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OT a bit...where were you 9/11? And do your kids ask about it?

Posted by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 11:28 AM
  • 21 Replies

What are your memories of 911 and the days after?  Do your kids ask about it at all?  Do they even know much about it?

My SDs are teens now but were toddlers at the time.  They have virtually zero memory.  For them, it's just something they've read about in school a little bit.  Yet their entire lives, we've essentially been at war as a result. That seems NORMAL to them.  It's crazy.  I was born after Vietnam.  So until the first Gulf War, there was never anything "big" that directly affected us here in the US.  I remember lots of hijackings in the 80's, embassy bombings, etc.  But then there was the first Gulf War and we were essentially in and out.  Gave us a real sense of being so militarily superior that when Afghanistan and Iraq came on the scene, I couldn't have predicted we'd still be there...so many years later.



by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 11:28 AM
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Replies (1-10):
progressandjoy
by Silver Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 11:59 AM

I was in fourth grade. Our teachers didn’t say anything, but most of us could sense the tension. My mom picked me up early for a dentist appointment and asked me if I knew what happened. She then explained that some people had attacked our country and many people were killed.

 

When we got to the dentist office, all the tvs were covering the news. The lady doing my appointment asked if I wanted to watch cartoons, but I remember feeling that what was one the news was much more important than cartoons. We all sat in the dentist office watching the news. Right after she started cleaning my teeth, we heard the breaking news about the fourth plane that crashed.

twinklebites
by Bronze Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:03 PM

I was in the Persian Gulf we were actually due to head home on the 12th but our Deployment was left open ended we came back about 5 weeks later then planned , I was surreal for me it was evening time for us and it j,ust didn't look real ! I know that sounds weird but being aboard a ship we only got limited coverage, I really couldn't help but think/hope It was "War of The Worlds "  type thing.

LoveMy2x4
by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:05 PM

I was 16 and in gym class. The principle came over the PA system to let us all know what happened and kept us updated through out the day. We ended up leaving school early (I live on Long Island) and school was closed the next day. My friends father was FDNY and his body still has never been found. 

The day we went back to school, the principle came over the PA again shouting, "EVACUATE THE SCHOOL IMMEDIATELY! EVACUATE THE SCHOOL IMMEDIATELY!" Turns out one of our boilers blew. But for the next 2 years of school, anytime the PA system went off, every kid jumped and faces turned white. 

Birdseed
by Platinum Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I was wrapping up my shift as a volunteer in the veterinary clinic on base in Aviano, Italy.  I was swiffering.  I remember because swiffers had just come out and I thought they were pretty cool.  Anyway, one of the receptionists came back and said, "Some idiot just flew his cessna into the World Trade Center!"  We tried to get online and watch but pretty soon, the internet was clogged and useless.

My then fiance pulled up, sirens started going off, we all had our chem gear and we were to get off base ASAP.

We only got one news station and they were playing the Today show which was covering the events.  Several of our friends came over to watch as we had one of the only operational TVs.  I could not get ahold of family back in the states including several friends who lived in NYC and worked in the Trade Center at the time. (they all survived)

When I finally DID get a hold of my mom, she told me stories of gas prices being hiked, craziness all over. 

I had to get on a plane Sept 13--no planes over the US were flying yet and we were advised not to let anyone know we were American. I remember doing my security interview at Schipol in very broken Italian and some French.  

When I returned to the US in Oct, after being evac'd due to safety issues in Italy (I had people protesting in my yard every day...peacefully at that point, but scary when you're home alone and we're having to bomb check our car, lots of threats due to getting ready to go into Afghanistan and being US military), I came home to a different world.

My car had been stored in Chicago while I was away.  I remember people honking at me and flipping me off on the drive from Chicago to IA (home) because I didn't have a flag sticker, magnet or actual flag on my car.  Couldn't find one anywhere anyway.  All sold out.

I was amazed at the country I came home to.


Birdseed
by Platinum Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:12 PM



Quoting twinklebites:

we only got limited coverage, I really couldn't help but think/hope It was "War of The Worlds "  type thing.


TOTALLY get that.  It felt like that for us too.  Like we were on a different planet or something.

LyndaLoo78
by Skeletor on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:22 PM

At the time I was living in Florida, my boyfriend, whom I lived with, was a Brooklyn boy born and raised.  I was working 4 10 hour shifts per week, starting in the afternoon and ending at the earliest 11PM, so I was asleep.  He called and woke me up, obviously freaking out.  There was additional anxiety associated, because his aunt, uncle, and cousins all worked directly in or at the buildings surrounding WTC.  I am thankful that they were all fine, but that day and the several that followed were extremely difficult.

Yes my children ask about 9/11, very thoughtful and intelligent questions.  They have seen the metal from the towers that have been placed at local townships, they have seen the local memorials.  I think this autumn I will take them directly to the 9/11 Memorial in NYC.  

DDDaysh
by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:26 PM

I think about that with DS.  His older sister was only a few months old when this happened and DS wasn't even conceived yet!  We have been at war for his entire life.  

When I was his age, we were in the middle of Desert Shield/Storm.  I remember my uncle shipping out.  I remember war being a new thing and scary.  But DS, well, it's all he's ever known, and he's not a baby anymore.  He's a kid that has grown up thinking our country being at war is NORMAL.  You have to wonder what that is going to do to this generation?  And that's our kids, living safe over hear where the war is only grown ups going off to another land to fight, and stories on the news.  You have to wonder even more about the generations of kids growing up in the countries where the war is ever present.  How are they even going to understand the idea of NOT having people shooting outside?  It's so sad.  

He's asked about 9-11 before.  We've talked about it a few times.  He knows that I was alone in my apartment watching the news before I had to go teach a class, on the phone with my father staring in shock at the live feed of the report about the first plane while the second plane flew into the tower in the background.  He also has asked questions about why they did it, and why we did what we did against it.  

We've also recently discussed what happened in Syria.  He's only in 4th grade, so his understanding of international relations is obviously primative, but he's beginning to ask more and more questions.  He's beginning to understand the frustration of having to choose between two evils, namely going to war or not going to war and letting bad things continue to happen in other places.  I think that's making this particular 9-11 more intense for him, because he's old enough to process more than just "us good/them bad" now.  

DDDaysh
by on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:39 PM

DS wants to go to New York, and wants to see the memorial (and the Statue of Liberty, and the Natural History museum).  I'm SO scared to take him by myself though, lol, so he'll probably have to wait until he's older.  

Quoting LyndaLoo78:

At the time I was living in Florida, my boyfriend, whom I lived with, was a Brooklyn boy born and raised.  I was working 4 10 hour shifts per week, starting in the afternoon and ending at the earliest 11PM, so I was asleep.  He called and woke me up, obviously freaking out.  There was additional anxiety associated, because his aunt, uncle, and cousins all worked directly in or at the buildings surrounding WTC.  I am thankful that they were all fine, but that day and the several that followed were extremely difficult.

Yes my children ask about 9/11, very thoughtful and intelligent questions.  They have seen the metal from the towers that have been placed at local townships, they have seen the local memorials.  I think this autumn I will take them directly to the 9/11 Memorial in NYC.  


Birdseed
by Platinum Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:44 PM

My SDs know that my brother and SIL are stationed overseas and have done a few tours in Iraq.  I think they really first "got it" about the war when DH and I went to DC for the Medal of Honor ceremony for my "other brother".  Up til then, they really didn't quite realize what was going on.  SD15 asked to read his book but then found some other interests this summer.  I think it must be weird as a kid to see all of the "fallout" from 911 but not remember or know how it was.

I would like to go to the memorial in NYC.  But just driving past the Pentagon and seeing the different colored parts of the building due to the rebuild...I mean, that's pretty touching when you see it, even on a regular basis.


AmericanDream
by Gold Member on Sep. 11, 2013 at 12:58 PM

It was my Sophomore year.  I was on my way between classes and they hearded us all into the cafeteria or gym.  It was bad.  Lots of tears. Lots of turmoil and panic.  I lived about 4 hours from DC at the time and there were many people who had parents, grandparents, family, friends...etc... who worked in or near the Pentagon or WTC.  Living in the military epicenter of the East coast also became terrifying for a while.  I lived near the Naval Air Station ... jets were flying like crazy afterwards and every time you could see panic in peoples' eyes.  What if that's not us?  It was a double edged sword.  Yeah... we were protected by all the bases around, but wouldn't that also make us a great target?

Later I remember the crying when war was declared and my peers watched their fathers, brothers, uncles, cousins, mothers, sisters sent to fight a war, not knowing if they'd ever see them again. 


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