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Sure, lets bring Ebola to the US....

Posted by on Aug. 4, 2014 at 6:09 AM
  • 19 Replies

How do you all feel about the two patients being brought back to the US for treatment of Ebola?

I have mixed feelings. On one hand I feel sorry for the two that are sick, but thats as far as that goes for me.

On the other hand, I dont want them and their illness brought back to the states.  Why cant the small medical team that will be treating them be sent over to Africa to tend to them, then bring them home.





....I'm not awake enough to go hunt a link for details, its all over national news this morning,google is your friend....and yes I am aware that I sound cold hearted, blame it on the three hot flashes I've had already today. :/

by on Aug. 4, 2014 at 6:09 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Thelmama
by Thelma on Aug. 4, 2014 at 7:20 AM

I too have mixed feelins. They will get well quicker and do better near family, even if they can't touch family. The risk for human error is huge when it comes to caring for someone so sick. They have them quarantined, in special suits, in special air locked rooms and the like, but all it takes is one person making a mistake.  I am not afraid per se, but like you think until they reach a certain stage of illness could be cared for, as you said a special team. 

The USA does have better medical faciities and equipment, though, so yeah it's a toss up.

FrankMamma
by Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 9:25 AM

I have mixed feellings as well. I know if it were me, I'd be glad my country welcomed me back for treatment. He is very well contained there though and they are taking every precaution they know of, from what I heard. Here is a link from Wikipedia on the virus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebola_virus_disease there was a lot of confusion as to what the disease really is in my area, so I looked it up. It has a very short incubation period and symptoms come on hard and fast, so hopefully people would be smart enough to get themselves to a doctor.

cc5112
by on Aug. 4, 2014 at 10:11 AM
2 moms liked this

I think that the idea of the disease arriving in our country is scary. It is another reminder that we are a global community and we cannot just turn a blind eye to what is happening in the rest of the world. 

That said, I'm glad that both people were brought back to get the medical care they need. The hospital they are getting treated at is specialized in treating Ebola and is working with the CDC. The staff is highly trained as well. The facility where the 2 patients are being treated is quarantined, which probably includes some knid of laminar air flow to prevent/reduce the incidence of the virus from becoming airborne through couching and sneezing .... 

As for a team to be sent out to treat them in Africa nstead of in the US? Well, they probably don't want to go to Africa to do so. Like all of us, they have families and a life outside their work. Going to Africa and treating the infected patients would probably not be ideal as resources  ( labs, infusion pumps, monitors, quarantine facilities with air filters, etc) are not readily available. 

An infected person has a 90% chance of dieing from the disease. Early treatment is crucial to increase the 10% chance of survival. One of the physicians treating the 2 patients said that their job was to keep them breathing and maintain proper organ function as best possible long enough for the body to fight the virus. 

The patient already here, a physician who volunteered to help in the Liberian outbreak, visited with family behind a glass wall and was able to walk. The second patient, a hygienist is scheduled to arrive this week.

I hope both patients survive and are reunited with their families soon. 

Bresmom13
by Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 10:34 AM

 I agree, mixed feelings. My biggest thought was that it was THEIR decision to stay over there even though they knew (the news even stated the guy told his parents that he was choosing to stay). I think they are only bringing the Female back, but one person can spread it just as much as two.

143myboys9496
by Suzzanne on Aug. 4, 2014 at 11:22 AM

I'm also on the fence. While the proper precautions seem to be taking place, there is also the human factor for error. 

As far as treatment goes, technology wise these patients are better served here in America. 

It's not going to be cheap to treat these patients. Don't be surprised if (at least in Atlanta) there's a blood or FFP shortage.

mysticalmalissa
by Silver Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 3:44 PM

The doctor (male) was brought back yesterday, he was able to walk into the hospital. The female is supposed to arrive today, I believe.

Quoting Bresmom13:

 I agree, mixed feelings. My biggest thought was that it was THEIR decision to stay over there even though they knew (the news even stated the guy told his parents that he was choosing to stay). I think they are only bringing the Female back, but one person can spread it just as much as two.


Bresmom13
by Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 3:48 PM

 

Quoting mysticalmalissa:

The doctor (male) was brought back yesterday, he was able to walk into the hospital. The female is supposed to arrive today, I believe.

Quoting Bresmom13:

 I agree, mixed feelings. My biggest thought was that it was THEIR decision to stay over there even though they knew (the news even stated the guy told his parents that he was choosing to stay). I think they are only bringing the Female back, but one person can spread it just as much as two.

 Its hilarious how the news reports things. At one time I heard he died from it. Then they were talking about the one vile of serum and the guy told them to give it to the woman. Hmmm he lives.... lol Thanks for the update. I still say if they choose to stay there and contaminate themselves they shouldnt come back till they are cleared from having it. My opinion

mysticalmalissa
by Silver Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 3:53 PM

Not very specialized since these two are the first two humans that will be treated by this staff and at this facility. They are specialized in infectious care.

I'm glad they are designed for such treatment, but it only takes one ticking timebomb of a nut job to get it out and spread it. That is my biggest fear.

Quoting cc5112:

I think that the idea of the disease arriving in our country is scary. It is another reminder that we are a global community and we cannot just turn a blind eye to what is happening in the rest of the world. 

That said, I'm glad that both people were brought back to get the medical care they need. The hospital they are getting treated at is specialized in treating Ebola and is working with the CDC. The staff is highly trained as well. The facility where the 2 patients are being treated is quarantined, which probably includes some knid of laminar air flow to prevent/reduce the incidence of the virus from becoming airborne through couching and sneezing .... 

As for a team to be sent out to treat them in Africa nstead of in the US? Well, they probably don't want to go to Africa to do so. Like all of us, they have families and a life outside their work. Going to Africa and treating the infected patients would probably not be ideal as resources  ( labs, infusion pumps, monitors, quarantine facilities with air filters, etc) are not readily available. 

An infected person has a 90% chance of dieing from the disease. Early treatment is crucial to increase the 10% chance of survival. One of the physicians treating the 2 patients said that their job was to keep them breathing and maintain proper organ function as best possible long enough for the body to fight the virus. 

The patient already here, a physician who volunteered to help in the Liberian outbreak, visited with family behind a glass wall and was able to walk. The second patient, a hygienist is scheduled to arrive this week.

I hope both patients survive and are reunited with their families soon. 


mysticalmalissa
by Silver Member on Aug. 4, 2014 at 3:55 PM


Quoting Bresmom13:

 

Quoting mysticalmalissa:

The doctor (male) was brought back yesterday, he was able to walk into the hospital. The female is supposed to arrive today, I believe.

Quoting Bresmom13:

 I agree, mixed feelings. My biggest thought was that it was THEIR decision to stay over there even though they knew (the news even stated the guy told his parents that he was choosing to stay). I think they are only bringing the Female back, but one person can spread it just as much as two.

 Its hilarious how the news reports things. At one time I heard he died from it. Then they were talking about the one vile of serum and the guy told them to give it to the woman. Hmmm he lives.... lol Thanks for the update. I still say if they choose to stay there and contaminate themselves they shouldnt come back till they are cleared from having it. My opinion

There was a 3rd person, he did pass away. 

cc5112
by on Aug. 4, 2014 at 5:41 PM

I know what you mean. There's not just the human error factor, but the human idiot factor as well. 

I think that the fact that the staff at Emory has been training for a year on how to treat Ebola infected  patients is still better than no training at all.  That they received 1 patient and soon another that they know is infected is better than someone just dropping into the ED with Ebola like symptoms and exposing so many more people before it is determined that it is in fact Ebola. 

People from all over the world come and go from Africa into our country and not necessarily through a direct route. 

I'm scared as much as anyone else that there could be others already here or about to land here who are incubating the virus ( up to 21 days) and no one knows, not even the infected person, that they are infected and go about there business possibly spreading it ( through bodily fluid contact). 

Quoting mysticalmalissa:

Not very specialized since these two are the first two humans that will be treated by this staff and at this facility. They are specialized in infectious care.

I'm glad they are designed for such treatment, but it only takes one ticking timebomb of a nut job to get it out and spread it. That is my biggest fear.

Quoting cc5112:

I think that the idea of the disease arriving in our country is scary. It is another reminder that we are a global community and we cannot just turn a blind eye to what is happening in the rest of the world. 

That said, I'm glad that both people were brought back to get the medical care they need. The hospital they are getting treated at is specialized in treating Ebola and is working with the CDC. The staff is highly trained as well. The facility where the 2 patients are being treated is quarantined, which probably includes some knid of laminar air flow to prevent/reduce the incidence of the virus from becoming airborne through couching and sneezing .... 

As for a team to be sent out to treat them in Africa nstead of in the US? Well, they probably don't want to go to Africa to do so. Like all of us, they have families and a life outside their work. Going to Africa and treating the infected patients would probably not be ideal as resources  ( labs, infusion pumps, monitors, quarantine facilities with air filters, etc) are not readily available. 

An infected person has a 90% chance of dieing from the disease. Early treatment is crucial to increase the 10% chance of survival. One of the physicians treating the 2 patients said that their job was to keep them breathing and maintain proper organ function as best possible long enough for the body to fight the virus. 

The patient already here, a physician who volunteered to help in the Liberian outbreak, visited with family behind a glass wall and was able to walk. The second patient, a hygienist is scheduled to arrive this week.

I hope both patients survive and are reunited with their families soon. 


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