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I've been using Math U See with my daughter so far, and she loves it. She was struggling in math after we had pulled her out of PS but now she is excelling at it, and its taking about 5 min on average for her to get the worksheet for the day done, unless it's a 6 digit divided by 4 digit...those take hours...she gets them right but she does it sooo sloooow lol. 
Anyway, I started using Math U See with my little guy, and this year alone he finished the Primer, and is more than half way through the Alpha book. This is in just 1 yr! He is FLYING through this. I've heard that Singapore Math is a little harder, but I've got some reservations on it -  mainly its common core alignments. I didn't switch when Math U See "switched" but I noticed very little change from what it was before it made the switch and then after it made the switch (really it looked like it was just the enrichment pages...nothing in the scope and sequence seemed to change). I don't know how much of a switch there is with Singapore Math though, and all of the 7-11 grades are no longer being made "not" alligned. (I know these books are higher than what the kids need now, but I'm doing all the research now).
I'm thinking of just sticking with Math U See with my daughter since looking at what she knows now, I feel if I switched, she'd be at the 3rd book of Singapore, which is kind of a blow to her... But if I switch my little guy now, he'd be just fine with the K book. Neither of the kids use the blocks ever when doing their math. Riley just wants to play with them...make planes mostly... he doesn't ever use them to help with counting.

For those of you who use Singapore, do you and the kids like it? Is it a little more challenging? Do I need to worry about it being "common core" or was it basically the same before the "switch"? Is the teacher manual worth getting?
I'm also confused on the whole A & B thing. Is A first semster and B second semester?  Whats the difference between Standard and non standard? I get that the workbook is where they do all the work, do they need the text book too, or is that more for the classroom setting?  

I know its a lot of questions. Thank you in advanced :)  

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by on Mar. 28, 2014 at 10:47 AM
Replies (11-20):
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 6:36 PM

Would it be easy to group say all the adding at one time...so skip around the book instead of switching back and forth constantly?  I agree entirely about teaching it multiple times over, which is why I prefer more of a mastery approach versus a spiral method.... I noticed the kiddos learn better that way too. 

Quoting JasonsMom2007: It would touch on multiplication for one page, the next would be on division, then the next went back to addition (reteaching because they never mastered it the first time around) then to fractions, then back to teaching multiplication (once again it had barely been touched the first time). There wasn't time to learn one thing it was all over the place! Could just be the California edition but I hated it. Why teach the same thing 10 times??
Quoting No_Difference:

Both my kids are visual learners, and from the few samples I saw it looked like something that would catch interest for them, although, I'm thinking about it just for my little guy. How did it jump around though? Did it start one thing, and then skip randomly to a different topic? 

Quoting JasonsMom2007: We tried primary mathematics (the California edition). We hated it! It skips all over the place and it's very bright and visual. My son is not a visual learner.


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bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 6:58 PM

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)

No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 7:08 PM
1 mom liked this

I would only be "switching" with my little guy, who technically would be K next year anyway. I'm sticking with MUS with Jamie since I don't want any gaps with her. 
I know he's learning but I don't want to have to purchase two books again. I've printed off worksheets from the Beta book, and he was breezing through those too which is leading me to believe he'll fly through Beta, and then I'll have to start him on Gamma book, where he'll finally slow the heck down for a little bit anyway...though he has started multiplying already too.... I just can't afford to keep going through so many books a year with him :/  
I know challenging is on a personal basis. I was trying to use the term loosely.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)


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JasonsMom2007
by Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 7:10 PM
It was just overwhelming for me. And it's not like they frequently went back to anything. They touched on multiplication once in the book we had. That's it! We used a different charter school last year and his mentor insisted we try it. But because it's spiral he had to go from the third grade book all of the way back to kindergarten! They also teach everything a different way and it was frustrating for him to have to relearn things just to use a different method to do the same thing. And there were a lot of extra steps and such too to do a simple thing.

Quoting No_Difference:

Would it be easy to group say all the adding at one time...so skip around the book instead of switching back and forth constantly?  I agree entirely about teaching it multiple times over, which is why I prefer more of a mastery approach versus a spiral method.... I noticed the kiddos learn better that way too. 

Quoting JasonsMom2007: It would touch on multiplication for one page, the next would be on division, then the next went back to addition (reteaching because they never mastered it the first time around) then to fractions, then back to teaching multiplication (once again it had barely been touched the first time). There wasn't time to learn one thing it was all over the place!
Could just be the California edition but I hated it. Why teach the same thing 10 times??

Quoting No_Difference:

Both my kids are visual learners, and from the few samples I saw it looked like something that would catch interest for them, although, I'm thinking about it just for my little guy. How did it jump around though? Did it start one thing, and then skip randomly to a different topic? 

Quoting JasonsMom2007: We tried primary mathematics (the California edition). We hated it! It skips all over the place and it's very bright and visual. My son is not a visual learner.

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 7:11 PM

The affordability of flying through the books, I totally understand.

Quoting No_Difference:

I would only be "switching" with my little guy, who technically would be K next year anyway. I'm sticking with MUS with Jamie since I don't want any gaps with her. I know he's learning but I don't want to have to purchase two books again. I've printed off worksheets from the Beta book, and he was breezing through those too which is leading me to believe he'll fly through Beta, and then I'll have to start him on Gamma book, where he'll finally slow the heck down for a little bit anyway...though he has started multiplying already too.... I just can't afford to keep going through so many books a year with him :/  I know challenging is on a personal basis. I was trying to use the term loosely.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)


JasonsMom2007
by Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 7:15 PM
Can you give him extra practice then? Mine slowed down at gamma. We did a lot of extra math games and such to practice instead of just relying on the books. I felt it had caught up to where he needed to be.
We do extra word problems, projects, and real life things as well. The other day we were shopping so he found the area, perimeter, total number, and how many we each could have of a pack of water bottles we were buying. He found the average amount of water bottles in 3 different packs as well.

Quoting No_Difference:

I would only be "switching" with my little guy, who technically would be K next year anyway. I'm sticking with MUS with Jamie since I don't want any gaps with her. I know he's learning but I don't want to have to purchase two books again. I've printed off worksheets from the Beta book, and he was breezing through those too which is leading me to believe he'll fly through Beta, and then I'll have to start him on Gamma book, where he'll finally slow the heck down for a little bit anyway...though he has started multiplying already too.... I just can't afford to keep going through so many books a year with him :/  I know challenging is on a personal basis. I was trying to use the term loosely.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)

No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 8:18 PM

We do extra practice. When we go shopping, he writes down the prices, and adds them together as we go through the store. Even with decimals, he's still getting it. I haven't done averages with him yet, although I wouldn't be surprised if he could grasp that concept easily. If he wants to play with the skylanders, he has to answer either a spelling or math problem... He helps with cooking all the time so gets practice in there too... I would expect he'd slow down at gamma. I'd be amazed if he didn't. He's turning 5 next week friday. I just think multiplication, even though he already has all the skip counting down, is going to slow him down a lot more than adding and subtracting. It's still the cost of having to go through so many books in a year... On the up side, we have the teachers manual from gamma from when my oldest used it, so it'd just be buying the workbook.... 

I'm probably over thinking all of this too, but I can't help it :/  

Quoting JasonsMom2007: Can you give him extra practice then? Mine slowed down at gamma. We did a lot of extra math games and such to practice instead of just relying on the books. I felt it had caught up to where he needed to be. We do extra word problems, projects, and real life things as well. The other day we were shopping so he found the area, perimeter, total number, and how many we each could have of a pack of water bottles we were buying. He found the average amount of water bottles in 3 different packs as well.
Quoting No_Difference:

I would only be "switching" with my little guy, who technically would be K next year anyway. I'm sticking with MUS with Jamie since I don't want any gaps with her. I know he's learning but I don't want to have to purchase two books again. I've printed off worksheets from the Beta book, and he was breezing through those too which is leading me to believe he'll fly through Beta, and then I'll have to start him on Gamma book, where he'll finally slow the heck down for a little bit anyway...though he has started multiplying already too.... I just can't afford to keep going through so many books a year with him :/  I know challenging is on a personal basis. I was trying to use the term loosely.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)


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KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:51 PM
Just an observation. My kids switched to math u see this year. They were gamma and zeta.

They flew through the first third of the book and I was thinking like you... its too easy right?

Nope...it got just challenging enough to slow them down.


Quoting No_Difference:

Jamie HATED Life of Fred. She struggles with reading though too, so I think that may have been part of it. I personally like MUS, but at the same time, I think I need something that is a little bit more of a challenge so we're not flying through this stuff so quickly. At this rate, they'll be done with the Calc book by 10th grade, and then I'm stuck trying to find far more difficult math for them... not that its bad lol, but I'd rather challenge them a little more now if I can...  

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3: A thought.. .
I know nothing about Singapore but I know a bunch of families who supplement MUS with Life of Fred.

JasonsMom2007
by Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:54 PM
Mine is 6 almost 7. He catches on so fast too! But we use a charter school so I don't have to worry about cost.

Quoting No_Difference:

We do extra practice. When we go shopping, he writes down the prices, and adds them together as we go through the store. Even with decimals, he's still getting it. I haven't done averages with him yet, although I wouldn't be surprised if he could grasp that concept easily. If he wants to play with the skylanders, he has to answer either a spelling or math problem... He helps with cooking all the time so gets practice in there too... I would expect he'd slow down at gamma. I'd be amazed if he didn't. He's turning 5 next week friday. I just think multiplication, even though he already has all the skip counting down, is going to slow him down a lot more than adding and subtracting. It's still the cost of having to go through so many books in a year... On the up side, we have the teachers manual from gamma from when my oldest used it, so it'd just be buying the workbook.... I'm probably over thinking all of this too, but I can't help it :/  

Quoting JasonsMom2007: Can you give him extra practice then? Mine slowed down at gamma. We did a lot of extra math games and such to practice instead of just relying on the books. I felt it had caught up to where he needed to be.
We do extra word problems, projects, and real life things as well. The other day we were shopping so he found the area, perimeter, total number, and how many we each could have of a pack of water bottles we were buying. He found the average amount of water bottles in 3 different packs as well.

Quoting No_Difference:

I would only be "switching" with my little guy, who technically would be K next year anyway. I'm sticking with MUS with Jamie since I don't want any gaps with her. I know he's learning but I don't want to have to purchase two books again. I've printed off worksheets from the Beta book, and he was breezing through those too which is leading me to believe he'll fly through Beta, and then I'll have to start him on Gamma book, where he'll finally slow the heck down for a little bit anyway...though he has started multiplying already too.... I just can't afford to keep going through so many books a year with him :/  I know challenging is on a personal basis. I was trying to use the term loosely.  

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Just my two cents... I try not to rock the boat.  With math especially, switching curriculums can cause us to miss a few building blocks.  Also I just got into an argument with a woman at co-op about the word challenging.  MUS gives a great foundation (as does Singapore), so just because my child is flying through it doesn't mean the learning isn't happening.  Now the cost of flying through a curriculum I totally understand, but please don't switch just to make math more challenging.

:-)

mem82
by Platinum Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 10:51 PM

Kids well fly through until they hit their brick wall. 8) Have you thought about supplementing to slow them down?

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