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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

What type of "homeschooling" do you consider to be the limit of "Real Homeschooling"

Posted by on May. 13, 2014 at 11:34 AM
  • 17 Replies

 

Poll

Question: Which type of homeschooling do you do/are thinking of doing?

Options:

A) public/private school at home

B) correspondence school

C) independent


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 41

View Results

I know we support whatever kind of learning at home a family may choose, but in your opinion, which option or options are Real Homeschooling to you--and why?  And which do you do or plan to do and why did you choose that method?  Have you changed over the years as your goals have changed?

A)  Any schooling regularly done by the children outside of a institutional (public or private) setting. Includes state or district sponored (paid for) online school options and homebound programs. (Most regulation--often have a teacher overseeing. Often have firm deadlines for assignments. Must follow state standards of learning. Hard to change curriculum--may be set by school or state)

B) Schooling done at home, but not anything sponsored (paid for by) the state or district. Includes correspondence schools, so long as the family is paying privately or through scholarship. (Regulation with freedom--advisor overseeing, may or may not have time limits to complete work. Changes in curriculum may have to be approved.)

C) Independent homeschooling. Anything where other than notifying the school district that the child is not enrolled in institutional school and showing proof of progress if the state requires, the parents and/or child choose the curriculum and learning goals and activities. (Most freedom, very little regulation, can change curriculum as needed.)  (anything from packaged curricula without advisor to eclectic to full unschooling)

by on May. 13, 2014 at 11:34 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mem82
by Platinum Member on May. 14, 2014 at 10:19 AM
2 moms liked this
Your last option is the only legal definition of homeschooling. I don't shun those that do it through the government or private school. Those people don't have the same freedom as homeschooler, though, really.
bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on May. 14, 2014 at 10:39 AM

Now I am certain there are people in this group that do public school at home and those that do private homeschooling groups.  So I wonder why those ladies haven't voted?


Precious333
by Julia on May. 14, 2014 at 10:53 AM
I do the first option. I use a charter, we get money for curriculum and classes. I am considered the teacher and I am responsible for 90% of their education (or some.number like that according to the charter) and we have an educational specialist. We have to take attendence and turn in work monthly. I honestly dont like it, but it's great to have the funds.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on May. 14, 2014 at 11:13 AM
1 mom liked this

Your options are a bit confusing. Our state considers us "independent" homeschoolers - we have to register with an accountability association (we pay them a small fee, they account for that we have a GED/high school diploma, are homeschooling child x during year xxxx, nothing more). We aren't required to test, only to keep attendance, teach 180 days a year, and teach the core subjects.

As for us, personally - we classify ourselves as "traditionally scholastic". We use an eclectic mix of materials, but it very much resembles a Catholic school education at home.

Also, I want to address your first line. While I support a person's legal ability to homeschool their child in the manner in which they choose, I will not go so far as to say that I personally support every method of home education. I'll fight any government attempt to regulate it, but I have very strong feelings about certain methods.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















hipmomto3
by Bronze Member on May. 14, 2014 at 11:47 AM

I agree with the bolded parts. I personally don't worry about whether someone is doing "real homeschooling" or not. I know parents who use K12 and consider it homeschool and parents who use K12 and don't - they consider it "school at home." Definitions don't really matter.

I also am opposed to any government regulation of homeschooling, yet like AutymsMommy have serious issue with the methods employed by a tiny number of homeschooling families. Not just the ones you hear about in the media where a seventeen year old can't read... but even in real life, I've met a few families whose methods (or lack of any method) were creating serious deficiencies for their children. 

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Your options are a bit confusing. Our state considers us "independent" homeschoolers - we have to register with an accountability association (we pay them a small fee, they account for that we have a GED/high school diploma, are homeschooling child x during year xxxx, nothing more). We aren't required to test, only to keep attendance, teach 180 days a year, and teach the core subjects.

As for us, personally - we classify ourselves as "traditionally scholastic". We use an eclectic mix of materials, but it very much resembles a Catholic school education at home.

Also, I want to address your first line. While I support a person's legal ability to homeschool their child in the manner in which they choose, I will not go so far as to say that I personally support every method of home education. I'll fight any government attempt to regulate it, but I have very strong feelings about certain methods.


oahoah
by Member on May. 14, 2014 at 1:46 PM

We are going into our 4th year of independently homeschooling our boys.  We chose this as we didn't want anything to do with our public schools. However I don't consider it more "real" than someone who does k12 or is involved with the school system. We all have the same goal (to educate our kids as best as we can) and how we go about it is of little consequence to me.  In our city there is a big gap between the homeschoolers who choose to have funding through the school district and those who choose to remain independent. It's pretty sad that both sides feel compelled to judge someone else's choices.  I am hopeful that we can continue to remain independent of our public school system but am trying not to feel righteous over someone who is dependent on it.

Jinx-Troublex3
by Jinx on May. 14, 2014 at 1:49 PM
1 mom liked this
I didnt vote because I took a few days off...lol i also would need an "other" option.

I use a charter school but consider myself a "real" homeschooler because I have full say over their curriculum. Yes, the state pays for it but I choose it all and do all my own lesson plans. I do report what we do once a month to the state (i tell them what we do..it is not us doing what we are told and confirming it) We also opt out of the annual testing.

What I dont consider homeschooling is anyone who uses the state curriculum and has to follow their lesson plans and the state standards.

K-12 is one program I strongly disagree with after doing it in my home with my nephew for a year. That is not homeschooling. We had no say in what got done, had required online classes and daily time logs. It was a major headache!
TidewaterClan
by on May. 14, 2014 at 7:32 PM
1 mom liked this

We are independent, according to the list.  I choose the entire curricula and create our lesson plans.  We're secular, with a sprinkling of Catholic (Latin Regit!) mixed in.  We resemble a strong classroom (not at desks of course), and conquer more than the girls did in public school.

We also average two to three field trips a month.  We visit the children's museums, historical museums and sites, the zoo, and the Air Force Museum.  It's a wonderful way to reinforce what they're learning.


I agree with several other ladies.  I don't want the government to regulate homeschoolers any more than they do, but I would never consider the more relaxed methods for our home. 

Precious333
by Julia on May. 14, 2014 at 7:44 PM
That's sad. I never felt judged by using the charter, i know many who use it and many who dont and no one thinks ill of any one who does it differently. I do know some who dont loke.certain methods and have a strong opinion, but still no strong division.

Quoting oahoah:

We are going into our 4th year of independently homeschooling our boys.  We chose this as we didn't want anything to do with our public schools. However I don't consider it more "real" than someone who does k12 or is involved with the school system. We all have the same goal (to educate our kids as best as we can) and how we go about it is of little consequence to me.  In our city there is a big gap between the homeschoolers who choose to have funding through the school district and those who choose to remain independent. It's pretty sad that both sides feel compelled to judge someone else's choices.  I am hopeful that we can continue to remain independent of our public school system but am trying not to feel righteous over someone who is dependent on it.

jen2150
by Silver Member on May. 15, 2014 at 8:48 AM
2 moms liked this
I would say when you cannot choose your own materials or schedule then you are no longer homeschooling. There is nothing wrong with that method of education. I am an quasi unschooler with A charlotte mason bent. We started out traditional and found it was hurting my kids desire to learn. There is not a subject they do not love. My oldest is on the gifted side and needs a lot of freedom. I don't there are any bad methods. It is above their implementation and how they are working for the child.
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