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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

I've been using Math U See with my daughter so far, and she loves it. She was struggling in math after we had pulled her out of PS but now she is excelling at it, and its taking about 5 min on average for her to get the worksheet for the day done, unless it's a 6 digit divided by 4 digit...those take hours...she gets them right but she does it sooo sloooow lol. 
Anyway, I started using Math U See with my little guy, and this year alone he finished the Primer, and is more than half way through the Alpha book. This is in just 1 yr! He is FLYING through this. I've heard that Singapore Math is a little harder, but I've got some reservations on it -  mainly its common core alignments. I didn't switch when Math U See "switched" but I noticed very little change from what it was before it made the switch and then after it made the switch (really it looked like it was just the enrichment pages...nothing in the scope and sequence seemed to change). I don't know how much of a switch there is with Singapore Math though, and all of the 7-11 grades are no longer being made "not" alligned. (I know these books are higher than what the kids need now, but I'm doing all the research now).
I'm thinking of just sticking with Math U See with my daughter since looking at what she knows now, I feel if I switched, she'd be at the 3rd book of Singapore, which is kind of a blow to her... But if I switch my little guy now, he'd be just fine with the K book. Neither of the kids use the blocks ever when doing their math. Riley just wants to play with them...make planes mostly... he doesn't ever use them to help with counting.

For those of you who use Singapore, do you and the kids like it? Is it a little more challenging? Do I need to worry about it being "common core" or was it basically the same before the "switch"? Is the teacher manual worth getting?
I'm also confused on the whole A & B thing. Is A first semster and B second semester?  Whats the difference between Standard and non standard? I get that the workbook is where they do all the work, do they need the text book too, or is that more for the classroom setting?  

I know its a lot of questions. Thank you in advanced :)  

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by on Mar. 28, 2014 at 10:47 AM
Replies (31-37):
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 7:26 AM

I have a budget for each kid per year. So if I'm spending that entire budget at the beginning of the year, not thinking to purchase ahead (like this year for instance) 2 books for a subject, I'm dipping into a different fund. 
So far the majority of the stuff I've bought for Jamie, I will most likely not use with Riley anyway because we've either not liked it at all, or we've found something better suited to Jamie's learning style. I may end up changing for Riley anyway so it's better suited to him, which is why we have a different budget per kid. I know if I kept Riley with MUS, I'd just have to get the new workbook once we got to Delta and from then on which would save technically and would free up more of a budget for Riley's school stuff... 

Quoting KrissyKC: Oh... and how is using two different maths going to help you save money. I am keeping each of their stuff to pass down to the younger students and only have to buy one set of teachers books, dvds, and manipulatives.


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No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 7:38 AM

One of the, I guess stipulations, hubby has with being okay with homeschooling is we do an actual math class every day. He has come a long with the "idea" of homeschooling since we've started, and he's been loving the results, but he still has his "this is how it has to be if we're going to keep doing this..." He has very little actual requests like this, so I tend to comply to keep him happy and in certain subjects uninvolved so he doesn't confuse them. (He tends to overcomplicate the simpliest things). 

We've also tried things like Kahn Academy (I think thats what it was??) and Ixl, and Jamie HATED it. I haven't tried it with Riley. Math has been only taking 5 to 15 minutes every day usually (unless its chapter 25 it seems...then it takes hours to do one stinking problem....), by having them play a game, I tend to drag out math time.  

Quoting KrissyKC: What about doing less math and freeing up more time for practice reading and other subjects. I know when Liam was done with gamma and we hadn't ordered the next one, we did a couple weeks of math games online for about 20 minutes 3 times/weekly and focused on the other subjects.
Quoting No_Difference:

Jamie has been flew through the Gamma book and only slowed down when she hit chapter 25. This year on Delta she flew through (after her period of utter procrastination) til she hit chapter 25. I think with both its multiple digit times multiple digit with regrouping, and multi digit divided by multi digit. As soon as she passed Chapter 25, she picked up speed again. With both of those chapters, she could get the answers correct but it took her ages to do it. Eventually, I just had her move on... I have her practice speed on those types of problems seperately now.  I'm ordering her the Epsilon book (since I'm sticking with MUS with her) soon, and by the "end" of our school year, she'll most likely be through most of Epsilon since my dad has been doing fractions with her and she already has said "so far too easy." I know they slow down at certain points, but if they're getting the problems correct, we move on, regardless of how fast or slow they are at getting the correct answer, which still keeps them moving relatively quickly. Both seem to be geared for math. I really do like MUS though. I like that it is fully mastery based and I know the kids know their stuff really well and understand it thoroughly, I'm just really afraid of the cost with two kids doing math now, and possibly going through 1 1/2-2 books a year with each of them. Especially if they continue to find math easy. 

Quoting KrissyKC: Just an observation. My kids switched to math u see this year. They were gamma and zeta. They flew through the first third of the book and I was thinking like you... its too easy right? Nope...it got just challenging enough to slow them down.
Quoting No_Difference:

Jamie HATED Life of Fred. She struggles with reading though too, so I think that may have been part of it. I personally like MUS, but at the same time, I think I need something that is a little bit more of a challenge so we're not flying through this stuff so quickly. At this rate, they'll be done with the Calc book by 10th grade, and then I'm stuck trying to find far more difficult math for them... not that its bad lol, but I'd rather challenge them a little more now if I can...  

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3: A thought.. . I know nothing about Singapore but I know a bunch of families who supplement MUS with Life of Fred.


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No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 7:48 AM

Riley is turning 5 on Friday, and he has done really well with MUS so far, and I really do like MUS a lot to be honeset. 
With both kiddos, I do something very similar. MUS will kind of introduce a new topic, but not really tell you thats what you're doing. For instance, with Riley he was introduced to subtraction as 8 + X = 16. All word problems are you have this amount, and you have so many of this, how many more do you need... So I've shown him after he solves the solve the for the unkown problem, he's really doing subtraction. So he's pretty good at the concept of subtraction before we have ever gotten to it. Withe Jamie, she just started to doing Fractions of a Number, which is an intro to the next book... It's asking what is 3/4 of 16 for instance. I showed her how the book wanted her to learn it, but then also how to figure out it out as 3/4 times 16/1 = ... and just for fun since the worksheet she finished so quickly, we printed worksheets off the website from the next book, and she worked on those. for a little bit where she was multiplying fractions, including ones where the demnominator was not 1, and we've worked on simplifying fractions for most of the year as they've come up. With both kids, we've already introduced balancing equations when solving for the unknown, in math, and related it right back over to chemistry, and hubby has been having Jamie balance chemical formulas! (that is something I was never good at...he can have chemistry with the kids lol. I'll do the other sciences...) 

Quoting Beniegenie: I don't have any answers to your questions, sorry I mostly was reading this because I'm very interested in MUS and want to get opinions about it before purchasing it. However I wante to tell you what I do for my son. He's 6 in first grade and we've been using Abeka since kindergarten. He picks up stuff way to fast. Never gets the answers wrong. And daily the teacher book has them either learning something new or reviewing and reviewing stuff he's learned. Same for phonics and language and reading. So what I've done is read through to make sure I introduce things that abeka is saying to introduce that day and then I push him further. For instance they taught coins and counting but for the longest time it was limited to just pennies, nickels and dimes. I taught him quarters early on because he catches on too quickly. Then ince he mastered that I moved him on to larger amounts. So basically I review on things that abeka seems to touch on and not mention again for many lessons. So by the time they mention it again he's mastered it. I always make sure that he knows a new topic backwards as forward. I only use the teacher books to be certain that I'm not forgetting anything like temperature. So we don't skip through or push through. We just do each daily lesson and I challenge him. Not sure if that helps :) I really enjoyed reading all your comments. I think I'm going to purchase MUS and start my 4 year old out with it.


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KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 9:18 AM
Wait. Riley is four and balancing chemical equasions? Am I reading that correctly?

Because if so... then my advice is out the window. My eldest is pretty intelligent and mathematical and all... but that is beyond my level of experience.

Maybe we just need skipped grades. Get the scope and sequence of what they would be learning in that book and go over the concepts yourself briefly just to be sure they get it... and then move on.

Sorry, but math is one of those subjects that is just going to cost you.

Buy some logic books and workbooks that are challenging and fun. Do these things to stretch out their math as well as games/flash cards/ etc.

Quoting No_Difference:

Riley is turning 5 on Friday, and he has done really well with MUS so far, and I really do like MUS a lot to be honeset. With both kiddos, I do something very similar. MUS will kind of introduce a new topic, but not really tell you thats what you're doing. For instance, with Riley he was introduced to subtraction as 8 + X = 16. All word problems are you have this amount, and you have so many of this, how many more do you need... So I've shown him after he solves the solve the for the unkown problem, he's really doing subtraction. So he's pretty good at the concept of subtraction before we have ever gotten to it. Withe Jamie, she just started to doing Fractions of a Number, which is an intro to the next book... It's asking what is 3/4 of 16 for instance. I showed her how the book wanted her to learn it, but then also how to figure out it out as 3/4 times 16/1 = ... and just for fun since the worksheet she finished so quickly, we printed worksheets off the website from the next book, and she worked on those. for a little bit where she was multiplying fractions, including ones where the demnominator was not 1, and we've worked on simplifying fractions for most of the year as they've come up. With both kids, we've already introduced balancing equations when solving for the unknown, in math, and related it right back over to chemistry, and hubby has been having Jamie balance chemical formulas! (that is something I was never good at...he can have chemistry with the kids lol. I'll do the other sciences...) 

Quoting Beniegenie: I don't have any answers to your questions, sorry I mostly was reading this because I'm very interested in MUS and want to get opinions about it before purchasing it. However I wante to tell you what I do for my son. He's 6 in first grade and we've been using Abeka since kindergarten. He picks up stuff way to fast. Never gets the answers wrong. And daily the teacher book has them either learning something new or reviewing and reviewing stuff he's learned. Same for phonics and language and reading. So what I've done is read through to make sure I introduce things that abeka is saying to introduce that day and then I push him further. For instance they taught coins and counting but for the longest time it was limited to just pennies, nickels and dimes. I taught him quarters early on because he catches on too quickly. Then ince he mastered that I moved him on to larger amounts. So basically I review on things that abeka seems to touch on and not mention again for many lessons. So by the time they mention it again he's mastered it. I always make sure that he knows a new topic backwards as forward. I only use the teacher books to be certain that I'm not forgetting anything like temperature. So we don't skip through or push through. We just do each daily lesson and I challenge him. Not sure if that helps :) I really enjoyed reading all your comments. I think I'm going to purchase MUS and start my 4 year old out with it.

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 9:23 AM
Wait... nevermind.. I just reread my error.

Still, your kids are very mathematic and with dh's expectations on doing a math class daily, you are going to just be busy and use several things.

My kids enjoy doing whiteboard math together. I buy logic books and math challenges and present these to them. Could be done daily, add to that a quick speed test, add to that some math games, and you have now done math for 30 minutes.
melindabelcher
by Mel on Mar. 30, 2014 at 10:45 AM
1 mom liked this
I personally wasnt impressed with singapore. It was very baby-ish for my son when he was in K. So I jumped around in it to find new concepts to use as extra work to my curriculum I wrote for him.
We just started saxon and so far both my early kindergartner and second grader love it. But there are alot of manipulatives that not everyone likes.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 2:11 PM

I've been seeing that might be the case *sigh*  There are some days I wish they would take their math aptitude and apply it to reading lol 

Quoting KrissyKC: Wait... nevermind.. I just reread my error. Still, your kids are very mathematic and with dh's expectations on doing a math class daily, you are going to just be busy and use several things. My kids enjoy doing whiteboard math together. I buy logic books and math challenges and present these to them. Could be done daily, add to that a quick speed test, add to that some math games, and you have now done math for 30 minutes.


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