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4-H book as a subject??

Posted by on Aug. 5, 2014 at 9:12 AM
  • 9 Replies

My daughter just showed her rabbit for 4H yesterday and did really really well. She is all excited, and ended up winning 3rd for overall show champion (shocked the heck out of me!) and she won 1st in novice class for showing. Because of all this, she really wants to learn more about rabbits, and not just on her own. She is doing the rabbit book for 4H again next year, and when we get back from our month long travel, I have every intention of going to the library and getting her a bunch of books on rabbits. She knows all she needs to know about HER rabbit, but the judge had them switch rabbits while they were up there and talk about another person's rabbit - color, breed, and best/worst qualities of the rabbit. So I guess we're off to learn more about all rabbits??? 

 It got me thinking though. The rabbits in and of itself isn't going to be a "subject" per se, but we are going to devout a lot of time into studying the rabbits, and it would work perfect as a "side activity" with biology. I plan on having both kids do it since my little guy wants to show rabbits when he's old enough now too...at least for now anyway, it may change by the time he's 9...  But what about other books? Would it be easy enough to turn them into a subject with some of the other books (we didn't do many this year so I'm still not familiar with how all of 4H works).  I know she wants to do something with textiles next year after seeing the dresses on display, and for a self determined project she is collecting the wool off her rabbit: showing how to collect the wool, how to clean it (if necessary) and card it, and how to spin it on a drop spindle, and possibly on a wheel (if we can find one to borrow), and then how to either knit or crochet with it (her choice). That in and of itself seems like it is going to be a lengthy...but again, not sure if it is "subject" worthy. 

Any ideas of how we can turn this into more of like a subject? This way, it will be more justified in hubby's mind that we devout a portion of the day to working on it each day, instead of just leaving it up to her to do on her own, like he expected her to do this year with her books (and it failed miserably on a few of them...)

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by on Aug. 5, 2014 at 9:12 AM
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Replies (1-9):
Leissaintexas
by Bronze Member on Aug. 5, 2014 at 10:13 AM
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Can it not be its own subject? Its value doesn't have to be academic for it to have value. Its very rich in life skills, confidence-enhancing, networking, public speaking, creating well rounded individuals. That's the justification.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Aug. 5, 2014 at 10:21 AM

I guess hubby just wants there to be an academic aspect to it, and I've tried arguing that she is technically learnign a new skill just as much as an art class (which he deems as a waste of time) or a shop class (which he feels is an important life skill...see that flip side??).  It drives me batty, but there are some battles worht fighting and some that aren't...this one sadly is one that is just easier to try and add to it to make more "acadmeic like" to appease him...  I'm also battling against his PTSD, OCD, and the irrational arguments that come with it all. 
It's probably why I come on here with a lot of very menial and pointless questions to many...  

Quoting Leissaintexas: Can it not be its own subject? Its value doesn't have to be academic for it to have value. Its very rich in life skills, confidence-enhancing, networking, public speaking, creating well rounded individuals. That's the justification.


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Bobcatridge
by Member on Aug. 6, 2014 at 1:22 PM
My 13 yr old daughter is in a 4H rabbit project. There are a series of small thin books you can get through 4H that cover rabbits that go from novice level up. I am assuming you also have The Standards of Perfection book from ARBA - a great reference on all rabbits. There is also rabbit level testing that your daughter can do to demonstrate her rabbit knowledge and get several 4H pens for her hat. You could study the rabbit books and possibly use the level testing as a demonstration of skill. Good luck - we like the 4H rabbit project.
ShaMac
by New Member on Aug. 6, 2014 at 1:54 PM
http://www.4-h.org/resource-library/curriculum/


Her project sounds like science, history, and art, and social science. What fun.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Aug. 6, 2014 at 8:30 PM

I did not know that site even existed...THANK YOU!! 
(can you tell we're totally new to the world of 4H...our group is relatively new too, so not much information was passed around)  

Quoting ShaMac: http://www.4-h.org/resource-library/curriculum/ Her project sounds like science, history, and art, and social science. What fun.


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No_Difference
by Silver Member on Aug. 6, 2014 at 8:38 PM

We do have the What's Hoppening book. She finished year 1 in it this year...technically more...but we only counted year one finished. She already started working on year 2.

We were never told about the Standards of Perfection book, but I will definitely look into getting it now.

Jamie wow'ed the judge completely with this being her first year. She did do showmanship and did well too. The judge asked her almost all the colors of the rabbits after the show was over, and she got most of them correct, and the only reason he did it was because her rabbit is "blue tort" or something like that, and he was amazed she knew. Every question he asked about Angora's she nailed it. We definitely need to work on her other rabbit knowledge...that was her downfall in showmanship.

I am going to sound proably really stupid, but we are very new to 4H (finishing our 1st year) and our group is relatively new and very small, and not much information was ever given about anything....What is the hat and pins? And would I find the testing on the 4H.org page too?
I think I'm definitely going to get the helper's guide book for next year though! :)  


Quoting Bobcatridge: My 13 yr old daughter is in a 4H rabbit project. There are a series of small thin books you can get through 4H that cover rabbits that go from novice level up. I am assuming you also have The Standards of Perfection book from ARBA - a great reference on all rabbits. There is also rabbit level testing that your daughter can do to demonstrate her rabbit knowledge and get several 4H pens for her hat. You could study the rabbit books and possibly use the level testing as a demonstration of skill. Good luck - we like the 4H rabbit project.


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Bobcatridge
by Member on Aug. 6, 2014 at 9:18 PM
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It is great your daughter did so well her first year - really impressive. We are in a rural 4H group - only about 30 kids but we have contacts with other rural groups. For us the rabbit group is really great for social interaction. 4H kids usually wear whites and a green hat for competitions and they get pins for years in 4H, attendance, winning competitions, etc. When they get to high school they switch to white hats. It is so good for the kids. My daughter has worked with small rabbits and did really well. Last summer she wanted this rabbit that is relatively rare on the west coast. Well, he is a spirited young 9lb buck - a bit harder to work with than a 5 lb rabbitt. Anyway he bit her during the last showmanship competition. She did enter him in fur and breed in the fair and he won 2nd in colored other breed and 5th in fur - the judge oozed over him but he was the only one of his breed. So now she wants to do showmanship with the rabbit and breed him. She is on the autism spectrum so all this is a big deal for her.
Bobcatridge
by Member on Aug. 7, 2014 at 12:50 PM
Level testing varies depending on county. For our county there are specific testing days. In our 4H group there are specific projects such as rabbit, pig, beef, goat, sheep. I think there were only 3 kids in the rabbit project but we met and helped the kids prepare and learn. Our goat group only had 2 kids and there were 3 in the beef group.
No_Difference
by Silver Member on Aug. 19, 2014 at 11:37 PM
That is awesome with your daughter :) I sincerely wish her the best of luck! Cherokee, my daughter's rabbit is 8 lbs, or is supposed to be, I think, so I understand the difficulty level involves in handling!

(Sorry it took so long to respond back, we've been on vacation)


Quoting Bobcatridge: It is great your daughter did so well her first year - really impressive. We are in a rural 4H group - only about 30 kids but we have contacts with other rural groups. For us the rabbit group is really great for social interaction.

4H kids usually wear whites and a green hat for competitions and they get pins for years in 4H, attendance, winning competitions, etc. When they get to high school they switch to white hats. It is so good for the kids. My daughter has worked with small rabbits and did really well. Last summer she wanted this rabbit that is relatively rare on the west coast. Well, he is a spirited young 9lb buck - a bit harder to work with than a 5 lb rabbitt. Anyway he bit her during the last showmanship competition. She did enter him in fur and breed in the fair and he won 2nd in colored other breed and 5th in fur - the judge oozed over him but he was the only one of his breed. So now she wants to do showmanship with the rabbit and breed him. She is on the autism spectrum so all this is a big deal for her.
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