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Need help getting started homeschooling special needs son

Posted by on Oct. 25, 2017 at 2:41 PM
  • 8 Replies

Does anyone homeschool their ASD child? I have a 6 year old severely autistic and nonverbal son. He’s been in public school since age 3. During his time in public school, he’s not met one iep goal. We had issues with his first school, because he kept escaping his classroom and the school called all the time because they couldn’t handle him crying. They told me several times that he was sick and when I picked him up, he’d be laughing and stimming. I even took him to the doctor several times and they always said he was fine. I chose against having him at this school this year because of safety reasons. He is currently in his neighborhood school and has made the most progress since starting school at this school. I was told today at an iep meeting that he is not allowed to stay at his current school any longer that I had to choose between his previous school or another school in a very bad area of town. I am considering homeschooling him for safety reasons. How does it work homeschooling someone that is mentally a lot younger than their actual age? What if his goals don’t get met during a year while homeschooling? He hasn’t had one goal met in almost 3 ½ years in public school. What curriculum would you use for someone with severe autism? Any help or tips would be appreciated.


by on Oct. 25, 2017 at 2:41 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Bethbeth
by Member on Oct. 26, 2017 at 12:05 AM

I homeschool my 3 kids, one of them is ASD. You need to read the laws for homeschooling in your state. In my state there are no rules about how much we cover in a year or what goals are met. So we could be 3 years ahead or 3 years behind and it matter. 

gramabrenda
by Member on Oct. 26, 2017 at 12:11 PM
1 mom liked this
I want to encourage you to use whatever resources are available. My autistic child is now a very successful bank head teller. We spent many tough hours in a one on one situation. She also went to public school and we worked together on drills starting at age 4.
 
I homeschooled my two sons who had managed to get themselves put in Special Education classes, which meant they would graduate with a Certificate of Attendance. This was not acceptable so my husband and I determined we could not do any worse. We took school at their pace, but we were always pushing them to do better. We used lots of outside activities and resources but stuck with a basic curriculum. The curriculum consisted of starting them where they were and progressing until completed. They are both good self supporting citizens. You can get a scope and sequence for every grade on the internet and use that as a guideline.
 
I am praying for you. You have a special challenge but you have already shown you are up to it. God bless you
tsatske2
by New Member on Oct. 26, 2017 at 12:16 PM

A lot depends on what his likes and tolerances are. Does he like being read to? Will he sit semi-quietly and watch TV? Does he like music? You need to find some activities to get him out among people, too, like story time at the library. 

Fredrica2
by on Nov. 18, 2017 at 1:28 PM

You are faced with a very difficult decision. It seems to me that the organization that you decide to home school with, would be the best at determining the curriculum that you use. Have you looked into approved home schools? Are there home schools for students with special needs? If your child has not met his goals in several years, it does not sound like your child is receiving the right services and placement. What other types of schools and services have been suggested to educate your child? I pray that you will make the best choice for educating your child.

Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Nov. 20, 2017 at 1:01 AM

My kiddo isn't ASD, but I've been getting help for other issues he has at the Well Trained Mind forums.   They have a whole section just for "Learning Challenges"  and I'm certain someone there would know how to help. 

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/?_ga=2.96453020.1644646897.1511157401-1640552612.1488222182

collinsmommy0
by Kim on Nov. 30, 2017 at 7:03 PM
I used to teach in an ASd classroom, although it was high functioning kids, who were spending almost half of their day in general ed. There are definitely things to consider with curriculum and such. For a non-verbal child, you would likely be using a preschool curriculum instead of a grade level curriculum, or one made for children with ASD that are non verbal. You can get some services from the school district still, I think.....you would have to look into the laws about that for your state (services like OT or speech).

I would consider how much work you would put in. It will probably be a lot more difficult to homeschool a non verbal child, especially if there are avoidance behaviors happening at school. So I would possibly talk to a behaviorist who can give you some advice. One of the issues is that the most progress you typically see in individually with disabilities is in the younger years - so those years will likely be the most difficult for you, with the longest number of hours and intensity of work.

With all of that being considered, if I were in the same situation I would also pull my son out, and have a very strict routine set up with lots of hours working one on one with him.
tuffymama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 2, 2017 at 8:07 PM

Is there an autism center or therapy group in your area? There is one in the next town over from me and I used them as a resource to find other resources. Many autism centers have parent training and home education support. The ones who don't sometimes have community outreach programs that can put you in touch with professionals who can guide you. Some of the centers have on-site educations programs for kids of varying abilities. My favorite centers are the ones that incorporate nutritional therapies into the rest (ours doesn't LOL). Anyway, I hope this idea is helpful. With the ASD population growing by leaps and bounds, there are many more community resources out there than ever before. You do NOT have to feel isolated!

PinkButterfly66
by on Dec. 2, 2017 at 8:21 PM
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