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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Need help to start homeschooling

Posted by on May. 15, 2014 at 4:39 PM
  • 11 Replies

My kids are 10 and 7. They have been in public school (which I have never been thrilled with) but our school district is making some changes and I just cannot in good consience continue to send them there. I want to homeschool, I just get so overwhelmed when I think about it, I don't know where to start! We have some co-ops in the area, I'm not sure what that entails, and if I want to be involved in them or not. Another problem is that we are bursting at the seams in our house, we have NO extra space for supplies, or anything. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.


by on May. 15, 2014 at 4:39 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jen2150
by Silver Member on May. 15, 2014 at 5:54 PM
1 mom liked this
I would start this summer by reading some homeschooling books. Join some groups and get to know some local Homeschoolers. Talk to your kids about things they may be interested in. Form a plan for the year but remain flexible enough to change it as you go. Don't be too hard on yourself. You will learn as you go. There will be easy and hard days. Everyone organizes differently. I would do some google searches for ideas. Feel free to ask anything.
BellaRose17
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 5:57 PM

Don't forget to check out your state's regulations! It might have an impact on how you go about beginning :) Good luck! I'm brand new, myself <3 

Bobcatridge
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 7:21 PM

I went online and found several web sites for homeschooling in my state.  I got some names, emails and phone numbers for some relatively local homeschool groups.  I contacted them and they referred me to some charter homeschools.  I called several of these schools.  I also talked to a few people who homeschooled - several towns over.  We live in a rural area so the local co-ops and homeschool groups don't seem to exist or I haven't found them yet.  I also called k12.  Now those people seem a little pushy - immediately after I filled out their form asking for more information they called me.  Since we thought we might end up doing emergency homeschooling I also looked up how to declare myself a private school, the required forms, and how to do it.  I also am in the process of reading on several different curriculums and deciding what is best.  My 13 yr old daughter will be going to a charter hybrid school for 8th grade next year.  It will be homeschool 3 days/week and school 2 days/week.  The 2 days a week will be on history and science with literature and art on the history time period they are studying.  I am responsible for math, composition, grammar, spelling, etc.  I am suspect of the quality of the science so we will be including science too.  The math teacher at her old school is involved with math homeschooling programs and he is giving us some input on choosing the best math program.  Since my daughter is advanced in math his help is greatly appreciated.

Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on May. 15, 2014 at 9:43 PM
1 mom liked this

Here are my best tips for people new to homeschooling:

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.

ali840
by New Member on May. 15, 2014 at 11:42 PM
Those are all great ideas, thanks so much! I know a couple people who homeschool, I think I will get in touch with them :)

Quoting jen2150: I would start this summer by reading some homeschooling books. Join some groups and get to know some local Homeschoolers. Talk to your kids about things they may be interested in. Form a plan for the year but remain flexible enough to change it as you go. Don't be too hard on yourself. You will learn as you go. There will be easy and hard days. Everyone organizes differently. I would do some google searches for ideas. Feel free to ask anything.
ali840
by New Member on May. 15, 2014 at 11:45 PM
Thanks! I will check into our local regulations. Good luck to you, too

Quoting BellaRose17:

Don't forget to check out your state's regulations! It might have an impact on how you go about beginning :) Good luck! I'm brand new, myself <3 

ali840
by New Member on May. 16, 2014 at 12:39 AM
Is k12 the online school? Also, what is emergency homeschooling? Thanks for the ideas!

Quoting Bobcatridge:

I went online and found several web sites for homeschooling in my state.  I got some names, emails and phone numbers for some relatively local homeschool groups.  I contacted them and they referred me to some charter homeschools.  I called several of these schools.  I also talked to a few people who homeschooled - several towns over.  We live in a rural area so the local co-ops and homeschool groups don't seem to exist or I haven't found them yet.  I also called k12.  Now those people seem a little pushy - immediately after I filled out their form asking for more information they called me.  Since we thought we might end up doing emergency homeschooling I also looked up how to declare myself a private school, the required forms, and how to do it.  I also am in the process of reading on several different curriculums and deciding what is best.  My 13 yr old daughter will be going to a charter hybrid school for 8th grade next year.  It will be homeschool 3 days/week and school 2 days/week.  The 2 days a week will be on history and science with literature and art on the history time period they are studying.  I am responsible for math, composition, grammar, spelling, etc.  I am suspect of the quality of the science so we will be including science too.  The math teacher at her old school is involved with math homeschooling programs and he is giving us some input on choosing the best math program.  Since my daughter is advanced in math his help is greatly appreciated.

ali840
by New Member on May. 16, 2014 at 12:48 AM
Thank you so much! Everything you said is so helpful, and makes so much sense!

I don't want to fight with the kids and make them do their schoolwork. I LOVE the idea of de-schooling, letting them find what interests them, but who loves long division and algebra? Those are things they have to know and I doubt they'll be dying to learn them. How does that work?

My 10 year old is already asking how homeschooling looks on a college application, and I don't know what to tell him because I can't imagine it looks good. I said he shouldn't worry about it and left it at that for now. I need to do some research on that subject, I suppose. As well as many others.

Thank you so much again!


Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Here are my best tips for people new to homeschooling:


1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site
rather than HSLDA


http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm


2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high
school degree, GED, college and so on.


3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.


http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html


4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The
Teenage Liberation Handbook
.


5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a
full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of
money.


6. Be flexible, expect change.


7. Locate local groups and resources.


8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each
other.


9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to
spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is
de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.



Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private
schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had
told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and
believed it.


Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't
like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone.
It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over
the years.

Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on May. 16, 2014 at 9:36 AM

When you sit down with them and ask them what they might like to become, career wise, you can then, with them chart out what they need to learn. When they see the need long division and algebra, they are more likely to be willing to learn it.

Deschooling is a very helpful thing IMO but it doesn't last forever.

It depends on the college how they feel about homeschooling. I personally did not mention homeschooling at all when my kids applied for college. Both won scholarships, one academic and one athletic to college. Admission wasn't a problem at all. We did use a local accredited cover school, which issued the diploma and transcripts but I could have done that myself. Some colleges will not believe you really schooled them. Others actually look for homeschooled kids because, generally, they are self starters and love to learn.

The Teenage Liberation Handbook has a great section in which department heads of universities say what they look for in incoming freshmen. That section was my fav and I learned a lot from it.

I did require both of my kids to take a college course while still in high school and to prepare for a CLEP test in one subject. That way they knew what a college class was like and that you could do up to two years cheaper through studying and CLEP testing.

Quoting ali840: Thank you so much! Everything you said is so helpful, and makes so much sense! I don't want to fight with the kids and make them do their schoolwork. I LOVE the idea of de-schooling, letting them find what interests them, but who loves long division and algebra? Those are things they have to know and I doubt they'll be dying to learn them. How does that work? My 10 year old is already asking how homeschooling looks on a college application, and I don't know what to tell him because I can't imagine it looks good. I said he shouldn't worry about it and left it at that for now. I need to do some research on that subject, I suppose. As well as many others. Thank you so much again!
Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Here are my best tips for people new to homeschooling:

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.


Bobcatridge
by Member on May. 16, 2014 at 10:04 AM

 k12 is an online school.  They have both public (free) and private.  My understanding is that in the public option there are actual online classes that your child attends at specified times.  I have read some pros and cons on the program.  I considered it as a back up plan for us.

Emergency homeschooling is when you immediately need to homeschool because your child is unable to continue attending the present school for whatever reason.  In our case, my daughter was being bullied and went into a severe depression and was suicidal.  The private school allowed her to take a two week leave of absence and said if we needed more we would have to get a formal homeschool program because they had no homeschool program.  She returned to school for 6 weeks and she is now on medical leave for the rest of the school year.  They have agreed that she has completed 7th grade.  Academics wasn't the problem.  She has A's and one B+.  They gave her the report card as of her last day of school.  They just wanted the problem gone.  I was really hunting up homeschool information in a panic during all of this.

Quoting ali840: Is k12 the online school? Also, what is emergency homeschooling? Thanks for the ideas!
Quoting Bobcatridge:

I went online and found several web sites for homeschooling in my state.  I got some names, emails and phone numbers for some relatively local homeschool groups.  I contacted them and they referred me to some charter homeschools.  I called several of these schools.  I also talked to a few people who homeschooled - several towns over.  We live in a rural area so the local co-ops and homeschool groups don't seem to exist or I haven't found them yet.  I also called k12.  Now those people seem a little pushy - immediately after I filled out their form asking for more information they called me.  Since we thought we might end up doing emergency homeschooling I also looked up how to declare myself a private school, the required forms, and how to do it.  I also am in the process of reading on several different curriculums and deciding what is best.  My 13 yr old daughter will be going to a charter hybrid school for 8th grade next year.  It will be homeschool 3 days/week and school 2 days/week.  The 2 days a week will be on history and science with literature and art on the history time period they are studying.  I am responsible for math, composition, grammar, spelling, etc.  I am suspect of the quality of the science so we will be including science too.  The math teacher at her old school is involved with math homeschooling programs and he is giving us some input on choosing the best math program.  Since my daughter is advanced in math his help is greatly appreciated.

 

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