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Student Melting Pot?

Posted by on Sep. 2, 2011 at 11:56 AM
  • 15 Replies

Hot Button Issues in Education Today: Inclusion

By Judy Moland

The concept of "full inclusion" calls for teaching all students in regular classrooms, including those with special needs. It is a subject that perennially prompts fierce debate.

Federal special education law states that "to the maximum extent appropriate," children with special needs should be educated with peers who don't have special needs in "the least restrictive environment possible." The actual extent of inclusion varies from state to state: In 2003, many students ages 6 to 21 with special needs spent at least 80 percent of the school day in a regular classroom, according to "Quality Counts 2004: Count Me In," published by Education Week in January 2004. See the data for your state.

Proponents of inclusion argue that every child has an equal right to an excellent education. Margie Romans, a first-grade teacher for 18 years, speaks highly of the system: "I've had autistic kids in my room, kids with language development problems, even a little boy who was deaf, and it was truly a joy to me." She sees inclusion as beneficial for everybody. When "regular" students are around children with special needs, they are learning every day that in some ways these students are just like them, and in some ways they are not. Children with special needs see that too, Romans says.

While many advocates of inclusion say it fosters compassion and empathy, this is not always the case, says Rebecca Thomas, who has taught special education students for 23 years. "We've had children mainstreamed at the middle school level who were bright enough to be in regular classrooms, but it hasn't always worked out," she says. "For one girl who went to a middle school, it was very difficult. The kids made fun of her and stole her lunch money every day."

Critics also argue that placing a student with special needs in a regular classroom is likely to consume too much of an already overworked teacher's attention.



 
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by on Sep. 2, 2011 at 11:56 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jltplk25
by Gold Member on Sep. 2, 2011 at 11:58 AM

I get how including every child in one classroom can be beneficial but it could also be a hinderance to those with special needs. The lady who said it was a 'joy' to her to have an autistic child, a deaf child, and another special needs child should stop and think of how the situation is impacting the special needs children.

I could NOT imagine my autistic, non verbal brother-in-law in a classroom with other 'normal' children. There is no way he'd make it through the day!

splatz
by Sarah on Sep. 2, 2011 at 12:01 PM
I think that would be harder for the special needs kids. They really need that extra one on one and someone who better understands those needs. :(
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mrsnoble2004
by on Sep. 2, 2011 at 1:10 PM

I suppose it could really depend on the temperament of all the students involved. Some kids are more compassionate than others.

goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 2, 2011 at 1:18 PM

My dd isn't special needs but she does have an aide in classroom. She's with all the other kids. If the school tried to segregate her I would raise hell. And they know it LOL.

I think it should really be up to the parents.

jltplk25
by Gold Member on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:01 PM

BUMP!

jltplk25
by Gold Member on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:04 PM

I dont see the problem if the kid can handle it but some just aren't cut out for inclusion. A deaf child in a class full of hearing children? I could only imagine the taunts that child would/could get if they had to have an interpter. (I've watched Switched at Birth too much. Lol) Like I mentioned in my first reply, my 2.5 year old brother in law probably wouldn't be able to handle it. The poor kid can only say 'Momma' at this point.

Quoting goddess99:

My dd isn't special needs but she does have an aide in classroom. She's with all the other kids. If the school tried to segregate her I would raise hell. And they know it LOL.

I think it should really be up to the parents.


 
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goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:14 PM

I went to school with a deaf girl. We sat right next to each other. I don't think she had any problems. She had someone with her.

I hope your brother in law gets the help he needs. He could be in a school already. My dd started when she was 1. And it helped tremendously. She was in primarily for speech.

Quoting jltplk25:

I dont see the problem if the kid can handle it but some just aren't cut out for inclusion. A deaf child in a class full of hearing children? I could only imagine the taunts that child would/could get if they had to have an interpter. (I've watched Switched at Birth too much. Lol) Like I mentioned in my first reply, my 2.5 year old brother in law probably wouldn't be able to handle it. The poor kid can only say 'Momma' at this point.

Quoting goddess99:

My dd isn't special needs but she does have an aide in classroom. She's with all the other kids. If the school tried to segregate her I would raise hell. And they know it LOL.

I think it should really be up to the parents.



jltplk25
by Gold Member on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:18 PM

Like I said, I watched Switched at Birth too much. Haha. As for my bil, he's in pre-K right now, just finished up his second week. It's a special needs pre-k though. If how things are in the church nursery on Sundays are any indication as to how him in a regular school class would go, it wouldn't be pretty. The last time he was in the nursery, he was left to sit in the corner and whine while the other children played together. No one knows how to handle him and of course teenagers and those right out of high school have NO clue about anything. Lol.

Quoting goddess99:

I went to school with a deaf girl. We sat right next to each other. I don't think she had any problems. She had someone with her.

I hope your brother in law gets the help he needs. He could be in a school already. My dd started when she was 1. And it helped tremendously. She was in primarily for speech.

Quoting jltplk25:

I dont see the problem if the kid can handle it but some just aren't cut out for inclusion. A deaf child in a class full of hearing children? I could only imagine the taunts that child would/could get if they had to have an interpter. (I've watched Switched at Birth too much. Lol) Like I mentioned in my first reply, my 2.5 year old brother in law probably wouldn't be able to handle it. The poor kid can only say 'Momma' at this point.

Quoting goddess99:

My dd isn't special needs but she does have an aide in classroom. She's with all the other kids. If the school tried to segregate her I would raise hell. And they know it LOL.

I think it should really be up to the parents.

 



 
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goddess99
by Michelle on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:22 PM

aww that's sad. and I've never seen switched at birth so Idk? LOL

Autistic kids Need people who understand autism. Hopefully the people at preK know what they're doing.

Quoting jltplk25:

Like I said, I watched Switched at Birth too much. Haha. As for my bil, he's in pre-K right now, just finished up his second week. It's a special needs pre-k though. If how things are in the church nursery on Sundays are any indication as to how him in a regular school class would go, it wouldn't be pretty. The last time he was in the nursery, he was left to sit in the corner and whine while the other children played together. No one knows how to handle him and of course teenagers and those right out of high school have NO clue about anything. Lol.

Quoting goddess99:

I went to school with a deaf girl. We sat right next to each other. I don't think she had any problems. She had someone with her.

I hope your brother in law gets the help he needs. He could be in a school already. My dd started when she was 1. And it helped tremendously. She was in primarily for speech.

Quoting jltplk25:

I dont see the problem if the kid can handle it but some just aren't cut out for inclusion. A deaf child in a class full of hearing children? I could only imagine the taunts that child would/could get if they had to have an interpter. (I've watched Switched at Birth too much. Lol) Like I mentioned in my first reply, my 2.5 year old brother in law probably wouldn't be able to handle it. The poor kid can only say 'Momma' at this point.

Quoting goddess99:

My dd isn't special needs but she does have an aide in classroom. She's with all the other kids. If the school tried to segregate her I would raise hell. And they know it LOL.

I think it should really be up to the parents.





stormystar15
by on Sep. 2, 2011 at 3:30 PM
I have 2 cousins that are special needs and they were in a special needs class. although they usually understand everything your saying they needed that extra one on one to fully understand. i think if they would have been in a regular class that it would have hindered them actually learning and them just becoming more fustrated with learning. i think its different for every child though so it just depends.
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