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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Thinking about starting homeschooling, need help

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2014 at 9:59 AM
  • 10 Replies

Hello there,


  My name is Amanda and I have 3 kid my two oldest are in highschool and go to a very prominent classical education charter school and are doing wonderfully.  My youngest is 7 and has recently been diagnosed with dyslexia, has hearing problems and she also tested gifted.  We have had nothing but trouble from public school.  I would send her to the charter but shes been on their waitlist since she was 4 and is unlikely to get in before 6th grade.   I am now considering homeschooling.   I dont even know where to start.  We are on a budget and it seems like all the curriculum is very expensive and I wouldnt even know how to create a curriculum.  I thought about k12 or connections academy but i dont like the reviews I'm seeing.  Does anyone here have any suggestions? 

by on Apr. 25, 2014 at 9:59 AM
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KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 25, 2014 at 10:13 AM

Not every homeschooler uses a boxed curriculum, which can be expensive. I usually budget in one online program - ixl.com, time4learning.com, etc. Then the rest of our curriculum I use fre resources.

but the first place to start with is your states requirements. Build your curriculum from there. 

Lordgodempress
by New Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 10:31 AM

What kind of free resources do you use?

Quoting KickButtMama:

Not every homeschooler uses a boxed curriculum, which can be expensive. I usually budget in one online program - ixl.com, time4learning.com, etc. Then the rest of our curriculum I use fre resources.

but the first place to start with is your states requirements. Build your curriculum from there. 


KickButtMama
by Shannon on Apr. 25, 2014 at 10:35 AM
1 mom liked this

I recently wrote a post on my blog with an outline of what we do. Feel free to check out my blog 

Quoting Lordgodempress:

What kind of free resources do you use?

Quoting KickButtMama:

Not every homeschooler uses a boxed curriculum, which can be expensive. I usually budget in one online program - ixl.com, time4learning.com, etc. Then the rest of our curriculum I use fre resources.

but the first place to start with is your states requirements. Build your curriculum from there. 



Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 10:37 AM

I, too, have read the poor revies of k12 and Connections Academy. My guess is they would be dismal for a student with a learning disability like dyslexia. I would not expect a boxed curriculum to meet the needs of a dyslexic student either. I'd personally start with putting research effort into finding a reading program for dyslexia you can teach at home and see if that's doable and affordable, and go from there. 

I suspect my son has a touch of discalculia, and MathUSee works extremely well for him and it's super easy for me in terms of planning and teaching. I'd totally recommend it to anyone at the early grades, whether they are a math wiz or not, because it's not language-based like so many of the reform math programs are. It's all practice on the standard algorithms -- so a non-reader or a late-reader can excel and breeze through it. 

good luck!! 

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM

With a twice exceptional student, I would advise you stay far away from K12 and Connections - despite their claims, they do not have a good rep (at all) of moving at the child's pace, and isn't considered flexible by most.

Ideally a dyslexic child would receive OG tutoring, but that does run about $50 per session, with a general mandatory session twice a week (so upwards of $400/monthly). If that is out of your price range, I absolutely do have more cost effective suggestions (my eldest is dyslexic; currently attending a private school for dyslexic children, but was home for a few years prior to that).

Apples and Pears Spelling ($45 per level)

Dancing Bears Reading (sister program to Apples and Pears Spelling - about $50 per level, I think)


For your other subjects, keep it simple this year:

Writing - PAL Writing, by Institute for Excellence in Writing ($89)

Mathematics - does she need constant review? If so, she needs a spiral program; CLE is a fantastic, cheap option ($45 per level, including teacher's manual). Does she prefer to thoroughly cover/master a skill area, with little review of that skill after? If so, you want a mastery program like Math Mammoth ($33 per level)

History - Story of the World. You need the text and activity book ($35 for both, if you buy from Amazon)

Science - I would take a literature based approach at this age. Buy some of the "Let's Read and Find Out Science" series, and some Magic School Bus books (cap it at, say, $50)... or you could use Behold and See science from Catholic Heritage Curriculum (I think the first and second grade levels are each about $25?)

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Lordgodempress
by New Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 12:31 PM

Yes, sadly OG tutoring would be out of our price range.   We unfortunately do not have a dyslexic private school here so thats not even an option but our public school has basically told us there is nothing they can do for her, Besides being dyslexic and gifted. She also has hearing issues due to a genetic condition which will possibly cause complete deafness in a few years.  This genetic disorder also cause serious thyroid issues.  Despite everyhing going on with her, the school keeps telling me she has ADHD even though the dr said she has too many health issues going on for us to even consider that at this time, especially being no worse than she is.   To be honest, I am terrified of homeschooling but I feel like we are at a loss as to what to do.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

With a twice exceptional student, I would advise you stay far away from K12 and Connections - despite their claims, they do not have a good rep (at all) of moving at the child's pace, and isn't considered flexible by most.

Ideally a dyslexic child would receive OG tutoring, but that does run about $50 per session, with a general mandatory session twice a week (so upwards of $400/monthly). If that is out of your price range, I absolutely do have more cost effective suggestions (my eldest is dyslexic; currently attending a private school for dyslexic children, but was home for a few years prior to that).

Apples and Pears Spelling ($45 per level)

Dancing Bears Reading (sister program to Apples and Pears Spelling - about $50 per level, I think)


For your other subjects, keep it simple this year:

Writing - PAL Writing, by Institute for Excellence in Writing ($89)

Mathematics - does she need constant review? If so, she needs a spiral program; CLE is a fantastic, cheap option ($45 per level, including teacher's manual). Does she prefer to thoroughly cover/master a skill area, with little review of that skill after? If so, you want a mastery program like Math Mammoth ($33 per level)

History - Story of the World. You need the text and activity book ($35 for both, if you buy from Amazon)

Science - I would take a literature based approach at this age. Buy some of the "Let's Read and Find Out Science" series, and some Magic School Bus books (cap it at, say, $50)... or you could use Behold and See science from Catholic Heritage Curriculum (I think the first and second grade levels are each about $25?)


romacox
by Silver Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 2:26 PM

How To Home School is a free article with lots of links to answer your questions.  There is even a section for children with special needs.

Chasing3
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2014 at 8:15 PM

schools seem to love to pass the buck on any type of learning disability and claim adhd. It's BS.

The situation seems like if they are saying they can't (or won't) do anything for her, then ANYTHING you do at home is better than what they can or will do.

What i personally did was completely throw myself into researching what is available for use at home. Keep googling and reading whatever you come across and start with whatever makes the most sense to you. I firmly believe you'll do better than the public school will. They'll never take the time to find something else, they'll never take the time to assess if it's working for your dd or not, they'll never make adjustments if it's not working, they'll just chug along with whatever it is they've got for a one-size-fits-all-curriculum and when it isn't working they'll claim: "ADHD! Adjust her meds!" 

My suggestion when it comes to cost would be - put all your money into a reading program if you believe you find one that will work. But also, don't buy more than you need to... if you can get half a year, or just part of a program, or find it used, start with that in case you find you want to switch. For example, you can get individual levels of Barton Reading and Spelling on ebay. And teh Dancing Bears mentioned above looks very affordable.

As for math, at the earliest grades, I really think you could do it for free with online worksheets and free manipulatives like beans for counting, dice, dominoes, card games, etc. As for content areas: you could do all of that for free pretty much... I'd just read, read, read to her on science and social studies and whatever other topics she's interested in from borrowed library books. I wouldn't run out and buy workbooks or textbooks. I'd be more apt to want to spend that money on arts and crafts and sciency-stuff like planting seeds, keeping a fish tank, etc. 

this site might be useful: http://dyslexia.yale.edu/Parents_homeschool.html 

lisayvonne
by on May. 2, 2014 at 11:09 AM


Quoting KickButtMama:

Not every homeschooler uses a boxed curriculum, which can be expensive. I usually budget in one online program - ixl.com, time4learning.com, etc. Then the rest of our curriculum I use fre resources.

but the first place to start with is your states requirements. Build your curriculum from there. 

Yep. I also make my curriculum this way. The online program I'm using is beestar. Math is free for all. Other subjects are also not expensive.

Lisa

tntmom1027
by Member on May. 2, 2014 at 2:22 PM

My son is 6 and we don't pay for anything. We use all free resources. We use Allinonehomeschool.com for Math and reading right now, and lessonpathways.com for Language arts, Science and History. 

My plan is to continue this next year as well, only thing I pay for is some stuff for science projects/experiments, arts and craft items, and extracurriculars and trips with the homeschool co-ops. 

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