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Some classical schools here start in first grade. What do you all in this group do? Curriculum suggestion for a reluctant learner?
by on Apr. 24, 2014 at 12:36 AM
Replies (31-40):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2014 at 9:46 AM

That isn't necessarily true. There's an entire case for teaching cursive first, actually.

Quoting MamaLauri:

Your child should be comfortable with printing first. Is your child uninterested or having problems. Try start with making letters in sand, scented dough, gingerbread is great cuz you can eat the cookies, paint; before pencil.


I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Jenn8604
by Member on May. 30, 2014 at 9:48 AM
I started in 2nd or 3rd grade and will probably teach my son about the same time if he can get a handle on printing.
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MamaLauri
by Member on May. 30, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Can you please provide a reference or two?

Reading is rarely cursive. Reading, writing, spelling and keyboarding should flow together. Printing reinforces letter recognition, and can be used to reinforce phonics.

Cursive is faster, more artistic and kinetic. Cursive is important to dyslexic and other children who are less fluent in reading once they reach 2nd grade and above, because 85% of education is written today, not keyboard.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That isn't necessarily true. There's an entire case for teaching cursive first, actually.

Quoting MamaLauri:

Your child should be comfortable with printing first. Is your child uninterested or having problems. Try start with making letters in sand, scented dough, gingerbread is great cuz you can eat the cookies, paint; before pencil.



AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2014 at 10:38 AM

Sure. My favorite resource is on the Logic of English articles on it. I can't link right now, but I will later (otherwise, just google "logic of english handwriting").

Research shows that children who learn to write in cursive first, have no problem learning bookface or manuscript/how to read regular print.


Quoting MamaLauri:

Can you please provide a reference or two?

Reading is rarely cursive. Reading, writing, spelling and keyboarding should flow together. Printing reinforces letter recognition, and can be used to reinforce phonics.

Cursive is faster, more artistic and kinetic. Cursive is important to dyslexic and other children who are less fluent in reading once they reach 2nd grade and above, because 85% of education is written today, not keyboard.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

That isn't necessarily true. There's an entire case for teaching cursive first, actually.

Quoting MamaLauri:

Your child should be comfortable with printing first. Is your child uninterested or having problems. Try start with making letters in sand, scented dough, gingerbread is great cuz you can eat the cookies, paint; before pencil.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















ChristineTate
by Member on May. 30, 2014 at 11:02 AM

When their printing looks nice.  My daughter could have started learning cursive in first grade, but her printing was messy.  I wanted her to focus on developing that skill well before I let her move on to cursive.  It took until the end of second grade before I was satisfied with her quality of printing, so we started cursive at the beginning of third grade.  I think it's important to teach children to not just complete a task, but complete it well before moving on to something else.

MamaLauri
by Member on May. 30, 2014 at 11:21 AM

Thanks. I read their paper. It was interesting.

They make strong claims but there was not any reference of research to back up the claims. Therefore, I would be hesitant. And I am not certain if their claims of the prevalence of less than beautiful and improper handwriting, e.g. using print capitals with cursive, is significant in today's digital world let alone our children's. The only time I use cursive is for notes to myself and my signature. But children would use it for their school work. 

If you print or use cursive, it is for communication. It needs to be easily legible. Women are no longer valued for their beautiful penmanship. I appreciate beautiful handwriting as an art, but I do not think poorly of someone who does not as long as their writing is legible.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Sure. My favorite resource is on the Logic of English articles on it. I can't link right now, but I will later (otherwise, just google "logic of english handwriting").

Research shows that children who learn to write in cursive first, have no problem learning bookface or manuscript/how to read regular print.



AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2014 at 11:38 AM

I think we're coming at this from very different places. My children have attended private Catholic schools, and a private school for gifted/dyslexic children, in addition to being homeschooled at various points. At all of the private schools they've attended, cursive was required for all school after grade 2. I use cursive a LOT.

Just because society doesn't value something (i.e. the great books/classics, etc), doesn't mean the thing has no value. My cursive is just as legible as my print. I know times are changing but our home (and it seems, our world/area) is pretty traditional, so I'm obviously coming at it from a different angle :D

Quoting MamaLauri:

Thanks. I read their paper. It was interesting.

They make strong claims but there was not any reference of research to back up the claims. Therefore, I would be hesitant. And I am not certain if their claims of the prevalence of less than beautiful and improper handwriting, e.g. using print capitals with cursive, is significant in today's digital world let alone our children's. The only time I use cursive is for notes to myself and my signature. But children would use it for their school work. 

If you print or use cursive, it is for communication. It needs to be easily legible. Women are no longer valued for their beautiful penmanship. I appreciate beautiful handwriting as an art, but I do not think poorly of someone who does not as long as their writing is legible.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Sure. My favorite resource is on the Logic of English articles on it. I can't link right now, but I will later (otherwise, just google "logic of english handwriting").

Research shows that children who learn to write in cursive first, have no problem learning bookface or manuscript/how to read regular print.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















julesjerry
by Bronze Member on Jun. 3, 2014 at 7:52 AM

We just started, my daughter was asking for it everyday. She is 6.5years old.

myfirstloves
by Member on Jun. 4, 2014 at 3:14 PM

Well I decided to start my 8 yr old dd today. She is working in the Reason For Handwriting workbook for Manuscript and had a few more weeks before she would start intro to cursive. I felt she was ready so we started out with vowel a. Let me tell you, not a good idea on my part. She is fighting me the whole way. She is not ready apparently! So start when your child seems ready. It could be because in her mind it's "Summer Break" and she would rather be playing in the yard.

 




AmyG1976
by Member on Jun. 4, 2014 at 4:25 PM
1 mom liked this

 when the child is ready no rush. Now my kids oldest idk she was in public think they started in 3rd but by the time she was in 5th or 6th the schools around us dropped cursive from the curriculm. I taught my going to be an 8th grader and my going to be a 6th grader together 2 or 3 years ago. My going to be a 4th grader is going to learn it next year so far anyway.

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