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Mother of 3 beautiful children...6yrs,2yrs and 4 months...Think I may be prego again?

Posted by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:20 PM
  • 29 Replies

ok so... I had a baby four months ago.. I just stopped bleeding two months ago due to the placenta being left in and I passed it myself... after finishing bleeding i asked my doctor for and iud to be put in and she said i could not have one put in until after i had my colpscopy done... she would also not give me any birth control as i clot when one it... My colpscopy is not until april this year. i have been very careful avoiding sex all together and well acouple weeks ago one thing led to another and the condom broke... My period was expected for the 25 of jan and still has yet to arrive.. i know i am not done having kids as i do want a big family but not now i was hoping like atleast 2 to 4 yrs from now... has anyone gotten pregnant so close together and is it safe..? im just really nervous i know i need to take a test but guess im just scared of the out come..

Thanks for reading... and info would be great!

by on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:20 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Lovemyshadows
by Carol on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:25 PM
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My boys are 11 months apart.  Andrew was born September 1st and Bryan was born the 15 th of October the following year.  It's hard but they are 33 and 32 today.

marchantmom06
by Bronze Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:34 PM
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Honey they drs don't leave the placenta in. Period.

And it's a colonoscopy.. Why are you having one? An IUD wouldn't effect that at all.
Go take a pregnancy test and find out.
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momma1225
by New Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 12:39 PM

ya they do leave the placenta in... happened with both my boys... n no its colpscopy...cervical cancer... iud does effect it as they have to cut my uterus for a biopsy

bigmama423
by Liz on Jan. 31, 2013 at 1:21 PM
My oldest 2 are 10 months apart. My son was born in January 05 & my daughter November 05. My daughter was healthy and there were no complications. It isn't advised though, and I'm sure there can be risks.
It can take awhile for periods to regulate after birth as well.
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marchantmom06
by Bronze Member on Jan. 31, 2013 at 1:44 PM
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No they do not. You need to talk to an attorney if your dr left your placenta in twice. Which i highly doubt.
And it colposcopy.


Quoting momma1225:

ya they do leave the placenta in... happened with both my boys... n no its colpscopy...cervical cancer... iud does effect it as they have to cut my uterus for a biopsy


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Kodysmommy928
by Jennifer on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:17 PM
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Woah, the placenta was left in?  The placenta must always be removed right away or it can result in a hysterectomy.  That really doesn't sound right at all. 

Kodysmommy928
by Jennifer on Jan. 31, 2013 at 2:22 PM


Retained Placenta

,

A retained placenta occurs when all or part of the placenta remains inside the uterus after child birth.  Normally the placenta is delivered within minutes to an hour after child birth. For some women, the placenta doe not deliver naturally and must be physically removed.

There are three main types of retained placenta:

Trapped Placenta: The placenta detaches from the uterus but becomes trapped due to the cervix closing.

Partial Accreta:  The placenta grows into and becomes deeply attached to the uterus. This prevents detachment.

Placenta Adherens:  The muscular layer of the uterus fails to contract.

Retained placenta can occur for several reasons or for no reason at all.

Causes of retained placenta include:

Weak or insufficient uterine contractions: Uterine contractions are what cause the placenta to detach and ultimately become expelled from the vagina. If the muscle (the uterus is a series of tissue layers, mostly comprised of muscle tissue) contractions are weak or uncoordinated, the placenta will not be able to come out on its own.

Uterine anomalies: An abnormally shaped uterus can prevent the placenta from being expelled.

Hormonal Causes: During childbirth, the hormone oxytocin is released into the blood. Oxytocin is responsible for uterine muscle contractions. If for some reason, adrenaline is released into the blood (adrenaline is a hormone released into the blood during “fight or flight” response) oxytocin release can be inhibited and therefore prevent the uterus from contracting.

Treatment for retained placenta

Treatment for retained placenta depends on the cause.  For women experiencing a placenta that has separated from the uterine wall but are unable to deliver the placenta, many doctors perform what is called “Controlled Cord Traction.” With CCT, the umbilical cord is lightly pulled on to help the body expel the placenta.

Manual removal of the placenta can either be performed in the delivery room or in an operating room. Manual removal can involve a doctor placing their hand inside the uterus and gently removing the placenta from the uterine wall. When the placenta is separated, the doctor can then take hold of the placenta, remove it from the uterus and then vagina.

In some instances, the placenta is unable to be removed whole so it is removed in pieces. Sometimes it is also necessary to use surgical tools to scrape the uterus to remove all placental debris.

In cases where the placenta has deeply grown into the uterus, removal is only possible by hysterectomy. A hysterectomy is the surgical removal of the uterus. A woman who undergoes a hysterectomy will be unable to carry any future pregnancies.

Risks:

A retained placenta is a potential life threatening situation. After the placenta is delivered, the uterus contracting causes the blood vessels within it to constrict. If the placenta is retained, the uterus is unable to perform this function. If the blood vessels are not closed off, they continue to bleed. This could cause the women to lose a large amount of blood and possibly require blood transfusions.

A retained placenta, specifically in instances where placental debris is left within the uterus, can cause severe infection and fertility issues.  Labor and delivery professionals are trained and aware of the signs and symptoms of retained placenta and know how to treat them accordingly. Incidence of retained placenta is actually quite low and so are complications.

Any questions in regards to your health should be addressed with your health care provider.

Bmama1
by Bernadette on Jan. 31, 2013 at 3:44 PM
My twins and my youngest are 1yr and 1 day apart.
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Kodysmommy928
by Jennifer on Jan. 31, 2013 at 3:47 PM

3 birthdays in 2 days?  You are brave, woman!

Quoting Bmama1:

My twins and my youngest are 1yr and 1 day apart.


Bmama1
by Bernadette on Jan. 31, 2013 at 3:51 PM
Lol yeah its craziness in my house in march/april.

My oldest and I share a birthday (march11), then the twins share a birthday (march31) then my youngest is april 1st. He was 6hours late from sharing with the twins. Lol.


Quoting Kodysmommy928:

3 birthdays in 2 days?  You are brave, woman!

Quoting Bmama1:

My twins and my youngest are 1yr and 1 day apart.


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