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Curriculm for struggling students

Posted by on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:09 AM
  • 17 Replies

 DS has been in public school since kindergarten. We were originally going to let him finish the school year before we start homeschooling him next year but I'm now withdrawing him on Friday. Our current plan is to spend the rest of this school year just try to catch him up a little before we start "3rd " grade. I think most the time will be spent on reading and simple addition/subtraction. Between driving 800+ miles back home in 2 weeks, having a baby next month,DH returning from his thankfully short deployment in June and then moving the second week of June we will be extremely busy.

  For math we plan to use MUS Beta, and I'm leaning towards write shop primary to help with his writing skills. He has ASD and his written communication skills are about 2 years behind his peers. His reading skills, comprehension and spelling are also behind by at least a year.  Any recommendations for language arts curriculum?

by on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:09 AM
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mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:14 AM
1 mom liked this

Hm, I don't know if you want to actually buy a curriculum, yet. Even in his situation I suggest a period of deschooling.  It seems like it might be easier to take some time to reinforce his phonics and sight words first. Lots of reading and answering short questions or writing short summaries might be the way to go right now. 

MUS is good and can be helpful.


BrittO2
by Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:35 AM

 That was the plan for the reminder of this school year and the summer. I'm hoping to have him at least reading on a 2nd grade level by next school year without struggling. I'm just not sure what to do in the fall for him, I'm guessing we will basically be redoing 2nd grade.

Quoting mem82:

Hm, I don't know if you want to actually buy a curriculum, yet. Even in his situation I suggest a period of deschooling.  It seems like it might be easier to take some time to reinforce his phonics and sight words first. Lots of reading and answering short questions or writing short summaries might be the way to go right now. 

MUS is good and can be helpful.

 

mem82
by Platinum Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:44 AM

You're in a tough spot because if he starts picking up speed with reading, especially, a 2nd grade repeat might not be necessary. I have found that being able to read will really accelerate writing and everything else but Math seems to come along better.

I would check out All About Spelling and All about Reading. If you join your local FB groups and curriculum sales, you'll get a great deal on things. Everyone is off loading or preparing to sale their curriculum from this past year. 8)

Quoting BrittO2:

 That was the plan for the reminder of this school year and the summer. I'm hoping to have him at least reading on a 2nd grade level by next school year without struggling. I'm just not sure what to do in the fall for him, I'm guessing we will basically be redoing 2nd grade.

Quoting mem82:

Hm, I don't know if you want to actually buy a curriculum, yet. Even in his situation I suggest a period of deschooling.  It seems like it might be easier to take some time to reinforce his phonics and sight words first. Lots of reading and answering short questions or writing short summaries might be the way to go right now. 

MUS is good and can be helpful.

 


chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 12:48 PM
There are various curriculums for the subjects. I'd recommend buying different curriculums per subject than buying a packaged deal.
We use Math U See and it is good for struggling students as well as those who get math easily. It has accessments on their website to use so you can put your kid in the right book. All About Spelling and All About Reading are good for kids who struggle with those subjects. I've also heard good things about Sequential Spelling. I use Explode the Code for phonics and reading with my son. My oldest struggled in reading but now he doesn't, so I generally recommend it. For writing there is a program called Excellence in Writing and that is said to be good. It all depends on what you're looking for.
BrittO2
by Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 1:18 PM

 We have a kindergarten who is already homeschooled so we have all about spelling and reading 1 for her, didn't even think to letting him try level 1 AAS and see how he does with it.  Did your oldest enjoy explode the code? (we have the get ready for the code but DD didn't like them so I didn't buy the higher ones.)

Quoting chotovec82: There are various curriculums for the subjects. I'd recommend buying different curriculums per subject than buying a packaged deal. We use Math U See and it is good for struggling students as well as those who get math easily. It has accessments on their website to use so you can put your kid in the right book. All About Spelling and All About Reading are good for kids who struggle with those subjects. I've also heard good things about Sequential Spelling. I use Explode the Code for phonics and reading with my son. My oldest struggled in reading but now he doesn't, so I generally recommend it. For writing there is a program called Excellence in Writing and that is said to be good. It all depends on what you're looking for.

 

chotovec82
by Bronze Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 1:24 PM
Quoting BrittO2:

 We have a kindergarten who is already homeschooled so we have all about spelling and reading 1 for her, didn't even think to letting him try level 1 AAS and see how he does with it.  Did your oldest enjoy explode the code? (we have the get ready for the code but DD didn't like them so I didn't buy the higher ones.)


Quoting chotovec82: There are various curriculums for the subjects. I'd recommend buying different curriculums per subject than buying a packaged deal. We use Math U See and it is good for struggling students as well as those who get math easily. It has accessments on their website to use so you can put your kid in the right book. All About Spelling and All About Reading are good for kids who struggle with those subjects. I've also heard good things about Sequential Spelling. I use Explode the Code for phonics and reading with my son. My oldest struggled in reading but now he doesn't, so I generally recommend it. For writing there is a program called Excellence in Writing and that is said to be good. It all depends on what you're looking for.

 



I have a kinder and a 2nd grader. Both of them enjoyed Explode The Code. My kinder loves almost anything tho and he's never been in public school. My eldest was in public for kinder and he tends to drag his feet more and whine about some school stuff. He does whine about explode the code from time to time; mainly because he just doesn't want to do school. All in all I would say it's been a positive experience for them.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 1:46 PM

We've enjoyed Write Shop so far. I really wish they released the next level up for WriteShop Jr :(.  
We use All About Reading with my little guy and All About Spelling with both kids. Both are mastery based and multi sensory. None of these programs are a complete LA curriculum, but together they cover almost everything. Write Shop from my experience with it goes over the parts of grammar, but its brief and you're supposed to apply the knowledge of it into the writing... There won't be any diagraming sentences with it, but honestly, I never did any of that in school, and I know the parts of speech just from writing...  Those 3 programs together make up our LA curriculum and it's worked well so far.  We use MUS for math too and love it :) 

MamaLauri
by Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 3:23 PM

I am working with a group developing engaging research/neuroscience based curriculm for visual thinkers like kids labeled with with dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD/ADD and ASD. Our focus today is 3 years old through 5th grade. Feel free to contact me or look at my profile for a link to the organization if you want more information.

 

paganbaby
by Silver Member on Apr. 9, 2014 at 11:32 PM

De schooling is definitely a must!

Quoting mem82:

Hm, I don't know if you want to actually buy a curriculum, yet. Even in his situation I suggest a period of deschooling.  It seems like it might be easier to take some time to reinforce his phonics and sight words first. Lots of reading and answering short questions or writing short summaries might be the way to go right now. 

MUS is good and can be helpful.




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I will not pout, scream or shout or kick against the door.

I will not throw my food around nor pick upon another.

I’ll always try to be real good because I am the mother.

I am the mother.

I am the mother.














Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Apr. 10, 2014 at 8:25 AM

I have a 4th grader - age 10 now. He was way behind in math and about a year behind in reading.

I love MUS for a struggling math student. I insist on some sort of handwriting daily, so print or cursive. I prefer cursive and totally believe in the link between fine motor skill development and other language, reading, reasoning skill development, as well as attention development. I just have him copy his word lists in cursive - not using a purchased cursive program.

I used something all year called One Minute Reader. It's not cheap (about $100 for one level), but my son loved it. It has a cd of every reading passage and the idea is to read it independently out loud, read along/listen to the cd, then read independently again. You can chart your progress, but he didn't care about that. He did one or two or even three in a day. We got through the highest level, which I think is green and is about 4th/5th grade level, I think. I bought the cds and books, but it's also available as an on-line app, which may be cheaper? Not sure. I saw amazing improvement in his reading! But next year my plan is to use real children's literature books and do unit studies around the books and use the types of book study guides and "book club questions" you can find on-line.

We also read constatntly in the content areas for social studies and science, and read other things, and he did independent reading with books at the Wimpy Kids level.

I also use SpellWell - it's ok - can't say I think it's the greatest. And I use WordlyWise which I still like pretty much, one nice thing is the word lists for each book and lesson are free on-line thru their website and you can click on teh audio files and hear someone read the word list, definitions and examples in a sentence. I dare say we haven't even cracked out grammar book all year! I'll save it for next year. Then mostly all I've done for writing is a workbook called Daily 6-Traits of Writing. It's very simplistic, but it seems to be about all he can manage at this point. I'd probably have done better if I'd gotten something like Write Shop. I'm up in the air with what to do for writing next year.

good luck!!

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