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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

What subjects............

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2014 at 12:43 PM
  • 10 Replies
Are the MOST important ones to cover from 6th to 12th grade??? I homeschool 2 of my girls and I want to make sure I am doing the best job I can! Also is ok to steer away from the traditional education towards more career focused education??
Thanks~ :-)
by on Apr. 8, 2014 at 12:43 PM
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Replies (1-10):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2014 at 1:22 PM
1 mom liked this

I feel that career focused education is short changing a child. By all means, add in their interests... but focusing more on career prep than academics limits them, college-wise, imo.

I would focus on the following for grades 6-12:

Maths (preferable algebra 1 in grade 8, if they hope to go to college, and then subsequent maths every year following, through grade 12)

Literature (analysis skills, comprehension)

Composition

Grammar (through grade 8 or 9).

Spelling in the middle grades, only if necessary

Handwriting in the middle grades, only if necessary

Science in middle school should/would preferably largely *fun* and interesting in the middle grades, and then ramping up content wise and structure-wise in grade 8, to prep them for math based science classes in high school. In grade 8 an algebra based physics, assuming they are doing algebra 1 concurrently, followed by (or preceded by) biology, chemistry,  etc.

History and civics. American history and civics in grade 8, Geography (world) in grade 9, world in grades 10 and 11, European history in grade 12.

Latin

Vocabulary

... that would be bare bones for me. Preferably I would add in a modern foreign language and service hours.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Knightquester
by Bronze Member on Apr. 8, 2014 at 2:33 PM
2 moms liked this

I think it's wise to steer towards a career focus education as well as incorporate the needed educational classes that will help them score well enough on their SAT's and ACT's and get into a good college.  My children do the regular classes Mathematics, English, Science, Science Lab, History, and Foreign Language.  They are also taking theater class because in our state high school students have to have at least a year of performing arts.

My eldest is unsure of what she wants to be when she grows up, so right now she's interning as a teachers assistant on Saturdays at her Japanese school for the beginners class.  She will be interning at the local veterinary office in a few years to try her hand in that field.  Since teaching and veterinarian work are the two she's showed an interest in she's wanting to try both fields out and get a feel of what she likes more.

My second eldest wants to have an AA in mathematics and a BS focus in aerospace engineering.  She's working a lot more difficult math than her older sister, and has taught herself basic computer programming.  She's created a few websites and is interested in pursuing programming as a possible alternative field of work if her dreams of space don't pan out.

We've done field trips to places where they could learn more about a particular filed of work and ask professionals in that line of work how they got there; like our recent one to our weather stations where the Meteorologist went into great detail of what she did, and how much education she had to have to get to where she was at.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 8, 2014 at 5:28 PM
I think I agree with this more than not simply because you can go to college to gain the degree needed for a particular interest and to further your education in that particular field of interest.




Quoting Knightquester:

I think it's wise to steer towards a career focus education as well as incorporate the needed educational classes that will help them score well enough on their SAT's and ACT's and get into a good college.  My children do the regular classes Mathematics, English, Science, Science Lab, History, and Foreign Language.  They are also taking theater class because in our state high school students have to have at least a year of performing arts.

My eldest is unsure of what she wants to be when she grows up, so right now she's interning as a teachers assistant on Saturdays at her Japanese school for the beginners class.  She will be interning at the local veterinary office in a few years to try her hand in that field.  Since teaching and veterinarian work are the two she's showed an interest in she's wanting to try both fields out and get a feel of what she likes more.

My second eldest wants to have an AA in mathematics and a BS focus in aerospace engineering.  She's working a lot more difficult math than her older sister, and has taught herself basic computer programming.  She's created a few websites and is interested in pursuing programming as a possible alternative field of work if her dreams of space don't pan out.

We've done field trips to places where they could learn more about a particular filed of work and ask professionals in that line of work how they got there; like our recent one to our weather stations where the Meteorologist went into great detail of what she did, and how much education she had to have to get to where she was at.

jen2150
by Silver Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 7:45 AM
They are all important. My focus though depends on their intetests and talents. Many of the basics can focused on their interests. Math, English, reading, history, science, computer science, language and music. Music would depend on the child though. I think all kids need basic computer science instruction. I think it is a good idea to focus the basics on their natural talents and interests especially in upper high school. I also plan on encouraging my kids to learn a trade before college.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 9:15 AM
1 mom liked this

I agree. A wide education makes a person more well rounded and also opens up other options to them. Putting too much emphasis in one area is limiting on many levels. What if the child matures a little bit more in their senior year and decides to go for something completely different? They will be starting from scratch.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I feel that career focused education is short changing a child. By all means, add in their interests... but focusing more on career prep than academics limits them, college-wise, imo.

I would focus on the following for grades 6-12:

Maths (preferable algebra 1 in grade 8, if they hope to go to college, and then subsequent maths every year following, through grade 12)

Literature (analysis skills, comprehension)

Composition

Grammar (through grade 8 or 9).

Spelling in the middle grades, only if necessary

Handwriting in the middle grades, only if necessary

Science in middle school should/would preferably largely *fun* and interesting in the middle grades, and then ramping up content wise and structure-wise in grade 8, to prep them for math based science classes in high school. In grade 8 an algebra based physics, assuming they are doing algebra 1 concurrently, followed by (or preceded by) biology, chemistry,  etc.

History and civics. American history and civics in grade 8, Geography (world) in grade 9, world in grades 10 and 11, European history in grade 12.

Latin

Vocabulary

... that would be bare bones for me. Preferably I would add in a modern foreign language and service hours.




MamaLauri
by Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 10:21 AM
1 mom liked this

The education standards groups do a decent jobs of defining what to be taught, not how to teach. 4MyLearn (http://www.4mylearn.org/EducationStandards.html) provides summaries for the Common Core Math, ELA, Next Generation Science Standards and The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (http://www.4mylearn.org/CCSS-Math.html, http://www.4mylearn.org/CCSS-ELA.html, http://www.4mylearn.org/NEXT_GENERATION_SCIENCE_STANDARDS.html, http://www.4mylearn.org/C3_FRAMEWORK_FOR_SOCIAL_STUDIES.html), as well as links to all the major national standards.

Besides those, I include (SLCS) Social, Leadership, Character, and Safety teaching.

TidewaterClan
by on Apr. 9, 2014 at 10:25 AM

This is how I feel too.  Aimee and Mem both have great points.  PLUS the first two years of college are spent on general education for the most part.  It's a great time as a student to REALLY consider the options/interests before you and change your mind before you've put any money into a specific degree. :)


Quoting mem82:

I agree. A wide education makes a person more well rounded and also opens up other options to them. Putting too much emphasis in one area is limiting on many levels. What if the child matures a little bit more in their senior year and decides to go for something completely different? They will be starting from scratch.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

I feel that career focused education is short changing a child. By all means, add in their interests... but focusing more on career prep than academics limits them, college-wise, imo.

I would focus on the following for grades 6-12:

Maths (preferable algebra 1 in grade 8, if they hope to go to college, and then subsequent maths every year following, through grade 12)

Literature (analysis skills, comprehension)

Composition

Grammar (through grade 8 or 9).

Spelling in the middle grades, only if necessary

Handwriting in the middle grades, only if necessary

Science in middle school should/would preferably largely *fun* and interesting in the middle grades, and then ramping up content wise and structure-wise in grade 8, to prep them for math based science classes in high school. In grade 8 an algebra based physics, assuming they are doing algebra 1 concurrently, followed by (or preceded by) biology, chemistry,  etc.

History and civics. American history and civics in grade 8, Geography (world) in grade 9, world in grades 10 and 11, European history in grade 12.

Latin

Vocabulary

... that would be bare bones for me. Preferably I would add in a modern foreign language and service hours.




katyq
by Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 5:14 PM

It depends on what the end game is. Do you want your children to be accepted into an Ivy League school? If so, music and Latin (or Greek) along with a modern language such as French, German, Italian, Japanese or Chinese would be great daily or bi-daily additions to their studies. Art and art history are both excellent subjects to study though if you don't have prior knowledge, you may want to rely on curriculums which can be pricey. Atelier is an excellent art curriculum that gets rave reviews.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 9, 2014 at 5:39 PM

Definitely reading, writing, math and science

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 10:50 PM

I'm with you here.

Quoting KickButtMama:

Definitely reading, writing, math and science




I will not have a temper tantrum nor stomp across the floor.


I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














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