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Dysgraphia

Posted by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 9:30 PM
  • 14 Replies

I think my 8 year old has dysgraphia. He has a hard time writing. He has a hard time staying on the lines and his words are always smashed together unless I sit with him and remind him to use a space. He had a speech delay until he was 6. He just began reading fluidly this year. Do any of you have any suggestions to make writing easier on him?

by on Aug. 25, 2014 at 9:30 PM
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DyslexiaParent
by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 9:46 PM
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It will depend upon the root cause of his difficulties with writing.  If he has fine-motor problems, then having occupational therapy might help.  If he has executive function, working memory, or attention deficits that make it hard for him to get his words on paper, then undertaking cognitive enhancement could help.  If he has visual-perception issues, then he'd need to have correction for that.   There is SOOO MUCH that goes into writing, it is difficult to know what will make writing easier without knowing the root cause of his difficulty.  

That said, it is GREAT that he began to read fluidly.  That might rule out dyslexia, except for the possibility of stealth dyslexia.  

Initially, you might want to work with maze puzzle books to help him with pencil control and to have him work on the eye-hand coordination without working on writing directly.  Using a program like Handwriting without tears and using the app on a tablet can help with writing fluency.  

If you suspect any cognitive issues (memory, processing, attention, etc.) then you might want to visit the list of cognitive enhancement programs I have on my website.  I used the Lexia Cross-Trainer program with my boys, but there are a lot of good programs available these days!

MethodMom
by Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 9:56 PM

Thank you so much. I had no idea that there could be so many causes for dysgraphia. I tried HWOT for 2 years. It has not helped. I also had him do a book called happy handwriting. Neither seemed to help. 

Quoting DyslexiaParent:

It will depend upon the root cause of his difficulties with writing.  If he has fine-motor problems, then having occupational therapy might help.  If he has executive function, working memory, or attention deficits that make it hard for him to get his words on paper, then undertaking cognitive enhancement could help.  If he has visual-perception issues, then he'd need to have correction for that.   There is SOOO MUCH that goes into writing, it is difficult to know what will make writing easier without knowing the root cause of his difficulty.  

That said, it is GREAT that he began to read fluidly.  That might rule out dyslexia, except for the possibility of stealth dyslexia.  Initially, you might want to work with maze puzzle books to help him with pencil control and to have him work on the eye-hand coordination without working on writing directly.  Using a program like Handwriting without tears and using the app on a tablet can help with writing fluency.  

If you suspect any cognitive issues (memory, processing, attention, etc.) then you might want to visit the list of cognitive enhancement programs I have on my website.  I used the Lexia Cross-Trainer program with my boys, but there are a lot of good programs available these days!


Bleacheddecay
by Bronze Member on Aug. 25, 2014 at 10:50 PM

Teach him to type. That's my main advice.

Silverkitty
by Bronze Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 10:32 AM
1 mom liked this

My daughter's handwriting is horrid, but her cursive is beautiful.  She has a problem getting words from her head to her hand, unless she types.

coala
by Silver Member on Aug. 26, 2014 at 1:58 PM

My youngest is slightly behind with fine motor skills and her handwritting is awful.  That is putting it nicely.  We are using ABeka's cursive and she is coming along, but she is writting like an end of year K and she is end of year 1st.  We are trying to be patient and I am trying to get daddy on board with that, but he is insistent that she needs more practice.  I personally feel she just needs more time to develop appropriately.  BTW my DD is end of year K start of 1st by PS standards.  I just need daddy to understand this.

MessedUpMama
by Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 4:34 AM
1 mom liked this

If he actually has dysgraphia, it's the writing version of dyslexia. My oldest has it. He has a hard time getting his hnd to write the words in his mind. He has to think about how to move the pecil to draw each letter of each word. Like dyslexia it only effects one aspect of using his hands. He can type faster than most people for example, but writing or drawing are slow and laborous for him. Your son will always have problems with writing. Teach him typing as soon as you can.

If he has other problems that are influencing his wring he might be able to learn how to write easier than my son did. Good luck.

MethodMom
by Member on Aug. 28, 2014 at 5:11 PM

Thank you . I have not had him tested. He has alays struggles with writing. He types just fine. So should I have him type out his history and science answers?


Quoting MessedUpMama:

If he actually has dysgraphia, it's the writing version of dyslexia. My oldest has it. He has a hard time getting his hnd to write the words in his mind. He has to think about how to move the pecil to draw each letter of each word. Like dyslexia it only effects one aspect of using his hands. He can type faster than most people for example, but writing or drawing are slow and laborous for him. Your son will always have problems with writing. Teach him typing as soon as you can.

If he has other problems that are influencing his wring he might be able to learn how to write easier than my son did. Good luck.


MessedUpMama
by Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 4:58 AM
1 mom liked this

 Yes, if the purpose is to find out what he knows, typing it out will be better for both of you. If the purpose is to teach him how to write using a pen and paper then have him write it. He will need a signature, of course, but he probably won't need to write much in his adult life. 

Quoting MethodMom:

Thank you . I have not had him tested. He has alays struggles with writing. He types just fine. So should I have him type out his history and science answers?

Quoting MessedUpMama:

If he actually has dysgraphia, it's the writing version of dyslexia. My oldest has it. He has a hard time getting his hand to write the words in his mind. He has to think about how to move the pencil to draw each letter of each word. Like dyslexia it only effects one aspect of using his hands. He can type faster than most people for example, but writing or drawing are slow and laborious for him. Your son will always have problems with writing. Teach him typing as soon as you can.

If he has other problems that are influencing his wring he might be able to learn how to write easier than my son did. Good luck.

 

Bluecalm
by Bronze Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 8:20 AM
My 7 year old just qualified for OT services because he has low tone in his hands. I found a Mead notebook that has raised lines and it's really helping him. Also the OT eval showed he has a visual perception problem which I did not even realize.

I'd suggest getting an OT eval, the raised line paper, and do as much work as possible orally or typed.
MethodMom
by Member on Aug. 29, 2014 at 2:47 PM

I think I have seen that paper somewhere before. That is a fantastic idea. I will seeif I can find some. Thank you for the suggestion. 


Quoting Bluecalm: My 7 year old just qualified for OT services because he has low tone in his hands. I found a Mead notebook that has raised lines and it's really helping him. Also the OT eval showed he has a visual perception problem which I did not even realize. I'd suggest getting an OT eval, the raised line paper, and do as much work as possible orally or typed.


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