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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

We have found a program here in Hawaii that is sorta run like K12 it's a branch off of them I guess.  But anyways we have gotten thru the assement phase and some things have been happening that have me worried about the program....  So I'm just wondering if any of you moms use K12 and if you do what do you think of it?

by on Jul. 23, 2014 at 4:13 PM
Replies (21-28):
mommy2girls0506
by on Jul. 24, 2014 at 11:47 PM

Oh I didn't think you did.  I was just saying I'm not one of those moms I enjoy helping my kids and teaching them.  I like the idea of having cirrculum cause I could use some help with that but I still want the ultimate teaching of them.  I worry cause I have a special needs child and I don't know how she is going to do with the program.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I'm sorry, I didn't mean it sounded like you.  It just got lonely as someone who does do most of the teaching because there really weren't many other moms around who were actually teaching.

What worries do you have about the program?  Our biggest problem came with the assessments.  My oldest reads really fast to himself, but out loud he does voices and inflection (like really good readers do) but it slowed him down.  He read 86 words per minute; they wanted 88 words per minute and although the teacher who administered the test wrote a glowing recommendation, they stopped allowing us to work at our own pace.  He needed to sit in on the online lessons and it was at least 4 months behind the lesson we were working through.  

We had a lot of little things like that happen that made it seem as though they only say you can work at your own pace to get you to sign up with them.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

I totally understand what you are saying and that's not me.  I have worries about the program I'm getting into but I hope it will be okay.  I know for sure I have got to get some straight answers.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

We used it for a while.  It was far too structured for us and even less lenient than the local public school (brick and mortar).  Plus as we met more of the parents there were less and less that I considered "homeschoolers" there were many that were just sitting their child in front of the computer and letting the cyber-teacher "teach" them.  Not that all the parents were like that, but a lot of them.  So I couldn't get as much help as I had thought I would.



mommy2girls0506
by on Jul. 24, 2014 at 11:50 PM

Thanks we are playing this by ear for now and we still have time before the school year starts to feel things out a bit more.

Quoting hipmomto3:

A friend of mine who used it in another state where it's free (Utah) gave me her old materials (we live in Indiana, where K12 is not free unless you have medical reasons to not be in school). I have to say, I was NOT impressed with the materials. I have another friend who uses it in SC and she really likes it, it works for them. I don't think it'd be a good fit for us. However, I think with ASD the structure could really be a good thing. It just depends on what you are hoping to get out of it, I think.


bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 8:59 AM

I would certainly worry about using the program with a SN child!  (In my best Darth Vader voice) "The program is not as forgiving as you can be."  (Yeah, I know I'm a geek!)  There are some great curriculums out there that have everything mapped out for you; I would try those before using K12.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Oh I didn't think you did.  I was just saying I'm not one of those moms I enjoy helping my kids and teaching them.  I like the idea of having cirrculum cause I could use some help with that but I still want the ultimate teaching of them.  I worry cause I have a special needs child and I don't know how she is going to do with the program.

Quoting bluerooffarm:


mommy2girls0506
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 11:19 PM

Yea that's my worry could you give me some of the other ones names?  I have to start looking into other places just so I can keep my choices open.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I would certainly worry about using the program with a SN child!  (In my best Darth Vader voice) "The program is not as forgiving as you can be."  (Yeah, I know I'm a geek!)  There are some great curriculums out there that have everything mapped out for you; I would try those before using K12.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Oh I didn't think you did.  I was just saying I'm not one of those moms I enjoy helping my kids and teaching them.  I like the idea of having cirrculum cause I could use some help with that but I still want the ultimate teaching of them.  I worry cause I have a special needs child and I don't know how she is going to do with the program.

Quoting bluerooffarm:



bluerooffarm
by Gold Member on Jul. 26, 2014 at 10:21 AM
1 mom liked this

Do you want secular or religious?  We do mostly secular, so I know those.  We use McGraw-Hill for science.  When we bought the textbook and the workbook, it came with a "topic map" that broke down the lessons into a timeline: day 1 do this, ect.  I could move the topics around and still have cohesive units to work through.

I use Math U See.  My oldest uses it without my help at all.  It doesn't have an exact timeline like our science does but we watch the video (so the creator of the curriculum actually teaches the lesson), then work through the worksheets, reading the textbook when we need to, and taking the test at the end of the week.  The manipulatives are great for some special needs and for kinesthetic learners.

Now for History we use Story of the World.  It is a Protestant curriculum and it is noticable.  But I love it, so I do add in discussions for the kids about how the religious perspective might be biasing the material.  We bought the activity book from Peacehillpress.  I do it pretty much as the book The Well Trained Mind suggests; each day read a section of the chapter and have the student find the location on a globe, draw a picture and write 2 sentences in their journal.  When we find sections that we are interested in learning more in depth, we find library books to read deeper.  Each book so far has had about 40 chapters, so moving a little faster than a chapter a week will get you through the book by the end of the year.  The activity book walks you through discussion questions for the section, walks you through the map work, and then has student pages with coloring and stuff,  along with activities that are hands-on.  We couldn't do it all, but it helped me know I was getting a good amount into them each year.  It also covers much more World history than any PS curriculum I've seen.  (It's only good for elementary years though) We plan on either moving to the other Susan Wise Bauer's books or to the Kingfisher, but then I'll need to make my own supplements for it.

For Language Arts-- Time for Kids Grammar Rules, Editor-in-chief series, Hooked on Phonics boxed set, Handwriting Without Tears, Spelling You See, Houghton Mifflin Reading, and a selection of novels with their reading guides combine for us to make some that are all laid out and some that I can do on my own.  Time, SyouS, HOP, HwoT, and HMReaders are set up where you just follow along and do an exercise each day.  But the HMreader only has 25 stories in it, so adding in the novels is a must!  HOP has a set of CDs that tells you exactly what to do and say for each workbook page but is also easy to tweak to speed up or slow down when necessary.

So that's the core of what we do....

For religious curriculum, many of my friends from co-op use Sonlight, Abeka, or My Father's World.  But I don't know how academic, scholastic, or rigorous they are since I've never personally used them.  I know they all seem to like them, but I don't know.  There is also Bob Jone's University...I wouldn't tough it with a 10 foot pole, because it is soooo very Christian, but there are many who like it too.

Sorry that got so long.  I hope it was helpful.


Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Yea that's my worry could you give me some of the other ones names?  I have to start looking into other places just so I can keep my choices open.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I would certainly worry about using the program with a SN child!  (In my best Darth Vader voice) "The program is not as forgiving as you can be."  (Yeah, I know I'm a geek!)  There are some great curriculums out there that have everything mapped out for you; I would try those before using K12.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Oh I didn't think you did.  I was just saying I'm not one of those moms I enjoy helping my kids and teaching them.  I like the idea of having cirrculum cause I could use some help with that but I still want the ultimate teaching of them.  I worry cause I have a special needs child and I don't know how she is going to do with the program.

Quoting bluerooffarm:




mommy2girls0506
by on Jul. 26, 2014 at 6:07 PM
1 mom liked this

Thank you it did

Quoting bluerooffarm:

Do you want secular or religious?  We do mostly secular, so I know those.  We use McGraw-Hill for science.  When we bought the textbook and the workbook, it came with a "topic map" that broke down the lessons into a timeline: day 1 do this, ect.  I could move the topics around and still have cohesive units to work through.

I use Math U See.  My oldest uses it without my help at all.  It doesn't have an exact timeline like our science does but we watch the video (so the creator of the curriculum actually teaches the lesson), then work through the worksheets, reading the textbook when we need to, and taking the test at the end of the week.  The manipulatives are great for some special needs and for kinesthetic learners.

Now for History we use Story of the World.  It is a Protestant curriculum and it is noticable.  But I love it, so I do add in discussions for the kids about how the religious perspective might be biasing the material.  We bought the activity book from Peacehillpress.  I do it pretty much as the book The Well Trained Mind suggests; each day read a section of the chapter and have the student find the location on a globe, draw a picture and write 2 sentences in their journal.  When we find sections that we are interested in learning more in depth, we find library books to read deeper.  Each book so far has had about 40 chapters, so moving a little faster than a chapter a week will get you through the book by the end of the year.  The activity book walks you through discussion questions for the section, walks you through the map work, and then has student pages with coloring and stuff,  along with activities that are hands-on.  We couldn't do it all, but it helped me know I was getting a good amount into them each year.  It also covers much more World history than any PS curriculum I've seen.  (It's only good for elementary years though) We plan on either moving to the other Susan Wise Bauer's books or to the Kingfisher, but then I'll need to make my own supplements for it.

For Language Arts-- Time for Kids Grammar Rules, Editor-in-chief series, Hooked on Phonics boxed set, Handwriting Without Tears, Spelling You See, Houghton Mifflin Reading, and a selection of novels with their reading guides combine for us to make some that are all laid out and some that I can do on my own.  Time, SyouS, HOP, HwoT, and HMReaders are set up where you just follow along and do an exercise each day.  But the HMreader only has 25 stories in it, so adding in the novels is a must!  HOP has a set of CDs that tells you exactly what to do and say for each workbook page but is also easy to tweak to speed up or slow down when necessary.

So that's the core of what we do....

For religious curriculum, many of my friends from co-op use Sonlight, Abeka, or My Father's World.  But I don't know how academic, scholastic, or rigorous they are since I've never personally used them.  I know they all seem to like them, but I don't know.  There is also Bob Jone's University...I wouldn't tough it with a 10 foot pole, because it is soooo very Christian, but there are many who like it too.

Sorry that got so long.  I hope it was helpful.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Yea that's my worry could you give me some of the other ones names?  I have to start looking into other places just so I can keep my choices open.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

I would certainly worry about using the program with a SN child!  (In my best Darth Vader voice) "The program is not as forgiving as you can be."  (Yeah, I know I'm a geek!)  There are some great curriculums out there that have everything mapped out for you; I would try those before using K12.

Quoting mommy2girls0506:

Oh I didn't think you did.  I was just saying I'm not one of those moms I enjoy helping my kids and teaching them.  I like the idea of having cirrculum cause I could use some help with that but I still want the ultimate teaching of them.  I worry cause I have a special needs child and I don't know how she is going to do with the program.

Quoting bluerooffarm:




kbhe3605
by on Sep. 8, 2014 at 11:22 PM
1 mom liked this

We have been a K12 family for 13 years and love it!  We used it as independent study (homeschoolers) for grades k-8 and enrolled in K12's International Academy for high school. It is a great mix of online and offline learning and activities. As independent homeschoolers, you have complete freedom and flexibility to educate your children with a wonderful tool/resouces/information, etc. In k-8, it is mastery based, so I would read the objectives for the day, sometimes do the actual lesson, sometimes get creative with how we mastered the content. But I know if I followed the basic plan for each course, my children would get a high level, comprehensive education.  The International Academy continues to meet my high standards for education and flexibility within the home and add the bonus of a teacher for each class that is available for the students each day in office hours as well as weekly online sessions with other students from around the world.  The non-academic (course related) resources are great as well in helping them discern their future goals and come up with a plan to achieve them.

crekee
by New Member on Sep. 9, 2014 at 2:28 AM

I love K12. I live in California and I am on my second year with k12. My son loves it as well. He does well with the one on one attention. 

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