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Hit me with it all

Posted by on Oct. 27, 2017 at 4:54 PM
  • 12 Replies
What do you think I would need for homeschooling a 3rd grader or 4th grader. What supplies.

I literally know nothing about curriculum. How do I know where to start or whwere to find some that work for us.

I am unsure still of where or how to begin. Lol. Any info or good places to research more ?
by on Oct. 27, 2017 at 4:54 PM
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Replies (1-10):
libbybell
by New Member on Oct. 27, 2017 at 6:09 PM
I use the Abeka DVD program. It comes with everything you need. I just make sure she completes her work. They even grade her work.
Leissaintexas
by Silver Member on Oct. 28, 2017 at 10:26 AM
This is a pretty layered question. What you need for homeschooling really all depends on what kind of education you want them to have.

Some families want "school at home" and go with a very heavily regimented curriculum like Abeka academy. Some families want a more natural approach and just raid the library every week and utilize the Charlotte Mason approach.

I personally like a very eclectic method. I've used CLE workbooks, Abeka textbooks, Notgrass history, Apologia for science, and somrtimes just library books as our sole curriculum.

One very complete, but very overwhelming resource is the Rainbow Catalogue. I'm not even lying, it weighs two pounds, it's over 1,000 pages of curriculum options. It helps if you narrow down your child's learning style. It's still just trial and error, rarely does anyone get it right on the first try. If you have a HS fellowship group, or a mentor who's taking you under her wing, ask questions, take a look at their materials, get a feel for what's available, and use that information to form a plan or develop your own education style.

My advice to a brand new homeschool family is to deschool for a few months, stock up on library books, and get a few spiral notebooks and just journal.
lovingladyo4
by New Member on Dec. 5, 2017 at 7:05 PM

One of the most beautiful freedoms about homeschooling is how you can customize the curriculum to match your goals and the kids learning styles. The market is absolutely flooded with material, enough to make you dizzy. Start slow and build so you can get comfortable and get a better idea of how you want to teach. There is never one right way and a bunch of wrong ways. 

Start by using easy lessons around the house - projects, chores, responsibilities, numbers, colors, reading, crafts learning. Get to know how your children learn, and then try to find a method that draws out their very best. I know my answer is vague but without sitting down and talking to you more in depth, it's hard to squeeze the enormity of this topic into this small space.

gramabrenda
by Member on Dec. 7, 2017 at 3:37 PM
Wow, you are ready for such an adventure of learning and teaching your child in the freedom of your own enviorment. Your responders posted some curriculum I never heard about and I have been doing this a long time and helped many homeschoolers. But one thing I want to remind you about is to check on the laws of your state. This may dictate the curriculum you use.
I homeschool my grandson at 3rd/4th grade level. We use Abeka curriculum and supplement things we enjoy. His parents do a lot of field trips with him and we explore the things he is interested in learning more about. Some days we do application: cooking- reading recipes, planning meals, math etc or shop- again reading, planning, math. I really enjoy project learning or portfolio learning and so does he, so we will probably go to that once he has the basic learning accomplished.
I pray that you will find something that is just right and that you will be able to enjoy the experience. Blessings on this new experience in your family.
Raggedylaura
by Member on Dec. 7, 2017 at 6:38 PM

http://hens-and-chicks.blogspot.com/2016/03/200-day-biblical-classical-curriculum.html


We use this home-made curriculum.  Very affordable to use these types of resources!

Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Dec. 8, 2017 at 11:46 AM

OK, if you can buy or borrow it, Cathy Duffy's 100 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum is a good start (some years it's 101 or 102 top picks if you are buying used).   It's a Christian book, so comes from that perspective, but the general guidelines on picking the right curriculum for you in the front are great for anyone, Christian or not.

Curriculum can come in boxed sets covering all/most subject, or you can buy them individually for subjects.   Personally, I prefer to buy individually, and starting out I think it's good to buy curriculum for each subject gradually (ie, get something for math or reading first, then gradually add on things like history, science, etc.  That way you have time to get used to teaching one thing before adding another...its so much easier to add one more thing once you get a rythm down for other things then to try to learn how to teach everything at once.  Also, whatever curriculum you start with, it will teach you about how your children learn and how you teach.  There is no perfect curriculum and no "best curriculum" just curriculum that fits your family and their needs, and ones that don't.   Don't be afraid to try something new if what you're using doesn't click. 

Unit studies are another great option, especially for things like history and science.   Since they are generally shorter (anywhere from a week to a few months long) you can try out things without having to commit long term to a curriculum.  They can be a good way to start out too as you can do something your kids are interested in...and often they pull in other subjects (like in a unit study on caves we learned about food webs, geology, some history, etc.).

Even at just one year apart you will probably will have to teach your kids at different levels for math and maybe reading too (though you can certainly overlap literature books with them being that close).   But history and science (and any other subjects you choose to add, like music, art, etc.) could absolutely be done together.

You'll want general school supplies like paper, crayons, pencils, etc.   A printer is invaluable.  I use small lap size dry erase boards and pens like crazy.  I personally use a lot of short you-tube videos to supplement our history and science lessons...so I use a computer a lot (or my phone), but that's up to you (some don't like any tech in their homeschool).   

But you don't need a special school room or anything like that (we do our schooling all over...at the kitchen table, sitting on the floor in the living room, in my child's room sitting in his bed).



Karma-karma
by New Member on Dec. 24, 2017 at 10:25 PM
Thanks. There are just so many fears I guess. I am scared because it is so new and I literally am not sure what I am doing. And I am still struggling with this decision because there are alot of reasons keeping my child in school is better for him. But just as many that taking him out would be better for him. So this has been a tremendously hard choice.

I suppose we could try it for a year. It could not hurt much I would say, especially in the elementary school years. But I decided not to start this year and to wait for school next year.

Who knows. Maybe I will start this summer so we better know going into it if we are ready.

Quoting lovingladyo4:

One of the most beautiful freedoms about homeschooling is how you can customize the curriculum to match your goals and the kids learning styles. The market is absolutely flooded with material, enough to make you dizzy. Start slow and build so you can get comfortable and get a better idea of how you want to teach. There is never one right way and a bunch of wrong ways. 

Start by using easy lessons around the house - projects, chores, responsibilities, numbers, colors, reading, crafts learning. Get to know how your children learn, and then try to find a method that draws out their very best. I know my answer is vague but without sitting down and talking to you more in depth, it's hard to squeeze the enormity of this topic into this small space.

coala
by Gold Member on Jan. 11, 2018 at 9:37 PM

How do they grade the work?

We have been using their accredited program for 7 years now and I have to grade everything that gets sent in with the progress report.  I do not grade penmanship tests.  If I did that my kids would get giant F's and the school changes the grade to B or C.  I do get a report card back.

Quoting libbybell: I use the Abeka DVD program. It comes with everything you need. I just make sure she completes her work. They even grade her work.


coala
by Gold Member on Jan. 11, 2018 at 9:40 PM

If you are going to start next year then start looking for homeschool conventions.  Find one in your area.  There will be tons of vendors there and you can put your hands on almost every thing they sell.  Pick it up and look at it.  Ask questions.  These are great places to get questions answered as well.  Find a local homeschooling group and start picking the brains of some of the families homeschooling kids in your area.  You have some time to start working through this and setting things up for your kids.

My family has been homeschooling for 7 years.  It wasn't an easy choice, but it has been the best thing for my kids.  We happened to fall into a curriculum that works very well for us.  I know a lot of families aren't nearly as lucky as we were.

Quoting Karma-karma: Thanks. There are just so many fears I guess. I am scared because it is so new and I literally am not sure what I am doing. And I am still struggling with this decision because there are alot of reasons keeping my child in school is better for him. But just as many that taking him out would be better for him. So this has been a tremendously hard choice. I suppose we could try it for a year. It could not hurt much I would say, especially in the elementary school years. But I decided not to start this year and to wait for school next year. Who knows. Maybe I will start this summer so we better know going into it if we are ready.
Quoting lovingladyo4:

One of the most beautiful freedoms about homeschooling is how you can customize the curriculum to match your goals and the kids learning styles. The market is absolutely flooded with material, enough to make you dizzy. Start slow and build so you can get comfortable and get a better idea of how you want to teach. There is never one right way and a bunch of wrong ways. 

Start by using easy lessons around the house - projects, chores, responsibilities, numbers, colors, reading, crafts learning. Get to know how your children learn, and then try to find a method that draws out their very best. I know my answer is vague but without sitting down and talking to you more in depth, it's hard to squeeze the enormity of this topic into this small space.


libbybell
by New Member on Jan. 12, 2018 at 1:42 PM
You send it off after it is completed.

Quoting coala:

How do they grade the work?

We have been using their accredited program for 7 years now and I have to grade everything that gets sent in with the progress report.  I do not grade penmanship tests.  If I did that my kids would get giant F's and the school changes the grade to B or C.  I do get a report card back.

Quoting libbybell: I use the Abeka DVD program. It comes with everything you need. I just make sure she completes her work. They even grade her work.

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