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2nd Grade Curriculum for Non-Reader?

Posted by on Jul. 30, 2014 at 1:08 PM
  • 11 Replies

HELP!!! I am feeling VERY overwhelmed at coming up with a curriculum to use with my duaghter this year. She is entering 2nd grade, and it is our 3rd year homeschooling (we started 2 weeks into Kindergarten) 

We already use Time4Learning (though have not used it much in the past 4-5 months)  and are very consistent with Reading Eggs and Math Seeds which she loves. She has begun to read the BOB books pretty consistently, but had a serious speech delay and is far behind her peers in reading skills. 

So.....I need serious help!!!

Here is what we have done - and are doing - we are already ramping back up and into the school year as of this week - slowly with Rock n Leanr Phonics DVD's, Reading Eggs, Math Seeds, and her daily reading time with Mom and Dad as well as her reading at least 1 or 2 BOB books daily. 

Subjects:

Language Arts - With her speech delay, I know Reading/Language Arts/etc needs to be top of our list. what curriculum is cheap an easy to use for helping her bridge that gap and start reading?

Math - Best curriculum for a hands on learner? She definitely needs/wants/ does best with manipulatives. We have time to the hour down, and addition with single digits. She knows 2d & 3d shapes, has started with measurement. Subtraction still confuses her somewhat and she defintiely needs visual/physical clues with that - she LOVES the Subtracting Sardines app on her iPad. 

Science - We still have ALL of the Magic School Bus kits we ordered for last year, from Hmeschool Buyers Co-Op. we will try to use those this year. She loves science and last year we studied states of matter, volcanoes, all kinds of animals and habitats, raised monarch caterpillars (life cycles), grew crystals, and we watch LOTS of Wild Kratts, Magic School Bus on Netflix, etc.

Social Studies & History - We studied about Ancient Egypt, talked about the pilgrims, learned about maps and places/community helpers. We were pretty lax on that last year, just doing things that caught her fancy during the year. Any ideas on a better focus - or curriculum that would be good for next year?

PE - We just use park days, play time with friends, exercise videos on YouTube, she LOVES the Mr. Mark ones and I may either order some DVD's or find a way to pay for a year of streaming for that. But she is a VERY physical child so I never worry about that!

Art - She loves doing art, and I haven't done anything formal with art styles or art history. We might start this year.Any thoughts on what would be good for that?

Music - Nothing formal here yet either - we just listen to a HUGE variety of music - classical during school time, and almost everything else other times, as well as classical. She knows her instruments and their "family" already though.

Thank you for any and all helpful suggestions!!!


by on Jul. 30, 2014 at 1:08 PM
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No_Difference
by Silver Member on Jul. 30, 2014 at 1:53 PM

Math: Look into Math U See. It's all hands on with manipulatives, and I'd probably start out with the Alpha book still if subtraction still is tricky. Even if she flies through the rest of the book. It's all mastery based too. 

Reading: I know you're looking for something probably cheaper than this, but we have had great success with All About Reading. It also is partly hands on, and encourages more than just reading the little bits that is in there or the short stories. It breaks it down nicely. There are fluency practice pages with just about every lesson I think (I haven't looked at it in awhile since we're not starting til the end of August). It goes over the why's (why this letter is going to say this instead of the other way), points out the rule breakers, and it is also mastery based.  

If you don't care that something is common core aligned...check out See Time Fly series by Gander Publishing for History. It only has a few sentences to read a day, and then 5 questions about the little that was read. There is a workbook that is optional. The chapters are "flights" so in the workbook, there is a pre-flight lesson for each day of the flight, which goes over vocab, and then after the whole flight is over, there is a post flight that goes over what happened during the week. It's less on reading, which may be helpful. My struggling reader hated Story of the World for history because it was too reading intensive for her, but otherwise it was a really good program too...  

mommy2kaelynn
by Member on Jul. 30, 2014 at 2:13 PM

Thank you so much. I had been considering Math U See - but was conflicted between it and Math Mammoth (I think that was the other one anyway!) I will look into it again!

I will see if we can save up for All About Reading - any thoughts on what to do until I can afford to get that?

I am not worried about Common Core (unless she suddenly decides she wants to go back to PS) So I will certainly look into the See Time Fly series. She really gets focused on one or two time periods each year and I kind of just dive in with both feet and go really in depth. 

Thank you for your wonderful ideas!

romacox
by Silver Member on Jul. 30, 2014 at 4:14 PM

Besides my home school experience, I also tutor children (K through 6) that have difficulty reading.  I have discovered that 9 times out of ten it is very easy to solve, and is explained in this video.  It does not effect all children, but it does many children. 


Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Jul. 30, 2014 at 6:05 PM
My son has a language disorder and we used Reading Eggs which he finished last spring and he's using Reading Kingdom now which is good. BTW once he started reading his speech improved a lot.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Jul. 30, 2014 at 8:44 PM

Starfall.com has free stuff, and they have a pretty cheap app that my little guy likes http://www.starfall.com/n/N-info/download.htm

Work on individual letter sounds, and then start working on vowel teams and consonant blends and breaking apart sylables in words. Before I was able to get AAR, I looked at the scope and sequence and was able to make up my own word list of words to work on each week based how they broke things down, and then made my own phrases or sentences up for him to work on. It gave me at least a good starting point. I used Starfall with AAR because my little guy gets bored very very quickly with things and I have to change it up a bit.

I haven't used Math Mammoth, so I can't really compare, but we have just loved Math U See.

See Time Fly doesn't go into just one or two areas per se, it in general goes over time periods, so it would breifly go over the ancient egyptians, and then move into the greeks and romans, etc. The first book goes from 40,000 BC to AD 1450. not sure wher your stance on religion/secular falls, but it does take on more of the evolution apraoch, but doesn't specifically go over evolution or creation or anything. It starts with "prehistory"  and Neanderthal Man 200,000 years ago.  It also doesn't really go into any "important people" it really is just a very general overview, but it's light on reading, and could make a really good spring board into deeper "investigation". 

Quoting mommy2kaelynn:

Thank you so much. I had been considering Math U See - but was conflicted between it and Math Mammoth (I think that was the other one anyway!) I will look into it again!

I will see if we can save up for All About Reading - any thoughts on what to do until I can afford to get that?

I am not worried about Common Core (unless she suddenly decides she wants to go back to PS) So I will certainly look into the See Time Fly series. She really gets focused on one or two time periods each year and I kind of just dive in with both feet and go really in depth. 

Thank you for your wonderful ideas!


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mommy2kaelynn
by Member on Jul. 31, 2014 at 1:13 AM

She actually is beginning to read and has quite a few sight words down. Her problem is actually much more related to fear of failure and an unwillingness to try to blend words together. She CAN do it, she just won't if she thinks she will get it wrong.

She received services for her speech delay for about 2 years when she was much younger, but "graduated" once she did not have a significant enough delay to qualify for state services. Her speech is actually very, very good and her comprehension is AMAZING! I did the DORA with her at the end of the schol year in May and she had the comprehension level of a 5th-6th grader.  Her receptive skills are awesome, she is just too afraid to make a final leap!

We have used the free Starfall website for years. We were recommended to it by her speech therapist when she was about 2 years old. 

Math U See sounds really wonderful, and I plan to give her the placement test this week, as well as All About Reading for later. 

See Time Fly seems perfect for us - a jumping off point for each "flight" to go more in depth if she wishes, and just move on but know we covered it, if she doesn't seem interested. 

Anyway - any other ideas are more than welcome and thanks so much for all the thoughts and ideas so far!

Scribbleprints
by Member on Jul. 31, 2014 at 5:13 AM

I can sure relate to this.   My son is a little younger (he's 6--would have been going into first grade or repeating Kindergarten) but at just the same stage as your daughter (and same thing...has a big fear about reading--We're doing Bob books too and it takes me forever just to get him started but once he starts he does just fine.  It's just getting him to try that's the hard part.   This is why I'm pulling him out of KG and homeschooling this year.

While I don't have a suggestion for you since I'm looking for one myself.  However, you might consider a curriculum for Waldorf.  I've really only looked at a couple of these and not any specifically for reading, but I do know that they usually don't start reading until age 7, and that in Waldorf schools (there's a lot in England) they found that kids in these schools, even though they started later, were  as far ahead as kids who started earlier in other programs.  So I'm thinking these might be more lined up to where your daugther is.    They also seem to have a really gentle, non-threatening, fun approach...the ones I looked at couched the learning in a fairy tale story.  

Also, one thing that helped us a little with the "getting it wrong" fear is that we talked with our kiddo about how when he learned to walk that he would take a step, then fall, then take another, then fall, and then maybe take two, then fall (we used little walking hands to show this--which made him laught).   We told him that falling (making mistakes) was something that was not bad but necessary.     It needed to happen for him to learn.  So when he misses a word and gets discouraged/shut-down by that sometimes we'll remind him "It's ok...remember, you gotta fall a lot before you can walk.  Everybody does."  

Meet the Robinson's might be a good motivational movie (it's theme is "Keep Moving Forward" and how "failure" should be celebrated because it's what leads to success in the end).   I really should watch that again with him...he's seen it, but not since working on reading.  Hmmm. 

Quote:

She actually is beginning to read and has quite a few sight words down. Her problem is actually much more related to fear of failure and an unwillingness to try to blend words together. She CAN do it, she just won't if she thinks she will get it wrong.


No_Difference
by Silver Member on Jul. 31, 2014 at 7:50 AM

Thats where I think AAR could still help. By learning where to break apart words into syllables and how they practice the blends... 
Basically, it's like each blend gets a flash card that goes over all the different sounds it could make. so CH for instance has /ch/ like in child, /k/ like in school, /sh/ life in chef. And then for practicing blending words together, you can write out the word, and put something, like a penny, underneath each letter, or each blend, and then pull down the penny as you're saying that sound. So chip would have a penny under the ch, the i, and the p, and it would be sounded out ch-i-p. and then you blend it faster and faster outloud until you'd say the word chip.  (Does that make sense?) And it goes on to bigger and bigger words, including compound words, etc.  
Have you seen the You Read to Me I read to You books? That way she can work on practicing reading, and you read with her, and they have parts where you both read together? That might build up confidence too.
I should note too, my little guy is just moving onto the Level 2 for reading. I think starfall really only parallells level 1, so that was my bad, sorry.  

Quoting mommy2kaelynn:

She actually is beginning to read and has quite a few sight words down. Her problem is actually much more related to fear of failure and an unwillingness to try to blend words together. She CAN do it, she just won't if she thinks she will get it wrong.

She received services for her speech delay for about 2 years when she was much younger, but "graduated" once she did not have a significant enough delay to qualify for state services. Her speech is actually very, very good and her comprehension is AMAZING! I did the DORA with her at the end of the schol year in May and she had the comprehension level of a 5th-6th grader.  Her receptive skills are awesome, she is just too afraid to make a final leap!

We have used the free Starfall website for years. We were recommended to it by her speech therapist when she was about 2 years old. 

Math U See sounds really wonderful, and I plan to give her the placement test this week, as well as All About Reading for later. 

See Time Fly seems perfect for us - a jumping off point for each "flight" to go more in depth if she wishes, and just move on but know we covered it, if she doesn't seem interested. 

Anyway - any other ideas are more than welcome and thanks so much for all the thoughts and ideas so far!


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mommy2kaelynn
by Member on Jul. 31, 2014 at 11:53 AM
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Thanks everyone - 

Scribbleprints - Funny enough, I had a double major in college - half was early childhood education, and I was trained in Reggio Emilio, Waldorf, and Montessori at each type of school that I worked in. My daughter's preschool was a combo of all three styles in one - it was phenomenal! If we'd had a similar wonderful experience with the school when she transitioned to K, we would never have started homeschooling! Not sure I am ready for her to see Meet the Robinson's yet, she was adopted, and the adoption context in that movie are a bit rough for a young kid. But I do love the thought of teaching her that failing is ok - we do try to work on that with her - in every aspect of school and life, but she, much like me, is STUBBORN, and does not want to accept our "words of wisdom" - but we will keep working on it!!! Whcih Waldorf curriculum are you looking at?

No-Difference - I am definitely interested in AAR - I think after I do the testing they recommend, my Mom might help us out with paying for it! YAY! We love the You Read, I Read books - we found one by accident last summer at the library and she loved it so much I bought a copy! We have 3 or 4 now. I am just sad that I have only been able to find one specific K level - most we have and kind find are K-1, which last summer were too hard for her, but the K one is perfect. I need to go look again. Thanks for the reminder! 

She did well yesterday with Reading Eggs - the lesson was mostly about EN, ING and EG endings. She did very well, other than being somewhat distracted, So...one step forward and one step back...glad she isn't in PS and facing the pressure from peers and teachers, and school districts though!

Memere60
by Member on Aug. 1, 2014 at 12:57 PM

I used Sing, Spell, Read, and Write with my daughter. She had some delays in reading, but this program helped a lot. It comes with 17 readers. See if you can find a way to review it before you buy it. I had other homeschool friends who used this program on their kids. One is a doctor, one is a professor, one is a nurse, and my daughter became a teacher!! No matter what profession your daughter chooses in life, this should make a good reader out of her. Good luck!! P.S. My daughter was a preemie, so I worried that she would be a poor reader, but patience and perseverance really paid off.

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