Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Homeschooling Moms Homeschooling Moms

Anyone have a child with Dyslexia?

Posted by on Aug. 22, 2014 at 8:59 PM
  • 16 Replies

I have a friend who's son has it.  He is in public school right now, but she was asking about resources to help him at home.  Do any of you have any suggestions?  Thanks!

by on Aug. 22, 2014 at 8:59 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Aug. 22, 2014 at 9:09 PM
1 mom liked this

May I be frank?


If yes, keep reading, lol.

I would NOT utilize any other programs at home with a dyslexic child. I just wouldn't. These children struggle enough with their school work load, that anything more is only going to overwhelm them.

On the chance that the child has an IEW or 504 plan that limits his homework, yes, I have suggestions.

Dancing Bears reading, and the sister spelling program Apples and Pears is great.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee

kmath
by Silver Member on Aug. 22, 2014 at 9:12 PM

I think he has an IEP, but I am not sure.  I will check with her.  I know she doesn't want to overwhelm him, she just knows he is falling further behind and the school doesn't seem to be helping much.  I'll give her your suggestions, and your warning.  Thanks!

Quoting AutymsMommy:

May I be frank?


If yes, keep reading, lol.

I would NOT utilize any other programs at home with a dyslexic child. I just wouldn't. These children struggle enough with their school work load, that anything more is only going to overwhelm them.

On the chance that the child has an IEW or 504 plan that limits his homework, yes, I have suggestions.

Dancing Bears reading, and the sister spelling program Apples and Pears is great.


Mandallyn
by Member on Aug. 22, 2014 at 10:21 PM
1 mom liked this

My oldest son has some mild diselxia (as do I).  After a while he will start mixing up his sounds, and saying words that are similar, but not the actual word.  It's like he doesn't see the entire word.  So I started having him stop, close his eyes, take a deep breath and then look at the word.  I used to have him say every letter of the word and then try again.  

It also depends on what kind of dislexia he has. http://www.dyslexia-reading-well.com/types-of-dyslexia.html

KChinapps
by Member on Aug. 23, 2014 at 1:18 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm dyslexic and so is one of my brothers. What helped us when we were in school was that our parents always encouraged us to read and read to us. It's very easy for learning to become frustrating, especially when everyone else is catching on quickly and you're still lost. That's why it's nice when things are done one on one at home and try not to get frustrated when the child doesn't understand something.

NYCitymomx3
by Bronze Member on Aug. 23, 2014 at 1:50 PM
4 moms liked this

My 13 y/o has moderate dyslexia.  I've suspected it since he was 8, but got a formal diagnosis 2 years ago.  We haven't changed what we use, but only some of how it's approached.  

We follow a Charlotte Mason method which I feel goes so well with any learning disability.  He narrates back all readings, does copywork and dictation exercises, lessons are short, and afternoons are free to pursue interests.   He is on or above grade level in all subjects now that I know what to do.  I try to make his subjects as hands-on as I can.  Here's some more of what works for us:

  • His writing is a mixture of handwriting and typing
  • He works out math on graph paper or a dry-erase board
  • Sequential Spelling was a big hit.  We started with Book 2 when he was 11.  We also had a "word wall" in the living room with words he had trouble with
  • His reading is a mixture of independent reading and read-alouds by me
  • Science is experiment-based or outdoor nature study 
  • We use maps and a globe with many of his readings, plus he enjoys updating his book of centuries and creating timelines
  • Artist and composer study is all hands on and sensory based
  • Field trips are frequent - living in NYC is great for that, lol


______________________________

Angela

DD(20) Hair Stylist (in training) in downtown Manhattan, graduating in late summer
DD(17) First semester dancer/singer/actress at a performing arts conservatory 
DS(13) Experiential homeschooler, mixed martial artist, Confirmand

CITYSCHOOLING

kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 24, 2014 at 12:31 PM
1 mom liked this
I do a lot of what you said in the first part of your post but not with the same program. I write the majority of all our schoolwork. :)

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

My 13 y/o has moderate dyslexia.  I've suspected it since he was 8, but got a formal diagnosis 2 years ago.  We haven't changed what we use, but only some of how it's approached.  

We follow a Charlotte Mason method which I feel goes so well with any learning disability.  He narrates back all readings, does copywork and dictation exercises, lessons are short, and afternoons are free to pursue interests.   He is on or above grade level in all subjects now that I know what to do.  I try to make his subjects as hands-on as I can.  Here's some more of what works for us:

  • His writing is a mixture of handwriting and typing
  • He works out math on graph paper or a dry-erase board
  • Sequential Spelling was a big hit.  We started with Book 2 when he was 11.  We also had a "word wall" in the living room with words he had trouble with
  • His reading is a mixture of independent reading and read-alouds by me
  • Science is experiment-based or outdoor nature study 
  • We use maps and a globe with many of his readings, plus he enjoys updating his book of centuries and creating timelines
  • Artist and composer study is all hands on and sensory based
  • Field trips are frequent - living in NYC is great for that, lol

kirbymom
by Sonja on Aug. 24, 2014 at 12:33 PM
1 mom liked this
Oh and I love the natural approach you have for this.

Quoting kirbymom: I do a lot of what you said in the first part of your post but not with the same program. I write the majority of all our schoolwork. :)

Quoting NYCitymomx3:

My 13 y/o has moderate dyslexia.  I've suspected it since he was 8, but got a formal diagnosis 2 years ago.  We haven't changed what we use, but only some of how it's approached.  

We follow a Charlotte Mason method which I feel goes so well with any learning disability.  He narrates back all readings, does copywork and dictation exercises, lessons are short, and afternoons are free to pursue interests.   He is on or above grade level in all subjects now that I know what to do.  I try to make his subjects as hands-on as I can.  Here's some more of what works for us:

  • His writing is a mixture of handwriting and typing
  • He works out math on graph paper or a dry-erase board
  • Sequential Spelling was a big hit.  We started with Book 2 when he was 11.  We also had a "word wall" in the living room with words he had trouble with
  • His reading is a mixture of independent reading and read-alouds by me
  • Science is experiment-based or outdoor nature study 
  • We use maps and a globe with many of his readings, plus he enjoys updating his book of centuries and creating timelines
  • Artist and composer study is all hands on and sensory based
  • Field trips are frequent - living in NYC is great for that, lol

mommy2kaelynn
by Member on Aug. 24, 2014 at 8:55 PM

The doctors believe my daugher may be dyslexic. We will be having her tested soon. I looked up Dancing Bears, Book A - Amazon Uk has it - they are VERY expensive! But I can't find a description of what levels I need to look at - Book A, B, or C.

HELP! 


MamaLauri
by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:39 PM
1 mom liked this

Kids with a label Dyslexia tend to have a right hemisphere / local connectivity dominate brain, due in part to a genetically stronger norepinephrine system as compared to dopamine. A dopamine friendly diet can be helpful (foods high in tyrosine, Omega-3, and antioxidants).

  http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-dyslexia-kelli-sandman-hurley is a wonderful video on the topic. 

This site has many things your friend needs. Special emphasis is placed on special child and special adults. But the site promotes joyful learning for all, and for older folks, cognitive and executive function maintenance.

Web site: http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/FunGames.html

Recomended Age Group: 3-103 years old

Brief Description: Multi-sensory games and activities to develop cognitive (reading, writing, math, critical thinking), social, and executive function skills. Including Read-Along Songbooks: a delightful way to build your reading skills. Tell-Me-A-Story Picture and Book of Pictures Develop your creative thinking and writing, by writing your own stories with these fanciful pictures. Read-Along Math Rap Songs to build your math skills. Read-Along Phonics Storybooks to build your phonics and reading skills. Read-Along Storybook Classics to build your vocabulary and love of reading. Read-Along Nursery Rhymes to build your phonics skills and love of words.  Letter and Number Fun including Letter Sounds, Letter Sound Songs, Word Building, and Alpha Animals to build your phonics skills. Learn to print Small Letters, Capital Letters, and Numbers animations. As well as Math, Memory, and Strategy Games for Everyone: Battleship, Checkers, Chinese Checkers, Sudoku, Sudoku for Beginners (4x4), Sudoku Jr (6x6), Snakes & Ladders, Tick Tac Toe, Yahtz 'A Dice, Picture Challenges, Concentration Challenges, I Know How You Feel - Games for People with Emotion Blindness, Alexithymia. About Face - Games for People with Face Blindness, Prosopagnosia.

MissMackiesgg
by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 4:53 PM
1 mom liked this

There are federal laws governing how the school has to work with him. I thought my middle grandgirl was dyslexic. When I finally got her doc and the school to listen to me, we found out that her eyes didn't converge. When you cross yor eyes they are supposed to look to the middle of your nose. One of her's didn't and one did. We did exercises and such until they started to work together.

Tell your friend to go online and find public law 94-142. I think the numbers are in the right order I am somewhat dyslexic myself.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN