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7th grade plans... care to weigh in?

Posted by on May. 19, 2014 at 10:50 AM
  • 5 Replies

DD12, dyslexic (and we suspect written expression disorder; psych ed eval in June to verify). Spent the past year not progressing in a private school for dyslexic children. Mathy, science gal, who also loves art. We're aiming for high content, without overwhelming her with texts too difficult for her to read. With that said, I'll likely buy double of every content subject curriculum, and maybe math, so that I can read alongside her to help.

Monday-Thursday are work as usual days; Friday is our "fun" or "light" day - when we have co-op, no work at home, when we do not have co-op, we'll do geography through art, patty paper geometry instead of our regular math, spelling as usual (needs daily), and a literature project, science projects, etc.

Sequence:

Maths: review Pre-Algebra this summer, move into Algebra 1 this fall.

Writing: Basic paragraph formation, essays, outlines

Spelling: basic

Literature: American

History: Modern World History

Geography: physcial world geography

Religion: Confirmation Prep (maybe) - definitely CCD and youth group at our parish

Science: Biochem

Grammar


Curriculum (basic consideration - still making adjustments):

Maths: Jousting Armadillos *series of 3* to make up a pre-algebra review and Algebra 1 program; AOPS Intro o Algebra either in conjunction with the JA series, or as a supplment.

World History: Light to the Nations volume 2 (Catholic School Textbook Project)

Writing: IEW SWI-B

Spelling: Apples and Pears C (and D if we get to it)

Literature: Put together by Mom!

Geography: Mapping the World With Art (Ellen McHenry); Runkle's World Physical Geography (reading from text only; no workbook or mapping)

Religion: CCD at church, maybe Faith and Life online, definitely Friendly Defenders for apologetics

Science: Ellen McHenry's "Cells", "The Brain", "Elements", and "Carbon Chemistry", with biochem plans and labs.

Grammar: IEW's "Fix It!"

soccer, youth group, co-op

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















by on May. 19, 2014 at 10:50 AM
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Replies (1-5):
jen2150
by Silver Member on May. 19, 2014 at 12:34 PM
I have a 7th grader as well. So hard to believe. We are starting pre-algebra through math u see this year. It sounds strange saying that. We are doing two different science programs this year. One for co-op and one for home. I am cutting our schedule this year as well. We need more time at home. Have a great summer!
TidewaterClan
by on May. 19, 2014 at 2:12 PM

Wonderful list!

We're using "myWorldGeography" for our social studies.  My dad is in several gaming groups, and highly recommended "Ticket To Ride - Days of Wonder" as a fun addition for United States geography.  A lady at the hs convention said she uses it, along with "Ticket To Ride - Europe," and her children love both.   


The UPS fellow just delivered most of our literature today. :)  I'm going to select a few from Seton's recommended classics list, but Pearson has language arts 40% off this month; that includes novels that compliment their reading program.  We purchased Journey of the Sparrows, Our Town, Lost in Yonkers, Heat, and Let the Circle Be Unbroken to name a few. Just FYI of course!  :)

I sincerely hope your daughter learns to love science and math again.  This year has made a HUGE difference in those for both of my girls.   

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on May. 19, 2014 at 2:21 PM

Have you seen Mosdos Literature?

It's purdy (lol).

www.mosdospress.com

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Wonderful list!

We're using "myWorldGeography" for our social studies.  My dad is in several gaming groups, and highly recommended "Ticket To Ride - Days of Wonder" as a fun addition for United States geography.  A lady at the hs convention said she uses it, along with "Ticket To Ride - Europe," and her children love both.   


The UPS fellow just delivered most of our literature today. :)  I'm going to select a few from Seton's recommended classics list, but Pearson has language arts 40% off this month; that includes novels that compliment their reading program.  We purchased Journey of the Sparrows, Our Town, Lost in Yonkers, Heat, and Let the Circle Be Unbroken to name a few. Just FYI of course!  :)

I sincerely hope your daughter learns to love science and math again.  This year has made a HUGE difference in those for both of my girls.   


I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on May. 19, 2014 at 4:27 PM


Quoting AutymsMommy:

DD12, dyslexic (and we suspect written expression disorder; psych ed eval in June to verify). Spent the past year not progressing in a private school for dyslexic children. Mathy, science gal, who also loves art. We're aiming for high content, without overwhelming her with texts too difficult for her to read. With that said, I'll likely buy double of every content subject curriculum, and maybe math, so that I can read alongside her to help.

Monday-Thursday are work as usual days; Friday is our "fun" or "light" day - when we have co-op, no work at home, when we do not have co-op, we'll do geography through art, patty paper geometry instead of our regular math, spelling as usual (needs daily), and a literature project, science projects, etc.

Sequence:

Maths: review Pre-Algebra this summer, move into Algebra 1 this fall.

Writing: Basic paragraph formation, essays, outlines

Spelling: basic

Literature: American

History: Modern World History

Geography: physcial world geography

Religion: Confirmation Prep (maybe) - definitely CCD and youth group at our parish

Science: Biochem

Grammar


Curriculum (basic consideration - still making adjustments):

Maths: Jousting Armadillos *series of 3* to make up a pre-algebra review and Algebra 1 program; AOPS Intro o Algebra either in conjunction with the JA series, or as a supplment.

World History: Light to the Nations volume 2 (Catholic School Textbook Project)

Writing: IEW SWI-B

Spelling: Apples and Pears C (and D if we get to it)

Literature: Put together by Mom!

Geography: Mapping the World With Art (Ellen McHenry); Runkle's World Physical Geography (reading from text only; no workbook or mapping)

Religion: CCD at church, maybe Faith and Life online, definitely Friendly Defenders for apologetics

Science: Ellen McHenry's "Cells", "The Brain", "Elements", and "Carbon Chemistry", with biochem plans and labs.

Grammar: IEW's "Fix It!"

soccer, youth group, co-op

My ds is newly 13 and we are just finishing up 7th grade, although we will continue minimal stuff through the summer.  He has VP issues and is dyslexic.  8th grade will look a lot like 7th grade and we'll be using many of the same materials.  Reading:  We stopped trying to make novels work and went with fun poetry, reading comprehension workbooks, and more independent reading of (short sections of) his science, history, and geography textbooks.   Writing:  This is also basic, focusing on written narrations and science lab writeups.  Grammar isn't formal this year or next (we did finish Hake's Grammar 6 last year), but I do plan on trying Killgallons books for high school.  Spelling and Vocabulary: are coming from fun high school level books called Daily Sparks.  Ds just picks whatever page looks good and does it.  The books don't build upon themselves so going out of order is no problem and gives him some control over it.  I just put the date and a checkmark on the page he did.

Math:  I believe in math mastery (but with a spiral program), and we use whatever works.  This year we are using Teaching Textbooks Algebra 1 after finishing Saxon Algebra 1/2 in January.   But we throw in some Life of Fred Algebra, too, when ds has trouble with a concept.   History:  We are currently doing Ancients and use K12 Human Odyssey 1 because it's an easy and interesting read, although it does tend to go off on tangents.  But I've learned to skim through it and have ds read just the important stuff.  We get through the book quicker and it does keep ds's interest that way.  We'll use book 2 (1400-1914 AD) for 8th grade.   Geography is Runkle's.  We like it and ds has learned to take notes from it.  Science:  We use Apologia, mainly for the experiments.  I buy the text and the lab kit and that's all.  We read most of it together and skip the parts we don't need (I like Apologia and will get Physical Science for 8th grade).   Spanish has surprisingly been a big hit this year.  Ds uses the Getting Started with Spanish book which has very quick lessons that he does independently.  Each lesson builds upon the previous ones.  

He just started getting a lot more independent this year with his reading.  I give him short sections to read by himself - usually 1 to 1.5 pages and he either does a verbal or written narration.  I try to have him do 1-2 written narrations per week.  

We do formal academics 5 days a week for 1-2 hours a day.  It's a schedule that has been incredibly effective for ds's dyslexia - his interest is kept up and he retains what he learns.  The goal has been to get him to do a lot of his work independently and learn how to write an essay.  Two years ago he was barely reading.  As soon as I got him formally diagnosed, I formulated a multi-sensoral plan of action and he is currently on or maybe even above grade level in reading now.  His writing still needs some work - the content is good, the mechanics aren't.  But I see so much improvement from 2 years ago.  He pursues his interests for the rest of the day and I facilitate them as best I can.  He has done martial arts classes and CCD this year.  He will continue with those next year and be a Confirmand as well.

We're shooting for "high content" without it being overwhelming, just as you are.  There's no perfect way to do it and both of us will probably be tweaking our plans again and again throughout the new school year.  Good luck and congrats on having your dd home again. 

______________________________

Angela

DD(20) Hair Stylist (in training) in downtown Manhattan, graduating in late summer
DD(17) Dancer at the (real) Fame school, performing arts conservatory in the fall 
DS(13) Experiential homeschooler, mixed martial artist, Confirmand

CITYSCHOOLING

TidewaterClan
by on May. 19, 2014 at 9:34 PM

OOoooooo!  Those are right purdy!  I'm going back over to check those out in more detail. Thanks!  

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Have you seen Mosdos Literature?

It's purdy (lol).

www.mosdospress.com

Quoting TidewaterClan:

Wonderful list!

We're using "myWorldGeography" for our social studies.  My dad is in several gaming groups, and highly recommended "Ticket To Ride - Days of Wonder" as a fun addition for United States geography.  A lady at the hs convention said she uses it, along with "Ticket To Ride - Europe," and her children love both.   


The UPS fellow just delivered most of our literature today. :)  I'm going to select a few from Seton's recommended classics list, but Pearson has language arts 40% off this month; that includes novels that compliment their reading program.  We purchased Journey of the Sparrows, Our Town, Lost in Yonkers, Heat, and Let the Circle Be Unbroken to name a few. Just FYI of course!  :)

I sincerely hope your daughter learns to love science and math again.  This year has made a HUGE difference in those for both of my girls.   



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