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According to Wiki...

Posted by on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:17 PM
  • 32 Replies

The origins of baby mama.  

The term originated in Jamaican Creole as "baby-mother" (pronounced [ˈbebi ˈmada]), with the first printed usage appearing in the Kingston newspaperThe Daily Gleaner in 1966.[1][2] 


The term "baby-mother" in Jamaica is most often used to describe any pregnant woman or any woman with a young child. For example on a crowded bus you may be admonished to give the "baby-mother" a seat. However in this case no judgement is being made about her marital status and literally means "the mother of the child".

by on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:17 PM
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pdxmum
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:20 PM

Doing too much laundry so my curiosity got the better of me and I have been researching "outside child". This is from a Jamaican newspaper:

Immigration Matters - I Want My Outside Child To Join Me

Published: Tuesday | June 15, 20100 Comments

Dear Mrs Walker-Huntington,

I had a child out of wedlock many years ago. She is now about 37 years old. I had concealed this from my wife initially but when the child was around 14 years old, I bit the bullet and told my wife of my infidelity. I was terrified my wife was going to divorce me but decided whatever the outcome was, it was a chance I had to take. I told her I was ashamed and remorseful of my deed. It took her some counselling to get over the affair but she came around and forgave me. Before, I had to be clandestine in giving support for my daughter but after telling my wife, I could openly support my child's living expenses as well as her schooling. I

 find my wife has shown as much love to my daughter as our children. Sometime in 1998, my wife even suggested we give our house in Jamaica to my daughter. I became a US citizen in 1995 and on my application for citizenship, I declared my outside child as one of my children. In trying to protect my reputation, the mother of the child did not put my name as the father on the birth certificate. My daughter is a very wonderful young lady and when she was getting married, I told her to tell her husband-to-be who her father was. So, my name was recorded on her wedding certificate. The problem is, I would like to help her to come to the US because I want her to be close to me. Can I file an application for her and her family to get a permanent visa to the States? Would the authorities consider such application and if so, how long would it take?

pdxmum
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:24 PM

Another piece from the Jamaican Observer:

Dear Mrs. Macaulay,

My parents have been married for many years and now I am an adult. Two years ago I found out that my father has an outside child who is a young adult, who has lately produced a child also -- his grandchild.

The problem is, it is suspected that up until last year he was paying his child's tuition and maintenance. Additionally, it is suspected that he may have several other children under the age of 18 with another woman. I have asked him several times about the other children and he denies it, but there is clear evidence to the contrary.

Both my parents have a shared property (joint tenancy) and my father refuses to make a will.

In the event that he dies, will the mother of these children be able to put forward a claim regarding the house or insurance to which my mother is beneficiary? Is there anything she can do from now to prevent or mitigate such circumstances? Will his outside adult child also be able to make a claim, or the grandchild?

pdxmum
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:29 PM

A comment from the above article:

The problem with "outside" children/grandchildren is the stigma attached to their existence. They are often treated with scorn and disdain due to selfish motivation. The "outsiders" are no more responsible for their predicament than the "insiders" are for theirs. If the estate aka "dead lef" is what is motivating you to make sure they don't partake in any of it, then feast at the table of greed and gluttony. It's your belly!

pdxmum
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:35 PM

And then there is this, a book about families in various cultures and a section about Jamaica and the prevalance of outside children.

Can't make it clicky.

https://books.google.com/books?id=pAXFBAAAQBAJ&pg=PA343&lpg=PA343&dq=outside+child+used+in+jamaica&source=bl&ots=-e58vhqqUw&sig=9pyUbE85w41-1gYzD5SRlfjwO04&hl=en&sa=X&ei=U16LVNHvE4-0ogTLkYLgCA&ved=0CCoQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=outside%20child%20used%20in%20jamaica&f=false


pdxmum
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:37 PM

There were other articles.  My conclusion is that it is a common term in Jamaica identifying children born to someone other than your spouse while married, the product of an affair.  There is a negative stigma around the word.  And there are lots of them.

jules2boys
by Platinum Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:53 PM
1 mom liked this

I think this makes it clicky.

Quoting pdxmum:

And then there is this, a book about families in various cultures and a section about Jamaica and the prevalance of outside children.

Can't make it clicky.

https://books.google.com/books?id=pAXFBAAAQBAJ&pg=PA343&lpg=PA343&dq=outside+child+used+in+jamaica&source=bl&ots=-e58vhqqUw&sig=9pyUbE85w41-1gYzD5SRlfjwO04&hl=en&sa=X&ei=U16LVNHvE4-0ogTLkYLgCA&ved=0CCoQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=outside%20child%20used%20in%20jamaica&f=false



KarmaBusDriver
by ChiefBottleWasher on Dec. 12, 2014 at 4:57 PM

Interesting to know the origin, I learned something new today:)

with a lot of words though they get twisted to be used as a derogatory insult. Like bitch as an example.

Quoting pdxmum:

There were other articles.  My conclusion is that it is a common term in Jamaica identifying children born to someone other than your spouse while married, the product of an affair.  There is a negative stigma around the word.  And there are lots of them.


whatIknownow
by on Dec. 12, 2014 at 5:09 PM
1 mom liked this

So her SS is not an outside child. He is just her husband's firstborn.

britney678
by Silver Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 5:27 PM
1 mom liked this
Sounds like it. Sounds like an outside child is one born outside a marriage. A bastard. In her case, there was no marriage at the time for him to be born outside of.

Quoting whatIknownow:

So her SS is not an outside child. He is just her husband's firstborn.

leegirl_jm
by Ruby Member on Dec. 12, 2014 at 6:08 PM

What is your point? SS is still my husband's child born outside of wedlock and as DH has only one marriage, he was born outside of that marriage. 

There are legal implications to a child being treated as a child of the family as this article by an attorney explained.

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20120423/flair/flair4.html

Does My Husband Take My Child/Children After Marriage?

Published: Monday | April 23, 20122 Comments

Deborah Dowding
Deborah Dowding

The question has been posed whether or not our spouse takes on our child born prior to our union.

The question has increased significance if the parties are divorcing and those are questions that must be addressed in the petition.

In order to establish who is a "child of the family", we must first look to section 2 of the Matrimonial Causes Act, under the Interpretation section which defines:

"relevant child means a child who is:

(a) a child of both parties to the marriage in question; or

(b) a child of one party to the marriage who has been accepted as one of the family by the other party ...".

The term is also used in the more recent legislation of the 2005 Maintenance Act, where the term is used in section 8(3)(c) which states:

"(3) For the purposes of this act, a person is the parent of the child if:

(c) the person is a party to a marriage or cohabitation and accepts as one of the family a child of the other party to the marriage or cohabitation.".

It is submitted that the key word is acceptance, since our act still maintains and uses the word 'accepted', while the English Act uses the word 'treated'. There is a fundamental difference between these two words, and when one looks at the Concise Oxford Dictionary's definition of the word 'accept' means:

"1. consent to receive (something offered).

2. regard favourably or with approval.

3. believe to be valid or correct

4. take on (a responsibility or liability); tolerate or submit to."

While the word 'treated' means:

"behave towards or deal with in a certain way."

Most of the 'acceptance' authorities seem to point to that "... in law there cannot be an acceptance of children into the family unless both parties agree".

The foregoing is highlighted in the case of Dixon v Dixon where it was held that there could not be acceptance of a child of the family without some mutual arrangement between the spouses and that mutual arrangement must be an arrangement that the child should be treated by both spouses as the child of both.

This case poses a fundamental question that any court will ask itself when faced with the question of acceptance of any child as a child of the family which is "... did the parties have a mutual arrangement ...".

In two decisions of our Supreme Court, the court sought to embrace the importance of mutual arrangement to demonstrate acceptance of the child in the family. Further, it laid done two important principles for consideration:

1) The onus of proof falls to the parent alleging acceptance.

2) The role of the natural/biological parent.

What the findings of the court should indicate to us is that it is important to have the discussions with our spouses about whether their children or ours will be accepted as children of our family.

Deborah Dowding is an attorney-at-law with the firm Nunes, Scholefield, DeLeon& Co. Send feedback and questions to lawsofeve@yahoo.com or lifestyle@gleanerjm.com.

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