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Confused about Social Studies

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I'm trying to decide what to do with my son next year for 2nd grade. In public school here Social Studies builds from my family, my community, my state, American geography and history, and then world history, but homeschooling Social Studies seem to start with ancient history. Can anyone explain the rationale behind starting with ancient history so young?
by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 11:17 AM
Replies (11-20):
PinkButterfly66
by on Apr. 18, 2014 at 8:57 PM

The 3rd grade curriculum for history in my state's public school covered ancient rome, greece, and mali.  I homeschooled my kid for 3rd grade and followed the public school's curriculum and we made a chiton for the ancient civilizations section. 

jen2150
by Silver Member on Apr. 18, 2014 at 11:58 PM
We like to alternate. This year we are doing Lewis and clark and starting in July we are doing ancient and middle ages history, inventors, and mathematicians. It really depnds on their interest. I think starting on ancient history makes more sense. A lot of US government is based on ancient history and governments. They studied success and failures in governments before deciding what government system would work best. We tend to do US history one year and world the next. I have to admit ancient history is a lot of fun and has always interested me.
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Apr. 19, 2014 at 10:14 AM
1 mom liked this
I wondered this same thing when I first started homeschooling. It didn't make sense to me at first, but having done ancient history first,my kids have a better sense of the timeline of history,and are more culturally aware. For instance,when reading The Hunger Games, my DD was able to see the parallel to ancient Rome. It gives them a broader perspective.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Apr. 19, 2014 at 3:04 PM

I agree with all of those!  They do tend to learn the community stuff by osmosis, you can do it all or do it alternatingly.  And some kids can really grasp their place in history well!

Quoting JKronrod:

 I absolutely agree with this.

I'll also point out that it doesn't have to be one or the other exclusively, and it's a lot easier to learn about "my community,"  "my family," etc. through experiential education (i.e., you visit the fire station; you talk about police, doctors, nurses, etc. in the community; you attend services at your religious institution), so if you are even remotely diligent in looking for experiences and then talking about them, they'll learn the "community" stuff through osmosis.  Ancient history, on the other hand, does require some effort. 

I have to say that my 7-year-old LOVES history.  Once he could read independently he begged to "read one more chapter" of his history books.  The idea of being part of something  much bigger than yourself both physically AND temporally is huge, and I think an important concept to learn young, and I agree with the notion that having that perspective about other cultures is also something that is a missed opportunity if you don't do it young.    

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Rationale for starting ancient:  Kids that learn world history first get an appreciation for themselves as citizens of the world.  They are more likely to think of their own culture in terms of how it fits into their world view.  While kids who learn about their own family and community first are more likely to think of their own culture as the "right way" to do things.  

Rationale for teaching local family and community first:  The child begins with what they are already familiar with, the stuff they know.  They learn to interact within their community right from the beginning and then are more likely to continue interacting with that community.

Both have their good and bad points, but I chose to do the ancient history and cultures forst because I believe in this era it is more likely for people to move around and more likely for people to interact across cultural boundaries and I wanted my kids better prepared for that.



Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Apr. 19, 2014 at 4:58 PM
Thanks for all the info. I still don't know what to choose but this gives me a better understanding of the two approaches.
maggiemom2000
by Member on Apr. 19, 2014 at 6:27 PM

You can do socical studies however you like. I like a literature based approach, especially for that age. Here's one example:

http://www.movingbeyondthepage.com/purchase/skudetail.aspx?skuID=1210

Kerseygeek
by Member on Apr. 19, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Are there any curriculums that do ancient history for grade 2 besides History of the World?

kirbymom
by Sonja on Apr. 20, 2014 at 11:28 AM
1 mom liked this
I love the 2 sides of thought you put out. I actually do both. I started with world history then followed up with american history to show the different thought processes and why as well as the effects of their thinking.



Quoting bluerooffarm:

Rationale for starting ancient:  Kids that learn world history first get an appreciation for themselves as citizens of the world.  They are more likely to think of their own culture in terms of how it fits into their world view.  While kids who learn about their own family and community first are more likely to think of their own culture as the "right way" to do things.  

Rationale for teaching local family and community first:  The child begins with what they are already familiar with, the stuff they know.  They learn to interact within their community right from the beginning and then are more likely to continue interacting with that community.

Both have their good and bad points, but I chose to do the ancient history and cultures forst because I believe in this era it is more likely for people to move around and more likely for people to interact across cultural boundaries and I wanted my kids better prepared for that.

coala
by Silver Member on Apr. 20, 2014 at 12:24 PM

We did family, community, states, America and then the world.....that was for K, 1st, and 2nd.  I don't know what 3rd grade will hold just yet.

Nashuasmom
by New Member on Apr. 20, 2014 at 2:29 PM

So Social Studies, History and Geography are considered one and the same? I've been trying to figure this out for some time.

This post has been informative on what to teach, but I'm trying to figure out how to write my educational objectives and what goes under what category.

I was thinking I would do history and tie geography in with that, but then Soc. would be more like civics and studies of present day cultures.

Is this a state or district thing or a schooling thing in general?

Thanks!


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