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Stay At Home Moms REVERSE Decades Long Decline

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Found this today and it has me wondering ...

Do you see this happening in YOUR area where you live?



April 8, 2014 11:58 AM
More Moms Staying Home, Reversing Decadeslong Decline
By LAURA MECKLER

After decades of decline, the share of mothers who stay home with their children has steadily risen over the last several years, a new report has found.
In 2012, 29% of all mothers with children under age 18 stayed at home, a figure that has steadily risen since 1999 when 23% of mothers were stay-at-home, the Pew Research Center reported Tuesday. The share of stay-at-home moms had been dropping since 1967, when about half of all moms stayed home.
Pew attributed the rise of stay-at-home mothers to a mix of demographic, economic and societal factors. The vast majority of married stay-at-home mothers, 85%, say they are doing so by choice in order to care for their families. That rate is much lower for single stay-at-home mothers, at 41%, and cohabitating mothers, at 64%.

The report also found a drop in women working because of the recession, a trend that has lingered as the economy recovers. Pew cited an increase in immigrant families, for whom it is more common to have a mother stay at home with her children, and an increase in the number of women who said they were disabled and unable to work.
A companion public opinion survey by Pew, from 2013, found that mothers are much more likely than fathers to have reduced work hours, take a significant amount of time off, quit a job or, by a small margin, turn down a promotion in order to care for a child or family member. Pew said 42% of mothers said they had reduced their work hours to care for a child or family member, versus 28% of fathers.
A second Pew survey, taken this year, found most in the general public think that children are better off with a parent at home: 60% said children are better off with a parent at home, versus 35% who said kids are just as well off when parents work.
The survey of 3,341 people was conducted in January and February. Groups most likely to say kids are better off with a parent at home include Hispanics, people with a high school degree or less and evangelical Christians, the report said.
The Pew analysis of trends for stay-at-home moms is based on an analysis of data from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey. It defines stay-at-home mothers as those who say they are staying home in order to care for their children, as well as those who are not able to find work, are disabled or are enrolled in school.
“This has important implications for the day to day lives of children,” said D’Vera Cohn, the report’s author.
The share of stay-at-home mothers is now higher than it was during the recession in 2008, when it reached 26%. About 6% of moms say they are home because they can’t find a job, up from just 1% in 2000.
The report didn’t find lots more college-educated mothers dropping out of the workforce to spend time with their kids. In 2000, 20% of college-educated mothers were at home, compared to 2012 when it was 21%. Ms. Cohn said college-educated workers have done much better in the economy, helping to explain why they might stay in the workforce.
The report also looked at how stay-at-home versus working moms use their time. Those at home spend more time on housework (23 hours per week versus 14 for working mothers), child care (18 hours vs. 11), leisure (31 hours vs. 22) and sleep (63 hours vs. 58 for working mothers).


Is this real or do you see it more as a trend that fades as quickly as it appeared?

  

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by on Apr. 15, 2014 at 10:28 AM
Replies (11-19):
kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 15, 2014 at 8:35 PM
Sometimes I think it comes down to 2 choices and we pick the lesser of the two evils, so to speak. ? I don't know. What do you think?



Quoting KrissyKC: Being a working mom is terrific and I def admire moms that work for their families.

That being said, having a working mom is not what is always in the best interest of the family unit. I believe that part of changes we are seeing is also due to families realizing this.
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on Apr. 15, 2014 at 11:22 PM
1 mom liked this
I think that for some, they do well working out of the home. But I also think that society made big mistakes pushing so hard for double income households. Some of us really just live life better when a parent is at home most of the time.

This doesn't mean that the sahp can't pick up a job when times are hard or some other income.

Biblically, (if no one minds my sharing) the proverbs 31 woman had her own funding and bought a field to plant a vineyard.

Just Because a mom (or dad) doesn't work in a corporate sense, doesn't mean they cannot find their own vineyard to bless their family with. She (or he) can share the burden of providing for the family.

Quoting kirbymom: Sometimes I think it comes down to 2 choices and we pick the lesser of the two evils, so to speak. ? I don't know. What do you think?



Quoting KrissyKC: Being a working mom is terrific and I def admire moms that work for their families.

That being said, having a working mom is not what is always in the best interest of the family unit. I believe that part of changes we are seeing is also due to families realizing this.
TJandKarasMom
by Debbie on Apr. 16, 2014 at 8:26 AM

I totally agree with this.

I work pt outside the home-though it feels like ft, lol.  I usually work about 20 hours a week, add in travel time and I am gone more than 30.  I know I am not giving my all to any part of my life because I am pulled in different directions.  I would love to be a SAHM but I make a decent amount pt and we need it right now.  This is the best fit, it's a great job and will be a great career if I choose to go that way eventually.

I was raised in a home where both parents worked, we were never in daycare, but we also barely had any family time and I really helped raise my younger brother since it was just the two of us the majority of the time.  My mom was the 'bread winner' but my dad still worked.  My mom also went to school most of my childhood so I really just didn't see her much and when I did, it wasn't a ton of quality time.  I followed her footsteps thinking an education and career were the most important part of a woman's life. It took me until I was probably 28 before I realized that my family should be mre important.  I stopped working on my MEd, and decided to hs.  I wish I had realized all of this years (and $80,000 worth of student loans) ago.

Quoting KrissyKC: Being a working mom is terrific and I def admire moms that work for their families. That being said, having a working mom is not what is always in the best interest of the family unit. I believe that part of changes we are seeing is also due to families realizing this.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 17, 2014 at 9:47 AM
Do you think that if the Industrialized Industry would come back that more men would go back to work?



Quoting KickButtMama:

I think it just has to do with the type of jobs people worked. Before the recession we had tons of insurance and manufacturing jobs in this state, but now it's not so much. So I think a lot of dads were laid off and maybe never went back to work? 

Quoting kirbymom:
Quoting KickButtMama:

I'd say yest, more and more a parent chooses to stay home to mitigate the costs of child care.


... But in my area is it getting to be more popular for it to be the DAD that stays home. 




I find this interesting! Have you ever wondered why the flip?

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 17, 2014 at 10:52 AM
1 mom liked this

Idk, I like to think that we've changed how we view the 'homemaker' that it is no longer gender specific.....but I think if the industrialized industry came back tomorrow, then most men would probably go back to work and the women would stay home. I think it's just too new a change. I think that if the industrial type jobs came back when our kids are adults, then it might be less gender specific....KWIM?

Quoting kirbymom: Do you think that if the Industrialized Industry would come back that more men would go back to work?
Quoting KickButtMama:

I think it just has to do with the type of jobs people worked. Before the recession we had tons of insurance and manufacturing jobs in this state, but now it's not so much. So I think a lot of dads were laid off and maybe never went back to work? 

Quoting kirbymom:
Quoting KickButtMama:

I'd say yest, more and more a parent chooses to stay home to mitigate the costs of child care. ... But in my area is it getting to be more popular for it to be the DAD that stays home. 

I find this interesting! Have you ever wondered why the flip?


kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 18, 2014 at 5:27 PM
Yep. I do.



Quoting KickButtMama:

Idk, I like to think that we've changed how we view the 'homemaker' that it is no longer gender specific.....but I think if the industrialized industry came back tomorrow, then most men would probably go back to work and the women would stay home. I think it's just too new a change. I think that if the industrial type jobs came back when our kids are adults, then it might be less gender specific....KWIM?

Quoting kirbymom: Do you think that if the Industrialized Industry would come back that more men would go back to work?



Quoting KickButtMama:

I think it just has to do with the type of jobs people worked. Before the recession we had tons of insurance and manufacturing jobs in this state, but now it's not so much. So I think a lot of dads were laid off and maybe never went back to work? 

Quoting kirbymom:
Quoting KickButtMama:

I'd say yest, more and more a parent chooses to stay home to mitigate the costs of child care.


... But in my area is it getting to be more popular for it to be the DAD that stays home. 




I find this interesting! Have you ever wondered why the flip?

TidewaterClan
by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 8:48 PM
1 mom liked this

Great topic.  I read an article last year that basically said women were more and more stressed working and juggling family.  On average (not for everyone of course) women are still expected to keep up with the house, cooking, family chores even though they're also holding down a full-time job.  

One of my all-time favorite movies is "Baby Boom."   I love when she is walking back towards the boardroom, has a contract from her old bosses with everything she ever wanted, and slows down as she realizes what she'd be giving up.  That's how it was for me one day at work.  I loved what I did, but I love this so much more.

KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 18, 2014 at 9:16 PM
1 mom liked this

I think read the same article. And I agree completely. I know when I was working part time I felt so much pressure to be 'Super Mom' - the one who works, looks awesome because she works out a lot and has her make-up on and hair done, the house looks showroom perfect, the kids are like Stepford wives obedient - always behaving in public and always perfectly clean. I felt like a failure since I usually only remembered to shower on the days I worked, and the dishes never got done until we completely ran out of silverware. And I never remembered make-up. But, I've never EVER heard of a woman who is all those things....or a man for that matter. I don't think you can. 

I was going to be going back to work as an engineer after I had my eldest. I made a ton of money in that job, and I truly loved it. But once my son was born, and I was Brest feeding, and the date of my returning to work drew ever closer....I couldn't do it. I literally quit the day before I was supposed to go back. It was a tough decision. We had to sell our house and give up our nice cars....but I don't regret it. Realistically I wouldn't have been able to continue for more than a year or so anyway as my vascular disease got a whole lot worse after having kids. 

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Great topic.  I read an article last year that basically said women were more and more stressed working and juggling family.  On average (not for everyone of course) women are still expected to keep up with the house, cooking, family chores even though they're also holding down a full-time job.  

One of my all-time favorite movies is "Baby Boom."   I love when she is walking back towards the boardroom, has a contract from her old bosses with everything she ever wanted, and slows down as she realizes what she'd be giving up.  That's how it was for me one day at work.  I loved what I did, but I love this so much more.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 19, 2014 at 7:53 PM
I think I read the same article. :) I definitely watched the movie. That was a good scene that you're talking about. I remember thinking that if only my mom had been able to do the same. kwim?


Quoting TidewaterClan:

Great topic.  I read an article last year that basically said women were more and more stressed working and juggling family.  On average (not for everyone of course) women are still expected to keep up with the house, cooking, family chores even though they're also holding down a full-time job.  

One of my all-time favorite movies is "Baby Boom."   I love when she is walking back towards the boardroom, has a contract from her old bosses with everything she ever wanted, and slows down as she realizes what she'd be giving up.  That's how it was for me one day at work.  I loved what I did, but I love this so much more.

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