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Leveling The Playing Field!?

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2015 at 1:50 PM
  • 8 Replies


To level playing field, SATs spot blacks 230-point ‘bonus,’ penalize Asians 50 points

Students taking test

So this is how fairness works. An article in the Los Angeles Times, which not only buries the lede but bears the unilluminating title “For Asian Americans, a changing landscape on college admissions,” reveals that the SAT — the standardized test used by college admissions offices the nation over — is guilty of racial bias … against students of Asian extraction.

And for so-called students of color.

According to Ann Lee, “co-founder of HS2 Academy, a college prep business that assumes that racial bias is a fact of college admissions and counsels students accordingly”:

African Americans received a “bonus” of 230 points….

“Hispanics received a bonus of 185 points.”…

Asian Americans … are penalized by 50 points — in other words, they had to do that much better to win admission.

“Do Asians need higher test scores? Is it harder for Asians to get into college? The answer is yes,” Lee says.

There is no mention of whether white students are penalized, but even if they are not, they are still disadvantaged by the edge given to black and Hispanic students.

The article goes on to acknowledge that “complaints about bias in college admissions have persisted since at least the 1920s, when a Harvard University president tried to cap the number of Jewish students,” adding:

In November, a group called Students for Fair Admissions filed a suit against Harvard University for admissions policies that allegedly discriminate against Asian Americans. The group cited the 2004 Princeton study and other sources that offer statistics about Asian Americans’ test performance.

At the University of Texas at Austin, an affirmative action policy that allows admissions committees to consider the race of prospective applicants has been argued all the way to the Supreme Court. (The policies were upheld by a lower court, but that court’s decision was voided by the Supreme Court. Another court upheld the policies and another appeal is pending.)

The revelation in this article comes at a time when one prominent university, the University of Minnesota, has knuckled under to demands from black students that the skin color of perpetrators of campus crime be kept out of crime email alerts lest the school be guilty of racial profiling. Is it not fascinating



Is this right or fair?
Shouldn't acception to College be based on how well a student worked or did not work?
Does this make you angry?
by on Mar. 4, 2015 at 1:50 PM
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Replies (1-8):
coala
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:05 PM

That is absurd.  If everyone pays attention and works hard they all have an equal chance.  I think it is unfair that they give that "bonus" to certain ethnicities and takes points away from another.

That isn't leveling the playing field in my opinion...it is setting people up for failure like the white population and the asian community.

Precious333
by Julia on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:08 PM
I don't understand their mentality at all :(
kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:15 PM

Then, how do you think it is harming the asian community?

Quoting coala:

That is absurd.  If everyone pays attention and works hard they all have an equal chance.  I think it is unfair that they give that "bonus" to certain ethnicities and takes points away from another.

That isn't leveling the playing field in my opinion...it is setting people up for failure like the white population and the asian community.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:22 PM

I don't either. It is sad that with the intelligence that this country was founded by, you'd think we would be ready for pitfalls such as this one. :(

Quoting Precious333: I don't understand their mentality at all :(


coala
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:45 PM
1 mom liked this

They are deducting 50 pts just because you are Asian.....that is how it is harmful.  They want to leave the system as it is for the white population.  The test isn't skewed in any one direction.  It is designed to test your test taking capabilities.  Some are better at it than others.

Personally, I'm a very intelligent person and scored terribly on the SAT and ACT.  Some people can take standardized tests and some can't.

Quoting kirbymom:

Then, how do you think it is harming the asian community?

Quoting coala:

That is absurd.  If everyone pays attention and works hard they all have an equal chance.  I think it is unfair that they give that "bonus" to certain ethnicities and takes points away from another.

That isn't leveling the playing field in my opinion...it is setting people up for failure like the white population and the asian community.


kirbymom
by Sonja on Mar. 4, 2015 at 3:58 PM

But aren't asians supposed to be that much more intelligent than americans? :: sarcasm inserted here ::

I know that I do not take tests very well at all! I am horrible at them, and I am pretty intelligent.

This just peeves me off that everyone HAS to have some sort of extra consideration based on ethnicity and race and NOT based on actual intelligence and performance. :(

Quoting coala:

They are deducting 50 pts just because you are Asian.....that is how it is harmful.  They want to leave the system as it is for the white population.  The test isn't skewed in any one direction.  It is designed to test your test taking capabilities.  Some are better at it than others.

Personally, I'm a very intelligent person and scored terribly on the SAT and ACT.  Some people can take standardized tests and some can't.

Quoting kirbymom:

Then, how do you think it is harming the asian community?

Quoting coala:

That is absurd.  If everyone pays attention and works hard they all have an equal chance.  I think it is unfair that they give that "bonus" to certain ethnicities and takes points away from another.

That isn't leveling the playing field in my opinion...it is setting people up for failure like the white population and the asian community.



SamuraiQueen
by on Mar. 4, 2015 at 8:06 PM
1 mom liked this

I've heard of this, and it's definitely not fair. It plays into stereotypes. Not all Asians take standardized tests well, even though they might be smart. Same goes for other races.

What if a Hispanic or an African American do really well? If they receive bonus points on top of their score then it is simply inflating their already good score. And if an Asian does poorly or at most average? If they get penalized 50 points then that sets their score back even more. It means that Asian students have to work that much harder just to offset the 50-point penalty. How is that leveling anything? It's absurd!

A test is a test, and results should be left alone.

Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Mar. 5, 2015 at 12:12 AM

Yes, I think that's absurd.  

This is the type of affirmitive action I think is just wrong.

However, I don't believe if everyone works hard they all have an equal chance.  If someone is from an area that riddled with gangs and such that's going to affect their schooling.  Those that are from wealtier families usually often have more opportunities for learning at a younger age (extracurricular activites, etc), while those from very poor families may have problems with hunger, proper housing, clothing, and medical care which could affect their learning.  

And racially, with black people specifically, there can a disadvantage handed down from slavery (yeah, yeah....I know, that was like 150+ years ago but just hear me out)  150 years ago is only 3-4 generations, plust it  was followed by Jim Crow and the lynching era.  If someone's  great-grandparents were forbidden from learning to read, and their grandparents were discouraged from any type of education (feared Lyching from acting "too smart," no incentive to get an education for a job you wouldn't be allowed to have, had schools which were substandard and segregated, etc,) then their lack of education and attitudes about education would affect the next generation, and some of that would spill over onto the generation afterwards, etc.    Not to mention poverty is hard to break free from and the decreased opportunities under Jim Crow meant that black people handed down a lot more poverty than other races did, which was our government's fault.  So some program to help decendants of people who went through that in this country to overcome those handed down obsticals is not unreasonable.

So while I disagree with THIS method (weighing test scores) I'm  not saying that colleges shouldn't do things to help people who came from difficult circumstances (regardless of race) or seek to to try to get adequate representations of all races at their schools (it's good for schools to have different perspectives in class conversations and such, so a diverse student body helps everyone--and grit in overcoming obstacles is a valid trait a college might seek).  But I don't think weighing test scores is the way to do it.  

I think it's ok to do other things, however, like recruit more in areas where there is high populations of races that are underepresented at your College, consider life experience (hardships...which might include poverty, coming from areas with gangs, loss of a parent, surviving abuse, being the first person in your family to try to go to college, ect..)  in how you weight the college application, etc. Colleges could also set up programs in high schools to help prepare students for College in areas with low collage attendance .   All that can be done without being unfair to students or making judgements based soley on race. 

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