Advertisement
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Fresh green bean prep question?

Posted by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 10:40 AM
  • 16 Replies

I just bought my first batch of fresh green beans. I bought a pound. I found that I need to wash and pull off the ends to prep before I cook. Ok, easy enough. My question is, can I do this all at once for the whole pound, even though I won't cook it all at once? Or is it better to wash and cut as I need them for meals? If I can do the whole pound, how do I store them? Right now they are just in the veggie bag from the store.  I'm new at fresh food prep, storage, and cooking, lol! Hopefully some of ya'll have more experience!

~peace~
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 10:40 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Lindalou907
by Bronze Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 12:50 PM
1 mom liked this

Good question! I don't know! But just in the interest of time management I would do them all at once and then maybe freeze what you aren't going to eat right away. Half of all produce gets wasted in this country and I think sometimes it's just because we don't feel like eating it again the next day or two :)

sarasue719
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:56 PM


I know! That is what I fear! Yes, its a great deal to buy fresh and not prepackaged, but I guess the extra 5 minutes it takes to wash and pull off the ends is too much. Lol! We are trying to be a healthier and more cost effective family so I think freezing is a good idea!

I just hear freezing makes them lose the nutrients? But maybe that is why people say to blanch them first?

Lol, I just dont know!

Quoting Lindalou907:

Good question! I don't know! But just in the interest of time management I would do them all at once and then maybe freeze what you aren't going to eat right away. Half of all produce gets wasted in this country and I think sometimes it's just because we don't feel like eating it again the next day or two :)



~peace~
Kris_PBG
by Representative on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:42 PM
1 mom liked this
My family picks on them raw as snacks, so we just keep them in the fridge and wash/de-end them a handful at a time!
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
StepDucky
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 4:13 PM
1 mom liked this

I wash and pop the ends off as I need them... They are super easy and hardly any work!


i boil mine for 4-5 mins then pull them out of the water.... You're suppose to put them in an ice bath but I never do... I immediately put a little olive oil, fresh garlic, salt, and pepper on them to season and then serve. They are a family favorite!

sarasue719
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 5:08 PM
Do you put them in already boiling water or put them in and let the water get to a boil?


Quoting StepDucky:

I wash and pop the ends off as I need them... They are super easy and hardly any work!


i boil mine for 4-5 mins then pull them out of the water.... You're suppose to put them in an ice bath but I never do... I immediately put a little olive oil, fresh garlic, salt, and pepper on them to season and then serve. They are a family favorite!


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
taniamorse85
by Bronze Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 5:41 PM
1 mom liked this

It's generally better prep them as needed.  If you pull off the ends and let them sit for a while, even in the fridge, exposure to the air can make them start to get mushy at the ends.  That can eventually spread if they are left for too long.  Also, don't forget to pull off the strings.  When you pull off the ends, the string for each bean should start to come off as well.  Just pull steadily, and it will come off.  Also, unless you want to keep them long, snap them into bite-sized pieces at this point.  As for cooking, boil the water first, then add the beans.  When they are fork-tender (a fork pokes easily into them), they are ready.

sarasue719
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:46 PM
Lol ok you just blew my mind! Pull the string off? Is that needed? I just cut off the ends after looking at the pre packaged stuff that's what it looked like. I did that, boiled, and sauteed....they tasted good!


Quoting taniamorse85:

It's generally better prep them as needed.  If you pull off the ends and let them sit for a while, even in the fridge, exposure to the air can make them start to get mushy at the ends.  That can eventually spread if they are left for too long.  Also, don't forget to pull off the strings.  When you pull off the ends, the string for each bean should start to come off as well.  Just pull steadily, and it will come off.  Also, unless you want to keep them long, snap them into bite-sized pieces at this point.  As for cooking, boil the water first, then add the beans.  When they are fork-tender (a fork pokes easily into them), they are ready.


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
taniamorse85
by Bronze Member on Mar. 26, 2013 at 12:52 AM
1 mom liked this

I always remove the strings.  If not, they get stuck in the throat rather easily, and it's really uncomfortable and often difficult to get them down.  I guess you got lucky!


Quoting sarasue719:

Lol ok you just blew my mind! Pull the string off? Is that needed? I just cut off the ends after looking at the pre packaged stuff that's what it looked like. I did that, boiled, and sauteed....they tasted good!


Quoting taniamorse85:

It's generally better prep them as needed.  If you pull off the ends and let them sit for a while, even in the fridge, exposure to the air can make them start to get mushy at the ends.  That can eventually spread if they are left for too long.  Also, don't forget to pull off the strings.  When you pull off the ends, the string for each bean should start to come off as well.  Just pull steadily, and it will come off.  Also, unless you want to keep them long, snap them into bite-sized pieces at this point.  As for cooking, boil the water first, then add the beans.  When they are fork-tender (a fork pokes easily into them), they are ready.




sabrtooth1
by on Mar. 26, 2013 at 1:04 AM
1 mom liked this

Cut off the stem end--no need to cut the pointy tip unless it's spoiled. No need to pull the string unless it bothers you--it cooks just fine & Is rarely tough. 1 pound isn't THAT much. Cook them all; the cooked last longer than the fresh, and you can use them several ways over several days. Rinse and put in a pot with ONLY about 1--1.5 inches of water, and put a SPLASH of olive oil on them--the olive oil makes them keep a beautiful bright green color. Give them a little stir to coat all the beans. THEN turn on the heat. You just want to STEAM them--not boil them in a quart of water--you boil out all the nutrients, plus they end up looking like grey mush. Cover tightly and bring to boil. Usually by the time they have just reached a rolling boil, they're done. If they're still a little tough, recover and give them another minute. Do NOT over cook. Drain the beans. We put a little red wine vinegar on the oily beans, with a little italian herbs, and that becomes beans with homemade Italian Dressing for the first meal.  For the leftovers, we add crumbled feta cheese and black olives, and it stretches to become a side dish. IF there is any left the 3rd day, it goes into a bowl of mixed lettuce, with a chopped cooked chicken breast, and a little more oil & vinegar to become a complete dinner.

The steaming in an inch of water, with a splash of olive oil, works for ANY green veggie--like broccoli, rabe,  brussel sprouts( cut stem, pull off discolored leaves, and cut in half lengthwise), and asparagus.  The best way to get just the tender part of the asparagus, is to just take the stalk and BEND--it will break in half where the tender part stops.  Discard the stem end and then rinse  the top half well.  We saute asparagus in a fry pan, with just the water clinging to it, a splash of oil, and a shake of garlic POWDER.

NEVER put salt, or vinegar, in the cooking pan with veggies.  It makes them mushy & nasty colored.  Put it on after they are cooked.

beckolette
by Member on Mar. 26, 2013 at 12:15 PM
1 mom liked this

Some beans do not have the tough string. The string develops as the bean ages and goes to seed. Young beans are slender without the bean showing as a bump of the mature bean. When picking at the store or farm market, sort out the beans that show a noticable bump. The mature bean will be tough skinned and nearly un-chewable. 

Snap beans right before cooking so they are fresh and crisp. Older beans also show rust coloring, these are safe to eat but again are tough.

My favorite way to have green beans is with a few slices of bacon added to the pot and after they are cooked tender add a Tablespoon or two of ketchup. This was my Grandmothers way of cooking the older beans from the picking and you cooked them long until they were tender. We used every thing God gaves us, as my mother said, Waste Not, Want Not. Her view was if you didn't use what God provided he would give you less next year. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)