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What do YOU know about ...

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... all things August?

What one word would you use to describe the month if August?

I'll start ...

8th month
by on Aug. 19, 2014 at 6:01 PM
Replies (41-49):
elizabooks
by Member on Aug. 27, 2014 at 5:44 PM
1 mom liked this


Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.


Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?
Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 28, 2014 at 9:40 PM
Do you cook with any of these? And how do you celebrate? It sounds interesting.

Quoting elizabooks:

Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.

Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?

Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.

elizabooks
by Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 9:03 AM
1 mom liked this

Yep I cook with all of those. :)

Second Harvest is a holiday that I have only seen celebrated in our small village. We took the traditions when we left (my great greats) and have done modified versions over the years. But since we have all become more urban, it has become more difficult to do.

First off this is a non cooking holiday. So all meals we eat over the next three to five days is leftovers. The kids make corn dollies out of the husks of the summer corn to use for the competitions later (for Hallows eve celebrations), and also toasted honey corn from the damaged corn to be hung for the deer and rabbitsin the winter. 

If you worked you took vacation days, and school started the week after.

You wear your worst clothes, so if they tear or wear out they can be used in the winter to be torn into shreds for the stuffing of the dog begs or into cleaning rags.

The men are assigned to a woman for the day. He is at her beck and call, her beast of burden from sun up to sundown.. The women would harvest the crops, prep all of the food, start the baking/preserving, have the men start moving the mulch pits, turning the gardens (all of the back breaking work) and doing winter prep work on the house(gathering wood to split, putting the storm windows in). The last year's winner will sample the  fruits and berries and determine who would be incharge of making the wine/beer and jellies. Each day would have a riddle contest (the Saint Ives one was considered simple) and stories were told. (anything goes: my dad once told us the story of Battle Star Galaticia and set it in Ancient Greece. Man I wish I had recorded that.) If you could sing you sang songs, played and instrument you played. And everyone would critique your performace .

it was a fun family time.

Quoting kirbymom: Do you cook with any of these? And how do you celebrate? It sounds interesting.
Quoting elizabooks:


Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.


Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?
Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.



kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 29, 2014 at 11:04 PM
Wow. Did/do you guys actively celebrate these harvests every year?

Quoting elizabooks:

Yep I cook with all of those. :)

Second Harvest is a holiday that I have only seen celebrated in our small village. We took the traditions when we left (my great greats) and have done modified versions over the years. But since we have all become more urban, it has become more difficult to do.

First off this is a non cooking holiday. So all meals we eat over the next three to five days is leftovers. The kids make corn dollies out of the husks of the summer corn to use for the competitions later (for Hallows eve celebrations), and also toasted honey corn from the damaged corn to be hung for the deer and rabbitsin the winter. 

If you worked you took vacation days, and school started the week after.

You wear your worst clothes, so if they tear or wear out they can be used in the winter to be torn into shreds for the stuffing of the dog begs or into cleaning rags.

The men are assigned to a woman for the day. He is at her beck and call, her beast of burden from sun up to sundown.. The women would harvest the crops, prep all of the food, start the baking/preserving, have the men start moving the mulch pits, turning the gardens (all of the back breaking work) and doing winter prep work on the house(gathering wood to split, putting the storm windows in). The last year's winner will sample the  fruits and berries and determine who would be incharge of making the wine/beer and jellies. Each day would have a riddle contest (the Saint Ives one was considered simple) and stories were told. (anything goes: my dad once told us the story of Battle Star Galaticia and set it in Ancient Greece. Man I wish I had recorded that.) If you could sing you sang songs, played and instrument you played. And everyone would critique your performace .

it was a fun family time.

Quoting kirbymom: Do you cook with any of these? And how do you celebrate? It sounds interesting.

Quoting elizabooks:

Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.

Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?

Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.

MamaLauri
by Member on Aug. 30, 2014 at 8:23 AM
1 mom liked this

Lots of babies are born. Nine months after the cold holiday season. Thanksgiving through New Years.

elizabooks
by Member on Aug. 30, 2014 at 10:20 AM
1 mom liked this


To some extent we still do. Most of the family is either 70+ or in other states, so my dd doesn't get the full effect. 


Quoting kirbymom: Wow. Did/do you guys actively celebrate these harvests every year?
Quoting elizabooks:

Yep I cook with all of those. :)

Second Harvest is a holiday that I have only seen celebrated in our small village. We took the traditions when we left (my great greats) and have done modified versions over the years. But since we have all become more urban, it has become more difficult to do.

First off this is a non cooking holiday. So all meals we eat over the next three to five days is leftovers. The kids make corn dollies out of the husks of the summer corn to use for the competitions later (for Hallows eve celebrations), and also toasted honey corn from the damaged corn to be hung for the deer and rabbitsin the winter. 

If you worked you took vacation days, and school started the week after.

You wear your worst clothes, so if they tear or wear out they can be used in the winter to be torn into shreds for the stuffing of the dog begs or into cleaning rags.

The men are assigned to a woman for the day. He is at her beck and call, her beast of burden from sun up to sundown.. The women would harvest the crops, prep all of the food, start the baking/preserving, have the men start moving the mulch pits, turning the gardens (all of the back breaking work) and doing winter prep work on the house(gathering wood to split, putting the storm windows in). The last year's winner will sample the  fruits and berries and determine who would be incharge of making the wine/beer and jellies. Each day would have a riddle contest (the Saint Ives one was considered simple) and stories were told. (anything goes: my dad once told us the story of Battle Star Galaticia and set it in Ancient Greece. Man I wish I had recorded that.) If you could sing you sang songs, played and instrument you played. And everyone would critique your performace .

it was a fun family time.

Quoting kirbymom: Do you cook with any of these? And how do you celebrate? It sounds interesting.
Quoting elizabooks:


Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.


Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?
Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.




kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 30, 2014 at 12:35 PM
Ahahahaha LMAO! That is funny. Funny, but So true! Lol :)

Quoting MamaLauri:

Lots of babies are born. Nine months after the cold holiday season. Thanksgiving through New Years.

kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 30, 2014 at 12:39 PM
Aww. So somewhat of a lost family tradition. Maybe you can put together a portfolio of this with written stories and photos so that she can sort of experience it herself through the stories and pictures. Maybe even do a small personal celebration just to give her her own experience, maybe?

Quoting elizabooks:

To some extent we still do. Most of the family is either 70+ or in other states, so my dd doesn't get the full effect. 

Quoting kirbymom: Wow. Did/do you guys actively celebrate these harvests every year?

Quoting elizabooks:

Yep I cook with all of those. :)

Second Harvest is a holiday that I have only seen celebrated in our small village. We took the traditions when we left (my great greats) and have done modified versions over the years. But since we have all become more urban, it has become more difficult to do.

First off this is a non cooking holiday. So all meals we eat over the next three to five days is leftovers. The kids make corn dollies out of the husks of the summer corn to use for the competitions later (for Hallows eve celebrations), and also toasted honey corn from the damaged corn to be hung for the deer and rabbitsin the winter. 

If you worked you took vacation days, and school started the week after.

You wear your worst clothes, so if they tear or wear out they can be used in the winter to be torn into shreds for the stuffing of the dog begs or into cleaning rags.

The men are assigned to a woman for the day. He is at her beck and call, her beast of burden from sun up to sundown.. The women would harvest the crops, prep all of the food, start the baking/preserving, have the men start moving the mulch pits, turning the gardens (all of the back breaking work) and doing winter prep work on the house(gathering wood to split, putting the storm windows in). The last year's winner will sample the  fruits and berries and determine who would be incharge of making the wine/beer and jellies. Each day would have a riddle contest (the Saint Ives one was considered simple) and stories were told. (anything goes: my dad once told us the story of Battle Star Galaticia and set it in Ancient Greece. Man I wish I had recorded that.) If you could sing you sang songs, played and instrument you played. And everyone would critique your performace .

it was a fun family time.

Quoting kirbymom: Do you cook with any of these? And how do you celebrate? It sounds interesting.

Quoting elizabooks:

Second Harvest is a festival day. but for the harvest this month is: the last of the summer squashes, melons, lettuce, crab apples, basil, thyme and onions.  Concord grapes, watercress and summer pears are at the end as well.  Next month is the last of the beets, carrots/turnips, radishes and sunflowers.  All other grapes are picked as well.

Not that I grow all of this, my yard iss very small and not the best quality of soil, but I can still grow most of it.

Quoting kirbymom: What do you harvest in your second harvest crops?

Quoting elizabooks: Second harvest.

Scribbleprints
by Member on Sep. 3, 2014 at 11:28 PM

Ok, here's a few.  A lot of them also use cucumbers.

Cucmber Mint Water

Chop some cucumber (at least 4 or 5 slices, though more is fine), and add at least a couple stalks of fresh mint to a pitcher of ice water.  The longer you let it sit before drinking, the more flavor it will have (you can keep adding ice and more water to it all day if you want to have it all day).  

Mint Cucumber Salad:

Chop a few large leaves (or a bunch of small leaves) mint, chop up one cucumber, chop up one small onion (or half of a larger one), put them all in a bowl, sprinkle with lemon peper (or salt and pepper if you don't have that), and pour vinegar over them (about a cup or so).  Mix it all up.  Serve and eat immediately.  (Some recipes say add a tsp of sugar and honey...I don't, cuase I like tart).

Dill Creamy Cucumber Salad:

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/259097784784901023/


Dilly Chicken Sandwhich

(this one can be done with dried dill too but it would taste awesome with fresh, especially the spread).

Flatten two chicken breasts with a mallet (or you can slice them in two thinner pieces, or both).  Mince 1-2 cloves garlic,  add to fry pan with butter and sprinkle with dill (dried...haven't tried fresh with that yet), and fry until done  (Make sure to sprinkle the other side with dill when you turn it too).

Toast bread (sourdough is the best for this, but other kinds work too).  Take a little of the left over butter from the pan and spread it on the bread (you can do that before you toast it if you use a toaster over...makes a nice texture).  Then spread one side with the sandwhich spread below, put the chicken on it, and serve.

Dilly Sandwhich Spread

2 TBS sourcream, several squeezes from a lemon or lime (to taste), and dill, fresh or dry (at least a tsp...but again, to taste).  Mix it all up.  Spread on sandwhiches or whatever.  

---

I had three of these together tonight--they compliment each other so well.  Reminded me that I hadn't answered this yet.  I was going to come back and do that when I had time.  

Quoting kirbymom: Wow. That is awesome. Okay, you got me. What 'fun' things can you do with dill and mint? :)
Quoting Scribbleprints:

Not all, but  I grow a lot.  So far oregano, rosemary, chives, cilantro (in winter/spring - it bolts as soon as it gets warm), dill (spring/fall), parsley, mint.  There's some fun things you can do with dill and mint fresh.

Chives are the easiest  to grow (even easier than basil).  I planted some in the corners of my raised bed about 5 years ago, and they continue to grow and spread.  They reseed like crazy.

Quoting kirbymom: Yeah, pesto is definitely one of the expensive items out there. Now, do you grow all the herbs or just a select few?
Quoting Scribbleprints:

Lemon Basil (well, it's an herb, not a veggie, but still my fave).  I LOVE pesto, and would almost never be able to afford it if I didn't grow basil for it myself, cause pesto can only be made fresh (and fresh herbs are so expensive) or I would have to buy it jarred (also expensive).  And the dried stuff is great too...like regular basil but milder and definately with a lemony flavor and smell.  Plus, out here in Texas it is SO EASY to grow.  Unfortunately, once it gets colder it dries up, but we enjoy it all summer long.  And it self seeds.  

Quoting kirbymom: NICE!! I would love to be in a place to have such a garden as yours. Which veggie is your favorite?
Quoting Scribbleprints:

Well, in August I planted more cucumbers and hopefully can get  some bush beans planted soon (getting kind of late).  My garden is already full of peppers (which will last into November or even December if I cover them), a tomato plant (same), chives (never die), oregano (also never dies), swiss chard (doesn't die but sure is sad in the summer), and huge basil (which usually last until Sept/Oct).     Will be planting broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce soon (never grown the first two but want to try--lettuce is a yearly thing though).  Oh, and my carrots plant themselves--I accidentally left a seed packet out one year, and it blew into a corner of my yard, and grew better there than in my garden bed, so now I just let one of the carrots bloom and it reseeds itself over there..

Quoting kirbymom: Wow. What do you put in your garden?
Quoting Scribbleprints:

Be beggining of the fall planting season in Texas.  (Horrible to do gardening at this time of year though...it's why I sometimes miss those fall planting dates).





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