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Your kid is fat, stop denying it

Posted by on Jul. 28, 2014 at 2:10 AM
  • 30 Replies

Parents of Obese Kids Often View Them as Healthy

They're more likely to change their children's diet than encourage exercise, study finds.

 
Parents of obese children often don't view their kids as unhealthy or recognize the health consequences of excess weight or inactivity, according to a new study.

The children of the families surveyed for the new research were attending an obesity clinic at the Hasbro Children's Hospital in Providence, R.I.

"A third categorized their child's health as excellent or very good," said study researcher Dr. Kyung Rhee, now an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego.

Rhee surveyed slightly more than 200 families in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate their readiness to help their children lose weight. She found that 28 percent of the parents did not perceive their child's weight as a health concern. But experts know that childhood obesity has both immediate and long-term ill effects on health, including risks for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Thirty-one percent of the parents thought their child's health was excellent or very good.

Parents were more likely to try to improve their children's eating habits than to increase exercise, Rhee found. While 61 percent said they were trying to improve eating habits, just 41 percent said they were increasing their child's activity level.

If parents were obese, they were less likely to be helping their children change. Most of the children, 94 percent, were obese, and their pediatrician referred them to the clinic for help in slimming down. The other 6 percent were overweight.

 

If parents were obese, they were less likely to be helping their children change, the study found. 

If parents were obese, they were less likely to be helping their children change, the study found.

The study was published online recently in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Rhee said the findings are similar to a study she did in 2005, asking about parents' readiness to change their child's behavior if the child needed to lose weight.

The parents' own weight status affected how willing they were to make changes in their children's eating habits. "The parents who thought their own weight was a health problem were less likely to make changes in a child's diet," Rhee said.

She can't say why this is, because the survey did not ask. But Rhee suspects that the parents may have been discouraged by their own failed attempts at dieting.

In the study, the average age of the children and teens was about 14, but ranged from 5 to 20.

While income, race or ethnicity didn't have a bearing on whether parents were trying to improve their child's diet, income did play a role in whether parents encouraged exercise. Those who made less than $40,000 a year were less likely to encourage exercise. The survey didn't ask the reasons why.

Dr. William Muinos, director of the weight management program at Miami Children's Hospital, reviewed the findings of the study. "There is a lot of fact to this study that I experience every day [with parents]," he said.

Parents often tell Muinos their children will ''grow out'' of their weight problem, and he tells them that is hazardous thinking. Research has found that children who are obese are likely to be obese as adults, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Muinos tells parents of overweight children that starting early with a good diet and a regular physical activity is crucial. "Early intervention is key both in establishing good eating habits and exercise," he said.

 

by on Jul. 28, 2014 at 2:10 AM
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Replies (1-10):
cjsmom1
by Silver Member on Jul. 28, 2014 at 2:12 AM

Teaching kids about a healthy lifestyle starts at home. Ds is a healthy weight for his height, but it's something I keep an eye on since my side of the family has weight issues. He plays sports year round and is very active. He does eat more junk then I care to admit, but he eats almost any fruit and vegetable.

People don't want to hear that their choices are setting their kids up for a lifetime of medical issues and weight struggles.

mysticalmalissa
by Silver Member on Jul. 28, 2014 at 4:14 AM

I don't see many kids that arent over weight in todays world.

BradleysMom2014
by on Jul. 28, 2014 at 4:20 AM

My DH was overweight growing up (20 IBS not bad but his body type made him look pudgy)

His mom makes meals that would kill a goat and she wonders why FIL's doctor is concerned about his health. the woman bitches about having to make two veggies for dinner

I make a meat two veggies and some fruit for dinner for goodness sake!

She tried to make comments because DH lost weight when I started cooking, but it was because I don't slather everything in grease and he eats his veggies now -.-

cjsmom1
by Silver Member on Jul. 28, 2014 at 6:49 AM

I see a decent amount of kids that aren't. I have noticed that more and more kids are obese though.

Quoting mysticalmalissa:

I don't see many kids that arent over weight in todays world.

 

cjsmom1
by Silver Member on Jul. 28, 2014 at 6:52 AM

My ex's mom has come to visit and checked to make sure I had fruits and veggies for ds. Which I did, but it was still kind of funny that she checked. My ex will only eat one or two veggies they must be prepared a certain way and he weighs 142 lbs, he's 5'11

Quoting BradleysMom2014:

My DH was overweight growing up (20 IBS not bad but his body type made him look pudgy)

His mom makes meals that would kill a goat and she wonders why FIL's doctor is concerned about his health. the woman bitches about having to make two veggies for dinner

I make a meat two veggies and some fruit for dinner for goodness sake!

She tried to make comments because DH lost weight when I started cooking, but it was because I don't slather everything in grease and he eats his veggies now -.-

 

mcginnisc
by Member on Jul. 28, 2014 at 6:57 AM

Mine can't gain an ounce....I wish I had their metabolism! LOL 

I have to fight them tooth and nail to eat healthy foods...especially my youngest. They both loathe veggies and my youngest won't even drink smoothies. I keep hoping she will start to like them as Dh and I both love veggies. 


Claire


" I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me." Philippians 4:13 

BradleysMom2014
by on Jul. 28, 2014 at 6:59 AM

 DH went from grease to bachelor food to my food

which I am NOT the most healthiest cook, by all means...

It's not uncommon for me to bake some chicken in the oven covered in BBQ sauce and throw some frozen veggies on the stove and cut up a apple or two and be done for the night

actually, that's basically what I do. Meat, two veggies, some type of fruit (I love watermelon and keep 2-3 gallon bags in my fridge since I can eat a gallon bag by myself in a day ) so yeah

Quoting cjsmom1:

My ex's mom has come to visit and checked to make sure I had fruits and veggies for ds. Which I did, but it was still kind of funny that she checked. My ex will only eat one or two veggies they must be prepared a certain way and he weighs 142 lbs, he's 5'11

Quoting BradleysMom2014:

My DH was overweight growing up (20 IBS not bad but his body type made him look pudgy)

His mom makes meals that would kill a goat and she wonders why FIL's doctor is concerned about his health. the woman bitches about having to make two veggies for dinner

I make a meat two veggies and some fruit for dinner for goodness sake!

She tried to make comments because DH lost weight when I started cooking, but it was because I don't slather everything in grease and he eats his veggies now -.-

 

 

cc5112
by on Jul. 28, 2014 at 7:16 AM

I don't see that many kids that are overweight. The few I do see are very overweght , though. 

DH and I do have a healthy diet. DS still doesn't care for dark greens unless I blanch, puree and mix it into his pasta meal( it makes it green lol!).  He particularly likes pureed mixed dark greens in his mac and cheese and doesn't care to eat it at ome if it's not green :) He's also adventurous and will try the food I serve at the dinner table. However, he still does not like meat - any meat ( turkey beef chicken fish, etc). On ocassion, he'll eat an egg. So I have to be creative about his protein intake ( like quinoa, pasta, soy, dair, etc).

Noni2319
by Chrissy on Jul. 28, 2014 at 7:55 AM
This is such a huge issue. I know people that are in denial about this. I had a friend ask for my pediatricians info because she was so mad at her doctor. I decided to risk it when we all went to the pool and point out her dr was right. I was worried she'd stop talking to me, but her daughter was huge and her son I was guessing at borderline obese. It really is a huge problem and I can't believe how many people are in denial about it.
Noni2319
by Chrissy on Jul. 28, 2014 at 8:00 AM
My youngest isn't a big fan of meat. Fortunately he's pretty good about everything else.

Quoting cc5112:

I don't see that many kids that are overweight. The few I do see are very overweght , though. 

DH and I do have a healthy diet. DS still doesn't care for dark greens unless I blanch, puree and mix it into his pasta meal( it makes it green lol!).  He particularly likes pureed mixed dark greens in his mac and cheese and doesn't care to eat it at ome if it's not green :) He's also adventurous and will try the food I serve at the dinner table. However, he still does not like meat - any meat ( turkey beef chicken fish, etc). On ocassion, he'll eat an egg. So I have to be creative about his protein intake ( like quinoa, pasta, soy, dair, etc).

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