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Please explain why this is considered racist... (edited to add...)

Posted by on Mar. 2, 2014 at 12:23 PM
Amy
  • 145 Replies
5 moms liked this

I'm not trying to be disrespectful or anything, I'm truly curious and want to understand.

When we celebrate St. Patrick's Day we eat Irish type foods like corned beef and cabbage, soda bread and drink Guiness.  When Cinco de Mayo comes around we eat Mexican food.  When it's time for Oktoberfest, we indulge in German delicacies & beer.  So, I'm not sure why it's considered offensive to eat things like fried chicken & collard greens during Black History Month.  Aren't those just traditional southern foods?  Do they really have to do with being African American? And if so, why would it be offensive or racist to eat them?

If anyone can explain the difference and why it's considered to be offensive to eat/serve these types of foods, please share.


Edited to add: The reason I'm curious about this is that recently I read about a couple of different schools that received serious backlash for either planning to, or serving, these types of foods to students during Black History Month, and I'm curious as to why it was such a big deal.

by on Mar. 2, 2014 at 12:23 PM
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Replies (1-10):
BreezeAlanna
by on Mar. 2, 2014 at 12:24 PM
15 moms liked this

Im not touching that with a 10 foot pole.

fliptopz4
by New Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 12:27 PM
6 moms liked this

I've never heard of eating anything special in February for black history month. As far as the others go they all just seem a reason to drink to me. Fried chicken and collards are southern food not necessarily black food. Everybody I know eats that.

lil_momma1411
by Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 1:32 PM
10 moms liked this
I live in Alabama and fried chicken and greens and all that is normal good eatin here lol
amonkeymom
by Amy on Mar. 2, 2014 at 1:52 PM
1 mom liked this

Well see, now that's what I thought.  So I'm not sure why it was such a big deal for those schools to want to serve it.

Quoting lil_momma1411: I live in Alabama and fried chicken and greens and all that is normal good eatin here lol


lil_momma1411
by Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 1:55 PM
Some people think that the African Americans introduced those foods to us. Maybe they did I really don't know

Quoting amonkeymom:

Well see, now that's what I thought.  So I'm not sure why it was such a big deal for those schools to want to serve it.

Quoting lil_momma1411: I live in Alabama and fried chicken and greens and all that is normal good eatin here lol

cjsmom1
by Silver Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 2:00 PM
8 moms liked this

People find it offensive because those aren't "black" foods, they are typically foods that are eaten in the south. I think people are trying to get rid of the stereotypes thaat are associated with black people.

Fordprefect
by Member on Mar. 2, 2014 at 2:02 PM
6 moms liked this

I have never heard of this being something that happens. I don't think they are "black" foods so much as they are southern foods, so it seems weird to serve it to studentsfor educational purposes.

MonarchMom22
by on Mar. 2, 2014 at 2:13 PM
24 moms liked this

The other examples you gave are considred feast days.  Like having turkey on Thanksgiving, or pancakes on Fat Tuesday.

Black History month is meant to educate students on the history of African Americans, their contributions to American life, the horror of slavery, the Civil Rights movement, and the other culturs that black people derive from.  Much of this is absent, or has been glossed over, in history class for previous generations.

Using typical southern food is not an accurate or meaningful way to educate on this topic.  It is not the food brought over with their ancestors, nor is it encompassing of their many ethnic backgrounds.  It is just an old sterotype of the South.

amonkeymom
by Amy on Mar. 2, 2014 at 2:50 PM
2 moms liked this

I guess if they aren't "black" foods, I don't understand why people get up in arms about it since it shouldn't have anything to do with stereotyping of AA people, it's just food.

Quoting cjsmom1:

People find it offensive because those aren't "black" foods, they are typically foods that are eaten in the south. I think people are trying to get rid of the stereotypes thaat are associated with black people.


amonkeymom
by Amy on Mar. 2, 2014 at 2:51 PM
3 moms liked this

Thank you, this explanation makes more sense.  However, I don't understand, if these things have nothing to do with African Americans, but are just traditional southern fare, why are they considered to be offensive?

Quoting MonarchMom22:

The other examples you gave are considred feast days.  Like having turkey on Thanksgiving, or pancakes on Fat Tuesday.

Black History month is meant to educate students on the history of African Americans, their contributions to American life, the horror of slavery, the Civil Rights movement, and the other culturs that black people derive from.  Much of this is absent, or has been glossed over, in history class for previous generations.

Using typical southern food is not an accurate or meaningful way to educate on this topic.  It is not the food brought over with their ancestors, nor is it encompassing of their many ethnic backgrounds.  It is just an old sterotype of the South.


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