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Have you been physically assaulted by your stepchilden?

Posted by on May. 4, 2014 at 10:38 AM
  • 92 Replies

My stepson has physically assaulted me several times. I was wondering if other stepmoms have experienced this. Nobody seems to talk about it.

More Info: After reading the following blog post I, like the author, was curious if a lot of stepmoms are encountering this, but just not talking about it. I'm not looking for advise. I was looking to discuss the issue. FYI -My situation is already resolved. After years of verbal and psychical abuse from my adult stepson, he is no longer welcome in my home. My husband does continue to have a relationship with him. Just not at our house. We sent SS to a mental hospital for a psych evaluation. He was in therapy for many years after. He also took medication. He was still violent toward me and other people with no remorse. So now he is not a part of my life. So please stop posting about me being a troll or telling me to call police or blaming me & husband for doing nothing. We did what we felt best at the time. Also, some people feel that this is not a stepmom issue and should be in the domestic violence group. That's fine if you feel that way. However, I am leaving this post here because I want to hear from stepmoms specifically.

Wednesday Martin

Official Blog for the Author of Stepmonster

Push Comes to Shove: When Stepchildren Get Violent

While researching my book Stepmonster, I interviewed a number of women from all walks of life who described being on the receiving end of aggressive and even violent behavior from teenage and young adult stepchildren. They described not just nasty verbal attacks but shoves, pushes, and in more than one cases, slaps and punches, usually in the context of a “showdown” when the stepmother demanded better treatment or an end to disrespectful behavior, asserting herself as an adult authority in the household. In many instances, the woman’s husband or partner was actually in the home (but not in the room) when her stepchild got physical with her. These women were not describing protracted altercations, and were not in serial heated disputes with stepchildren; nor had anyone who described it to me ever been physically violent with a stepchild or child herself. In short, none of these women had a history of being physically violent or in physically violent relationships. And none of them were “mixing it up” with stepkids on a regular basis in any way or returning the shoves, pushes, and more. These blows came out of the blue, in a charged situation, shocking and humiliating them.

It is shocking to think of being profoundly vulnerable in your own home, but I was not entirely taken aback by this finding, and I suspect many women with stepkids share my sense of understanding, on an intuitive level, how such scenarios might unfold. Indeed, the very facts of stepfamily life suggest that episodic physical violence against stepmothers might be much more common than we think. This is because even those stepfamilies that will end up feeling healthy and normal are frequently, at some point, a breeding ground for the kind of contentious and charged emotions that can erupt physically, combined with a permissive parenting style that may well fail to prevent it. Now add in another all too common reality–a mother who communicates to her kids, explicitly or implicitly, that stepmom should be treated badly–and you have a tinderbox ready, in some cases, to explode. Throw into the mix an angry, resentful teenage or young adult stepchild testing the limits, and it is easy to see how this wire gets tripped.

But how often does it happen? If the emails I have been receiving from women with stepchildren every day since the publication of my book in early May, plus the findings of stepmother authors like Cherie Burns are any indiction, all too often. When we control for the fact that this is the kind of information one wouldn’t not eagerly disclose and may keep secret, the number of incidents I have been told of is very significant.

So then why don’t we hear about it? Why isn’t it in the headlines and on our lips? Why aren’t we talking about it to our counsellors, our husbands, our friends over coffee? Because stepmothers are steeped in a mindset of self-blame and shame with regard to anything that might be perceived as a failure on the stepfamily front. We all know the formula: “If there are problems in the stepfamily, it’s stepmom’s fault. If she were nice to those kids, they’d warm right up to her.” The women I interviewed and who emailed me told me, in many cases, that they hadn’t even told their husbands about the incidents, out of fear of being blamed or accused of exaggerating. They also told me they feared being judged responsible (“You’re the adult. What did you do to make him/her want to hit you?”) by friends, clergy, and even their therapists when it came to the incidents of their stepchildren getting physical with them!

Let’s be clear: physical violence in the household is never okay, and your duty as a stepmother does not ever extend into the territory of feeling or being physically menaced or attacked in your home. We’re not talking about a four year old who lashes out during a tantrum, or a five-year-old who hits on the playground and in the house out of frustration. We’re talking about teens and young adults who should and do know better than to strike an adult. They also know that they can probably get away with it, if stepmom is firmly on the outside of the family structure, if she and dad aren’t a team, if there’s a history of the stepchild being able to manipulate his or her parent, or play parent and stepparent off one another.

Without more research on stepmother families (the three most recent longitudinal studies have focused, as most stepfamily research does, on stepfather families), we will not know the extent of this problem. And that means we can’t help these women with stepkids who lash out physically. Which leads to more stepmaternal burnout and more partnerships and families dissolving.

If you are a woman with stepchildren who has experienced physical violence in your household at the hands of your stepchild or adult stepchild, or know someone who is, I would like to hear from you for research purposes. My email is wednesday@wednesdaymartin.com. I also encourage you to find support so that you can feel and be safe in your home.

by on May. 4, 2014 at 10:38 AM
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Replies (1-10):
oldproatthis
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 10:46 AM
1 mom liked this

No, my MSS has been physical with his BM and her SO however...major issues in that house...he has underlying ADHD and ODD we've come to find out...so her chaotic house does not help...

oldproatthis
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 10:50 AM
1 mom liked this

How old is he. What were the circumstances?

newwife1
by Silver Member on May. 4, 2014 at 10:53 AM
1 mom liked this

Yep.

My SS has thrown the remote at my head and screamed, "Change the channel". He has thrown water bottles at my head and other objects while screaming orders at me.

I'm not allowed to tell him to stop throwing things or to ask for stuff like a normal human being, I'm ONLY the stepmom and therefore nothing.


Closet_Case
by Member on May. 4, 2014 at 10:54 AM
Nope, closest physical contact we've had is if she hugs me at drop offs
KareninTampa
by on May. 4, 2014 at 11:03 AM


Quoting oldproatthis:

How old is he. What were the circumstances?

He is an adult now and for my own protection he is not allowed in my home. The physical assaults always occured when I was alone with him. They were not in reaction to a fight or heated discussion, because I never fought with him. The attacks came out of the blue and caught me completely off guard. When he attacks me he laughs. I think he may be a sociopath. The final straw was when he sexually assaulted me.

Dulcemama5
by Member on May. 4, 2014 at 11:14 AM
2 moms liked this
Yes the ysd physically attacked me when i got after her for calling my then 4 yo daughter a effing c**t called the cops had her arrested and she hasnt been allowed back to my home since
KareninTampa
by on May. 4, 2014 at 11:18 AM

Does he do this in front of his father, or just when he is alone with you? My SS always acts normal when others are in the room then becomes violent when alone with me.

Quoting newwife1:

Yep.

My SS has thrown the remote at my head and screamed, "Change the channel". He has thrown water bottles at my head and other objects while screaming orders at me.

I'm not allowed to tell him to stop throwing things or to ask for stuff like a normal human being, I'm ONLY the stepmom and therefore nothing.



KareninTampa
by on May. 4, 2014 at 11:19 AM

I wish I had called the police when it happened to me. You did the right thing. Now there is a written record of her violence. I live in fear that my SS may try to hurt me again.

Quoting Dulcemama5: Yes the ysd physically attacked me when i got after her for calling my then 4 yo daughter a effing c**t called the cops had her arrested and she hasnt been allowed back to my home since


Dulcemama5
by Member on May. 4, 2014 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this
Honestly i should have called sooner but let other instances slide but when she went after my 4 yo all bets were off

Quoting KareninTampa:

I wish I had called the police when it happened to me. You did the right thing. Now there is a written record of her violence. I live in fear that my SS may try to hurt me again.

Quoting Dulcemama5: Yes the ysd physically attacked me when i got after her for calling my then 4 yo daughter a effing c**t called the cops had her arrested and she hasnt been allowed back to my home since

justcyarra
by Brandi on May. 4, 2014 at 11:27 AM
1 mom liked this
My sd (14 at the time) kicked me in the stomach, she is no longer welcome in our home. She is 16 now and I haven't seen her since.
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