Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

how hard could it be????

Posted by on May. 4, 2014 at 1:27 AM
  • 17 Replies
I got asked to consider leading an art group/class at our co-op for 3rd-5th graders. I'm thinking 9-14 kids maybe....

How hard could it be?

Those with experience... what am I in for?
by on May. 4, 2014 at 1:27 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
tuffymama
by Bronze Member on May. 4, 2014 at 7:55 AM
I have almost zero experience with this. The closest I have come was aiding a super-hippie type lady who acted as a facilitator in an art exploration course for a kids' summer program YEARS ago. There were fruit crates of sorted recyclables that had been gathered for construction and collage, some art history and artists' biographies materials, and so. much. paint. and glue. As I remember, the first part of each "class" was a bit of chat about a method or artist, then looking at pictures or slides, and then interpreting that work in groups or individually. It must have been about five or six hours long, because I remember us all eating lunch there, and I think it was M-W or M-Th. There was a bit of burnout, I think; the kids were allowed free rein to kind of go nuts on the remaining supplies in the winding down of the course, and they watched some movies.
jen2150
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 8:47 AM
How hard it is depends on the parents involved and how much help you have. I recommend having a helper especially for art. I run a local co-op. It is sressful but a lot of fun. How many weeks? I have found the longer the class the more stressful it is. Good luck on your endeavor. Let us know how it goes.
Bobcatridge
by Member on May. 4, 2014 at 10:56 AM

I was the helper for an art course that met once a week for an hour at my daughter's school (when she was going to the private school). The teacher taught college level art at the local college.  She would give background, show an example, sometimes do a demonstration, and then the kids would work on the project.  The projects frequently took several weeks to complete.  I helped with this course from 2nd through 5th grade and really enjoyed doing it. 

I have also taught digital photography to middle schoolers.  I usually had about 8 kids.  I was suppose to have a helper who showed once the first day and never appeared again.   I have done this course several times now.  I usually introduce the topic, give a hand-out with hints on the specific photographic topic, and then they would take photographs.  Periodically we would review their best photos on the specific topics as a group.  The first time through I had to decide on topics and write the hand-outs so it was more work the first time.  After that I had the curriculum set up and it was easy.  I did notice that certain groups tend to like certain topics better.  My daughter shows me scenic photos that one friend who took my course posts to Instagram and I am pleased to see her great photos.  It is fun to share my photographic passion with the kids.

I am new to homeschooling but my daughter who is now 13 will be in a hybrid charter school next year and I will be homeschooling 3 days a week and she will go to school 2 days a week.  When the charter school heard I had taught the photography course they asked if I would do it for middle schoolers and the high school as an extra curricular activity.  I have agreed to do it next year. 

As far as what it takes to do a course, well you have to be prepared for the class.  But if you really like art, I bet you will enjoy doing it.  Also realize that the older kids may not always want to cooperate and you may have to do something different to keep their interest.  For 9-14 kids you probably will appreciate a helper.  Try it.  You might love doing it. 

TidewaterClan
by on May. 4, 2014 at 12:37 PM

Will they have art supplies on hand for you to use, or will you have to purchase them?  THAT can be time consuming, especially if you have to hunt for sales/use five different 40% off coupons.  

It can also take a few hours to get everything organized, prepared, and ready to go.

All that being said I'll bet you have a ton of fun if you don't mind putting the time in.  I'd let the children give you ideas after the first class or two as well.  It would take some of the "what am I going to do?" pressure off of you and make it really enjoyable for them.   

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:16 PM
Wow. I'm getting an hour but they need to move between classes, so just under an hour when you get them settled.

I also only have the room for the class. I have a little clean up/tear down time. But I can't store stuff there and must bring and tote back and forth what I use.

Otherwise, I would love some recyclables and such for open art.




Quoting tuffymama: I have almost zero experience with this. The closest I have come was aiding a super-hippie type lady who acted as a facilitator in an art exploration course for a kids' summer program YEARS ago. There were fruit crates of sorted recyclables that had been gathered for construction and collage, some art history and artists' biographies materials, and so. much. paint. and glue. As I remember, the first part of each "class" was a bit of chat about a method or artist, then looking at pictures or slides, and then interpreting that work in groups or individually. It must have been about five or six hours long, because I remember us all eating lunch there, and I think it was M-W or M-Th. There was a bit of burnout, I think; the kids were allowed free rein to kind of go nuts on the remaining supplies in the winding down of the course, and they watched some movies.
KrissyKC
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:21 PM
1 mom liked this
I'm considering an extra materials fee of $5.00 per semester plus asking the kids to bring their own markers, crayons, pencils, good erasers, glue sticks, and kid scissors.

The $5.00 per semester will help with the costs of extra supplies and paper, plastic table cloths, etc.. It probably won't cover it all, but I should be able to keep my personal costs low.

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Will they have art supplies on hand for you to use, or will you have to purchase them?  THAT can be time consuming, especially if you have to hunt for sales/use five different 40% off coupons.  

It can also take a few hours to get everything organized, prepared, and ready to go.

All that being said I'll bet you have a ton of fun if you don't mind putting the time in.  I'd let the children give you ideas after the first class or two as well.  It would take some of the "what am I going to do?" pressure off of you and make it really enjoyable for them.   

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:30 PM
Photography sounds neat. I have no experience with it, but another lady has volunteered to do that class.

I'm hoping I can have a helper, but its such a new group that has ballooned in attendance, but still working out the kinks.

I'm going to not be overly ambitious. They have a leader for the little kids art (prek-2nd) and they have middle school and high school art. However, no one volunteered for the 3-5 grade and I said I could do a light class for them so they aren't left out.

I just want to enjoy the kids and help them learn to have fun with these projects.




Quoting Bobcatridge:

I was the helper for an art course that met once a week for an hour at my daughter's school (when she was going to the private school). The teacher taught college level art at the local college.  She would give background, show an example, sometimes do a demonstration, and then the kids would work on the project.  The projects frequently took several weeks to complete.  I helped with this course from 2nd through 5th grade and really enjoyed doing it. 


I have also taught digital photography to middle schoolers.  I usually had about 8 kids.  I was suppose to have a helper who showed once the first day and never appeared again.   I have done this course several times now.  I usually introduce the topic, give a hand-out with hints on the specific photographic topic, and then they would take photographs.  Periodically we would review their best photos on the specific topics as a group.  The first time through I had to decide on topics and write the hand-outs so it was more work the first time.  After that I had the curriculum set up and it was easy.  I did notice that certain groups tend to like certain topics better.  My daughter shows me scenic photos that one friend who took my course posts to Instagram and I am pleased to see her great photos.  It is fun to share my photographic passion with the kids.


I am new to homeschooling but my daughter who is now 13 will be in a hybrid charter school next year and I will be homeschooling 3 days a week and she will go to school 2 days a week.  When the charter school heard I had taught the photography course they asked if I would do it for middle schoolers and the high school as an extra curricular activity.  I have agreed to do it next year. 


As far as what it takes to do a course, well you have to be prepared for the class.  But if you really like art, I bet you will enjoy doing it.  Also realize that the older kids may not always want to cooperate and you may have to do something different to keep their interest.  For 9-14 kids you probably will appreciate a helper.  Try it.  You might love doing it. 

bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:36 PM

Are you certain of the class size?  I only ask because we had one particular art class last semester that over flowed.  The woman expected 20 kids and then the head of the co-op said, how about 25, then how about 30 and then well 32 signed up.  There wasn't the option of splitting the class.  So we ended up with 8 parents in there to help.  But if it weren't such a well-oiled co-op I'm not sure what would have happened to the poor woman.

sheramom4
by Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:49 PM

I teach three electives at a hybrid charter school. A crafting class and two year book classes. Next year we are switching it up to a crafting class, one yearbook/digital photography class and an Around the World cultural class. I limit those classes to 13 per class although Around the World will be more possibly. 

I currently have eleven crafting students and it works out great with a helper. 

KrissyKC
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 3:59 PM
The classrooms are too small for more than 10-14 kids. So yes, and she was supportive this year of class sizes. It will be first come/serve.

I would hold two at different times, but there is no child care for my youngest and dad is teaching three classes on computers and robotics. They are arranging it so that we don't overlap so one of us keeps the baby while the other teaches.

I think boundaries will be mostly respected. I mean, there is always room for human faults and error, but I'm content it will work.

No one expects high dollar classes, more like clubs and fun meetings.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Are you certain of the class size?  I only ask because we had one particular art class last semester that over flowed.  The woman expected 20 kids and then the head of the co-op said, how about 25, then how about 30 and then well 32 signed up.  There wasn't the option of splitting the class.  So we ended up with 8 parents in there to help.  But if it weren't such a well-oiled co-op I'm not sure what would have happened to the poor woman.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN