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Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Spanish for Elementary Kids?

Do any of you teach Spanish or another foreign language at the elementary level?  We would really like to include Spanish in our homeschooling for a number of reasons.  One is that DH is fluent in it and some of his family still only speaks Spanish.  He can't really teach it to them(besides talking to them in it more frequently which he needs to do) because he never learned it in school, just in life so he doesn't really know all the proper things to teach.  I took 4 years in high school and 2 years of it in college so I am okay at it but I would really like to find an easy(and hopefully fun!) curriculum to do for it.  My kids are 8, 7 and 3 if that helps.  Thanks!

by on Aug. 12, 2014 at 7:29 PM
Replies (11-17):
sweetserenit292
by Member on Aug. 14, 2014 at 2:30 PM

I was looking into Little Pim  because the Homeschoolbuyers co-op is having a sale.   But, I haven't tried it yet.  I do have some primer 1st -3rd grade workbooks  that I may start this year.  The hardest thing that I find is that the Spanish vocabulary differs slightly according to the program.  I bought Muzzy off ebay about 6 yrs ago.  Although some things were the same, many phrases differed slighty.  This created an issue becuase my husband would always say that isn't the right way to say that phrase.   The only program that is really good, is Rosetta Stone but I personally wouldn't use it until maybe 5th grade. 

mommy2cristian
by Member on Aug. 14, 2014 at 6:33 PM

I'm responding so I'll have this page.

OP, I'm not sure why your husband and the father of my kids find it so difficult to teach Spanish.  Their parents didn't teach it to them the way it's taught in school.  Just speak it.  It sounds like your DH may be a cousin of my DB.  Lol.  He thinks that he has to explain everything.  If it's all you say to them they'll figure it out when there's no English translation forthcoming. :)  Plus, the above poster is right in regards to the translations, which is why they're the best teachers for our kids.  For example, DB doesn't use "helado" for "ice cream."  He uses "pasteles" which would mean pastry.  He knows "helado" but they don't use it.  They say "vaso" for glass/cup instead of "copa."  When I talk to my kids I teach them the way I was taught in school, which is more formal than used in regular conversations.  

countrygirlkat
by Member on Aug. 17, 2014 at 3:10 PM
It can be hard with different phrasing and ways to say things for sure. Thanks for the thoughts!
Quoting sweetserenit292:

I was looking into Little Pim  because the Homeschoolbuyers co-op is having a sale.   But, I haven't tried it yet.  I do have some primer 1st -3rd grade workbooks  that I may start this year.  The hardest thing that I find is that the Spanish vocabulary differs slightly according to the program.  I bought Muzzy off ebay about 6 yrs ago.  Although some things were the same, many phrases differed slighty.  This created an issue becuase my husband would always say that isn't the right way to say that phrase.   The only program that is really good, is Rosetta Stone but I personally wouldn't use it until maybe 5th grade. 

countrygirlkat
by Member on Aug. 17, 2014 at 3:16 PM


I guess I worded that wrong in my post. DH can and does speak to them in Spanish and teaches them words here and there and plans to do it more frequently, we just forget sometimes.  We just would like to have a formal way to teach them as well as our goal isn't for them just to be able to use conversational Spanish like DH can but to hav them be able to read it and write in it so that they can use it for more then conversation.  We live in Texas and to have the truely fluent in not just conversation but in reading and writing properly will be a huge asset to them. 

Quoting mommy2cristian:

I'm responding so I'll have this page.

OP, I'm not sure why your husband and the father of my kids find it so difficult to teach Spanish.  Their parents didn't teach it to them the way it's taught in school.  Just speak it.  It sounds like your DH may be a cousin of my DB.  Lol.  He thinks that he has to explain everything.  If it's all you say to them they'll figure it out when there's no English translation forthcoming. :)  Plus, the above poster is right in regards to the translations, which is why they're the best teachers for our kids.  For example, DB doesn't use "helado" for "ice cream."  He uses "pasteles" which would mean pastry.  He knows "helado" but they don't use it.  They say "vaso" for glass/cup instead of "copa."  When I talk to my kids I teach them the way I was taught in school, which is more formal than used in regular conversations.  


mommy2cristian
by Member on Aug. 17, 2014 at 5:20 PM
1 mom liked this
Gotcha. We live in CA and I don't understand why DB doesn't get how valuable it is. His cousins are the same way. They say they forget to speak Spanish and sometimes don't even realize they're not speaking in Spanish.

Quoting countrygirlkat:

I guess I worded that wrong in my post. DH can and does speak to them in Spanish and teaches them words here and there and plans to do it more frequently, we just forget sometimes.  We just would like to have a formal way to teach them as well as our goal isn't for them just to be able to use conversational Spanish like DH can but to hav them be able to read it and write in it so that they can use it for more then conversation.  We live in Texas and to have the truely fluent in not just conversation but in reading and writing properly will be a huge asset to them. 

Quoting mommy2cristian:

I'm responding so I'll have this page.

OP, I'm not sure why your husband and the father of my kids find it so difficult to teach Spanish.  Their parents didn't teach it to them the way it's taught in school.  Just speak it.  It sounds like your DH may be a cousin of my DB.  Lol.  He thinks that he has to explain everything.  If it's all you say to them they'll figure it out when there's no English translation forthcoming. :)  Plus, the above poster is right in regards to the translations, which is why they're the best teachers for our kids.  For example, DB doesn't use "helado" for "ice cream."  He uses "pasteles" which would mean pastry.  He knows "helado" but they don't use it.  They say "vaso" for glass/cup instead of "copa."  When I talk to my kids I teach them the way I was taught in school, which is more formal than used in regular conversations.  

countrygirlkat
by Member on Aug. 17, 2014 at 10:47 PM


A lot of DH's cousins are the same way. Many of them don't speak Spanish at all or barely any even though their grandparents didn't speak Engish they never bothered to learn to speak Spanish even though they could have.  DH at least can speak it fluently which is huge and he still knows and teaches our kids a lot of the culture which is wonderful. 

Quoting mommy2cristian: Gotcha. We live in CA and I don't understand why DB doesn't get how valuable it is. His cousins are the same way. They say they forget to speak Spanish and sometimes don't even realize they're not speaking in Spanish.
Quoting countrygirlkat:

I guess I worded that wrong in my post. DH can and does speak to them in Spanish and teaches them words here and there and plans to do it more frequently, we just forget sometimes.  We just would like to have a formal way to teach them as well as our goal isn't for them just to be able to use conversational Spanish like DH can but to hav them be able to read it and write in it so that they can use it for more then conversation.  We live in Texas and to have the truely fluent in not just conversation but in reading and writing properly will be a huge asset to them. 

Quoting mommy2cristian:

I'm responding so I'll have this page.

OP, I'm not sure why your husband and the father of my kids find it so difficult to teach Spanish.  Their parents didn't teach it to them the way it's taught in school.  Just speak it.  It sounds like your DH may be a cousin of my DB.  Lol.  He thinks that he has to explain everything.  If it's all you say to them they'll figure it out when there's no English translation forthcoming. :)  Plus, the above poster is right in regards to the translations, which is why they're the best teachers for our kids.  For example, DB doesn't use "helado" for "ice cream."  He uses "pasteles" which would mean pastry.  He knows "helado" but they don't use it.  They say "vaso" for glass/cup instead of "copa."  When I talk to my kids I teach them the way I was taught in school, which is more formal than used in regular conversations.  


mommy2cristian
by Member on Aug. 18, 2014 at 2:37 PM
1 mom liked this
I know, right? Db's cousins speak Spanish and all his uncles and aunts speak Spanish, but only one of his cousin's has kids that speak Spanish. All of the older generation only can say hello in English. Speaking Spanish here is a huge advantage. But I get you because a lot of them can't read or write. Db can read it but not write it. If you know most of the basics you can figure out how to write. I'm better at understanding it and my sister is better at speaking it.

With Duolingo my kids got it and found it easy to match pictures. It's simple but not enough. And Little Pim they didn't find it interesting.

Quoting countrygirlkat:

A lot of DH's cousins are the same way. Many of them don't speak Spanish at all or barely any even though their grandparents didn't speak Engish they never bothered to learn to speak Spanish even though they could have.  DH at least can speak it fluently which is huge and he still knows and teaches our kids a lot of the culture which is wonderful. 

Quoting mommy2cristian: Gotcha. We live in CA and I don't understand why DB doesn't get how valuable it is. His cousins are the same way. They say they forget to speak Spanish and sometimes don't even realize they're not speaking in Spanish.

Quoting countrygirlkat:

I guess I worded that wrong in my post. DH can and does speak to them in Spanish and teaches them words here and there and plans to do it more frequently, we just forget sometimes.  We just would like to have a formal way to teach them as well as our goal isn't for them just to be able to use conversational Spanish like DH can but to hav them be able to read it and write in it so that they can use it for more then conversation.  We live in Texas and to have the truely fluent in not just conversation but in reading and writing properly will be a huge asset to them. 

Quoting mommy2cristian:

I'm responding so I'll have this page.

OP, I'm not sure why your husband and the father of my kids find it so difficult to teach Spanish.  Their parents didn't teach it to them the way it's taught in school.  Just speak it.  It sounds like your DH may be a cousin of my DB.  Lol.  He thinks that he has to explain everything.  If it's all you say to them they'll figure it out when there's no English translation forthcoming. :)  Plus, the above poster is right in regards to the translations, which is why they're the best teachers for our kids.  For example, DB doesn't use "helado" for "ice cream."  He uses "pasteles" which would mean pastry.  He knows "helado" but they don't use it.  They say "vaso" for glass/cup instead of "copa."  When I talk to my kids I teach them the way I was taught in school, which is more formal than used in regular conversations.  

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