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Introducing myself

Posted by on Mar. 13, 2018 at 2:38 PM
  • 7 Replies

Hi, my names Evelyn and I live in SW Missouri. Technically
I am not a homeschool mom. I am a nanny/homeschool teacher. The two children I take care of have been removed from school because of learning and anger issues(for one). One is nine and the other is eight. The boy has difficulties in reading and does very well in math and science. He is on a first grade reading level just barely.  The girl is almost on 2n/3rd grade and is a little behind on math but not much. She is the one who has anger issues and sometimes refuses to do her work.

I've worked with younger children and have my associates degree in early childhood development and have did childcare in one type of setting or another for over 40 years. I did nanny/homeschooling for almost ten years for a set of twins  also but its been nearly 20 years ago so a lot has changed.Plus raising my ADHD daughter and now raising my  granddaughter.

Any information help and support would be appreciated.

by on Mar. 13, 2018 at 2:38 PM
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Replies (1-7):
Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Mar. 13, 2018 at 10:08 PM

Hi!   Welcome to the group!

So, do the parents curriculum you are helping them teach, or are you just watching them and they are doing the majority of the teaching? 

kuntrylady56
by New Member on Mar. 14, 2018 at 1:11 PM

I do the teaching. But the grandmother who is raising the children has the work books the I pull their weekely work sheets out of on each subject. But I set up the weekly curriculumn plan and whatever else we are working on. And we have a theme, for example we're working on Spring so everything ties into that in one way or the other. I mainly do math,reading,writing and spelling every day. Then alternate social studies and science, art and phys ed.


Quoting Scribbleprints:

Hi!   Welcome to the group!

So, do the parents curriculum you are helping them teach, or are you just watching them and they are doing the majority of the teaching? 


nicki.hemingway
by Member on Mar. 15, 2018 at 1:12 PM

If they were just pulled out give it time.  It took us a year or so for my ds to catch up due to gross incompetence from the PS and really his reading still needs work.  Read to the kids, help them to love to learn again, and the rest will fall into place. 

Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Mar. 15, 2018 at 10:09 PM

Glad you understood in spite of my horrible typo.   Yeah, I agree, if they were just pulled, give them time.

On the reading, going through that with my own son.  If after a while the one struggling with reading is still struggling, I'd do a few things....

1.  Make sure the reading curriculum is phonics based, and if not talk to the parents about changing to something stronger in phonics. 

2. Try adding in practice with nonsense words.  What I mean by this is that whatever phonics rule you're studying, have the child practice with made up words that use that rule (not real words).   This discourages guessing, and helps you get a better understanding of what the child knows and doesn't know.  It's really helped my child.

Quoting kuntrylady56:

I do the teaching. But the grandmother who is raising the children has the work books the I pull their weekely work sheets out of on each subject. But I set up the weekly curriculumn plan and whatever else we are working on. And we have a theme, for example we're working on Spring so everything ties into that in one way or the other. I mainly do math,reading,writing and spelling every day. Then alternate social studies and science, art and phys ed.


Quoting Scribbleprints:

Hi!   Welcome to the group!

So, do the parents curriculum you are helping them teach, or are you just watching them and they are doing the majority of the teaching? 



Scribbleprints
by Group Admin on Mar. 15, 2018 at 10:20 PM

Some ideas for when one of them refuses to do the work....

If you notice she's getting frustrated, suggest she take a break and have a snack.   Mine didn't get angry...he would break into tears, but it could be the same thing underneath.   We called the snack breaks "getting some brain food" (and  that's actually pretty accurate...thinking actually burns calories, and studies have shown eating while thinking about a difficult problem actually can help).  We would keep popcorn/goldfish/granola bars and such at the table where we did school work to save time.   It helped so much.

Sometimes just taking a 10-15 minute break and coming back to it helps.  Or you could try going to another subject, and then coming back.   As long as you are consistent on getting back to the work, it doesn't set up the idea that you're going to get out of this by being angry.  But I find it's hard to get any real work done with an angry child.

MomLeslieM
by on Mar. 16, 2018 at 1:47 PM

hi Evelyn!  In reality not much should have changed in the last 20 years as far as how children learn and what they need to learn at the ages of 8 and 9 :-)  It sounds like you have a LOT of experience in understanding kids and working with them.  When I was homeschooling my 2 (who are now both in college), I found that working with them rather than against them was key to everyone being happy and learning!  It sounds kind of obvious to say work with them not against them but what I mean is figure out the way each of them learns best (and it probably won't be the same way!!).  Do they work best in the morning or afternoon?  or even evening?  Are they better at sit down work or are they more active and need to move?  Do they need simple black and white, not too much on the page or do they prefer lots of color and pictures/words all over the page?  Are the independent learners or do they learn better by someone else teaching them?  Once you can figure out some of their learning traits start to incorporate that into what you are using.  Remember too that it's OK to take frequent breaks throughout the day and homeschooling shouldn't even begin to take as long of a day as the public school day was for so many reasons!!!  And as always...ONE DAY AT A TIME!!!  :-)

kuntrylady56
by New Member on Mar. 20, 2018 at 1:47 PM

Thanks for all the ideas and encouragement. The boy has been out of public schools for at least two years and girl about one. I try being patient with the girl and give her breaks just to clam down or get a bite to eat. But her grandmother allows her to get away with not doing her work with me and then she'll do it at night with her, I feel this is undermining my authority. Because she knows she can get away with it! I feel if I am getting paid to be here to teach both of them, then she needs to be doing her work during the assigned time, not when she feels like it. This is what makes it so fustrating. But she is not my child.

I am working with the boy using phonics and helping him break the words down to syllables if there is more then one. He is nine years old and barely can read first grade words. Its going to take a lot of repition and keeping him engaged.

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