook that Caprock was supportive of her daughter throughout the process that ended with Tuesday's board vote.

The board voted 3-1 to grant Kamryn a waiver from the dress code, The Daily Sentinel reported Wednesday. Two uniformed Grand Junction Police officers were on hand at the special meeting for the vote. Police Chief John Camper said police saw no specific threat, but offered to send officers because emotions were high and the events have received considerable attention.

School officials said administrators were correct to act against Kamryn until the school board was able to vote on a personal exception for her, CBS Grand Junction affiliate KREX-TV reports.

"We're a classical education school. We would expect our students to engage in critical thinking, and sometimes that's going to be challenging us," Chairwoman Catherine Norton Breman said.

Breman began the special meeting by telling the audience of about 20 people, most of them teachers and reporters, that Kamryn's motivation was "commendable."

The board member who voted against the waiver, Bill Newcomer, said "emotionally charged" decisions should be avoided.

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Mar. 26, 2014 at 8:11 PM

They really do.

Quoting somuchlove4U: I don't agree with them suspending her. Schools need to lighten up a little.




I will not have a temper tantrum nor stomp across the floor.


I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














paganbaby
by Silver Member on Mar. 26, 2014 at 8:12 PM
1 mom liked this

Good!

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

They caved and reversed their decision as they should have -- it was an asshole move.

DENVER -- The mother of a Grand Junction third-grader who shaved her head in solidarity with a cancer-stricken friend is asking for an end to the national furor over a school's short-lived decision to bar the girl from campus so the focus can shift to the recovery of her 11-year-old friend.

The board of directors of the charter school, the Caprock Academy, voted Tuesday to let Kamryn Renfro remain. Officials had earlier barred her, saying she violated the dress code by shaving her head over the weekend.

The Denver Post reported Wednesday that Kamryn's mother, Jamie Olson Renfro, took her daughter to Denver Tuesday to be with her friend ahead of a hospital visit. Olson Renfro called on people who have been following the story to think of Delaney Clements, who has been fighting childhood cancer since she was 7.

"Delaney is still in the fight of her life, and needs as much love, support and prayers as she can get," Olson Renfro told the Post.

Delaney, bald from chemotherapy, told the Post that having friends willing to shave their heads made it easier to withstand teasing about her appearance.

"It feels good to have my friends be there for me and to know I am not alone," she said.

Olson Renfro also wrote on Facebook that Caprock was supportive of her daughter throughout the process that ended with Tuesday's board vote.

The board voted 3-1 to grant Kamryn a waiver from the dress code, The Daily Sentinel reported Wednesday. Two uniformed Grand Junction Police officers were on hand at the special meeting for the vote. Police Chief John Camper said police saw no specific threat, but offered to send officers because emotions were high and the events have received considerable attention.

School officials said administrators were correct to act against Kamryn until the school board was able to vote on a personal exception for her, CBS Grand Junction affiliate KREX-TV reports.

"We're a classical education school. We would expect our students to engage in critical thinking, and sometimes that's going to be challenging us," Chairwoman Catherine Norton Breman said.

Breman began the special meeting by telling the audience of about 20 people, most of them teachers and reporters, that Kamryn's motivation was "commendable."

The board member who voted against the waiver, Bill Newcomer, said "emotionally charged" decisions should be avoided.




I will not have a temper tantrum nor stomp across the floor.


I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 26, 2014 at 10:31 PM

 I know, (and agree it was an a-hole move) I just think it's rediculous that they had to call a board of ed meeting to discuss whether or not this compassionate child be allowed back to classes or not....

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

They caved and reversed their decision as they should have -- it was an asshole move.

DENVER -- The mother of a Grand Junction third-grader who shaved her head in solidarity with a cancer-stricken friend is asking for an end to the national furor over a school's short-lived decision to bar the girl from campus so the focus can shift to the recovery of her 11-year-old friend.

The board of directors of the charter school, the Caprock Academy, voted Tuesday to let Kamryn Renfro remain. Officials had earlier barred her, saying she violated the dress code by shaving her head over the weekend.

The Denver Post reported Wednesday that Kamryn's mother, Jamie Olson Renfro, took her daughter to Denver Tuesday to be with her friend ahead of a hospital visit. Olson Renfro called on people who have been following the story to think of Delaney Clements, who has been fighting childhood cancer since she was 7.

"Delaney is still in the fight of her life, and needs as much love, support and prayers as she can get," Olson Renfro told the Post.

Delaney, bald from chemotherapy, told the Post that having friends willing to shave their heads made it easier to withstand teasing about her appearance.

"It feels good to have my friends be there for me and to know I am not alone," she said.

Olson Renfro also wrote on Facebook that Caprock was supportive of her daughter throughout the process that ended with Tuesday's board vote.

The board voted 3-1 to grant Kamryn a waiver from the dress code, The Daily Sentinel reported Wednesday. Two uniformed Grand Junction Police officers were on hand at the special meeting for the vote. Police Chief John Camper said police saw no specific threat, but offered to send officers because emotions were high and the events have received considerable attention.

School officials said administrators were correct to act against Kamryn until the school board was able to vote on a personal exception for her, CBS Grand Junction affiliate KREX-TV reports.

"We're a classical education school. We would expect our students to engage in critical thinking, and sometimes that's going to be challenging us," Chairwoman Catherine Norton Breman said.

Breman began the special meeting by telling the audience of about 20 people, most of them teachers and reporters, that Kamryn's motivation was "commendable."

The board member who voted against the waiver, Bill Newcomer, said "emotionally charged" decisions should be avoided.

 

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Mar. 26, 2014 at 10:33 PM

 Completely Agree!!!! What a way to teach double standards! Or it's like encouraging the alienation of those who have to be different through no choice of their own. The friend with cancer wasn't kicked out of class, so it's ok but she has to be the only one? What a way to teach togetherness..

Quoting chotovec82: I'm glad I homeschool. The schools are getting ridiculous. If the little girl cannot shave her hread; how about the boys? What about the boys who wear skinny jeans; will they not be allowed to wear them since the girls can't wear leggings? Sexist and ridiculous!

 

kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 26, 2014 at 10:38 PM
The board should never had to vote in the first place! They should have supported the young girl's support of her friend. Period.



Quoting PinkButterfly66:

They caved and reversed their decision as they should have -- it was an asshole move.

DENVER -- The mother of a Grand Junction third-grader who shaved her head in solidarity with a cancer-stricken friend is asking for an end to the national furor over a school's short-lived decision to bar the girl from campus so the focus can shift to the recovery of her 11-year-old friend.

The board of directors of the charter school, the Caprock Academy, voted Tuesday to let Kamryn Renfro remain. Officials had earlier barred her, saying she violated the dress code by shaving her head over the weekend.

The Denver Post reported Wednesday that Kamryn's mother, Jamie Olson Renfro, took her daughter to Denver Tuesday to be with her friend ahead of a hospital visit. Olson Renfro called on people who have been following the story to think of Delaney Clements, who has been fighting childhood cancer since she was 7.

"Delaney is still in the fight of her life, and needs as much love, support and prayers as she can get," Olson Renfro told the Post.

Delaney, bald from chemotherapy, told the Post that having friends willing to shave their heads made it easier to withstand teasing about her appearance.

"It feels good to have my friends be there for me and to know I am not alone," she said.

Olson Renfro also wrote on Facebook that Caprock was supportive of her daughter throughout the process that ended with Tuesday's board vote.

The board voted 3-1 to grant Kamryn a waiver from the dress code, The Daily Sentinel reported Wednesday. Two uniformed Grand Junction Police officers were on hand at the special meeting for the vote. Police Chief John Camper said police saw no specific threat, but offered to send officers because emotions were high and the events have received considerable attention.

School officials said administrators were correct to act against Kamryn until the school board was able to vote on a personal exception for her, CBS Grand Junction affiliate KREX-TV reports.

"We're a classical education school. We would expect our students to engage in critical thinking, and sometimes that's going to be challenging us," Chairwoman Catherine Norton Breman said.

Breman began the special meeting by telling the audience of about 20 people, most of them teachers and reporters, that Kamryn's motivation was "commendable."

The board member who voted against the waiver, Bill Newcomer, said "emotionally charged" decisions should be avoided.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 26, 2014 at 10:43 PM
I am so glad that we homeschool! To have to put a focus on stuff like this instead of learning is just plain wrong.
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